China Commentary
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China Commentary
Tracking Military, Geopolitical & Strategic trends to determine China's impact Regionally Globally and Domestically
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Decoding Xi Jinping's 'China Dream'

Decoding Xi Jinping's 'China Dream' | China Commentary | Scoop.it
Xi Jinping's reformist agenda goes hand in hand with his crackdown on social activists – but that may not be as contradictory as it sounds.
DOSID's insight:

Rather, Xi believes in the Communist Party and in its unchallenged rule. But the party he has inherited – bloated, bureaucratic, and corrupt – has largely lost the trust of ordinary Chinese citizens. To rectify that problem, Xi has girded his reformist loins.

“Winning or losing public support is an issue that concerns the Communist Party’s survival or extinction,” he said last month, launching what he called a year-long “thorough clean up” of the party.

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Susan Kelly's curator insight, August 26, 2013 6:54 AM

Interesting political piece.

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Is Xi Jinping a Reformer? Wrong Question.

Is Xi Jinping a Reformer? Wrong Question. | China Commentary | Scoop.it
Instead of asking if Xi Jinping and his colleagues have the desire and power to launch substantial reforms, it might be more useful to examine a different question, writes CRT columnist Yiyi Lu.

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Much has been said and written on the prospects for reform in China since the 18th Communist Party Congress last November, but few analyses offer anything that is truly original or illuminating. This is hardly surprising, given that most commentaries try to address questions such as “Are the new leaders reformers or conservatives?” “Does Xi Jinping have enough power to push though reforms?” or “What must the new leadership do if it is serious about reform?” While such questions are not completely invalid, they inevitably lead to highly subjective and speculative conclusions that are of very limited value.

 

Better questions are needed in order to produce more useful analyses and forecasts of China’s political development. Such analyses should start by recognizing two facts: First, the new leadership’s various initiatives and pronouncements after taking office indicate that it fully accepts the need for change. Second to quote the American political scientist Samuel Huntington, the leadership is clearly aiming at “some change but not total change, gradual change but not convulsive change.” In short, the leadership wants controlled reform, not revolution or regime change.

 

Huntington has argued that implementing reform is far more difficult than staging revolution. The methods, timing, sequencing and pace of changes all need to be carefully managed. If not handled well, reform will lead not to stability but to greater instability and may serve as a catalyst of revolution. China’s experience with reform and revolution through history, especially its modern history, certainly lends support to this argument.

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China Inches Toward a Slimmer Bureaucracy

China Inches Toward a Slimmer Bureaucracy | China Commentary | Scoop.it
Entrenched officials are sure to resist the latest reform efforts

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In China’s never-ending effort to slim its central bureaucracy, Beijing plans next month to restructure the cabinet-like State Council. Some ministries will be merged, and others will get expanded responsibilities in moves to be unveiled at the annual National People’s Congress, which opens on March 5. That is also when China’s new party secretary, 59-year-old Xi Jinping, will assume the presidency and 57-year-old Li Keqiang will become premier.

 

China’s Central Committee, the several hundred-member party leadership body, will meet Feb. 26 to 28 to discuss the proposed government revamp. The plans for an administrative restructuring were also endorsed at a much smaller meeting of the 25-member Politburo over the weekend, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. “It was agreed that efforts will be made to achieve simpler and decentralized administration as well as push forward institutional reform,” Xinhua reported Feb. 23. “More efforts should be made to improve administrative efficiency and the socialist market economic system,” the report said, without specifying details.

DOSID's insight:

"And the planned ministerial restructuring may not be as important in boosting China’s economy as other less flashy but crucial reforms, says Andrew Batson, research director at the China-focused consultancy GK Dragonomics in Beijing. China’s economy grew 7.8 percent in 2012, its slowest pace in 13 years. “There are a large number of day-to-day barriers in terms of getting approvals, getting chops [a kind of signature], that companies have to go through in China,” says Batson. “The question that is uppermost for me: Will there be a push to reduce the amount of red tape and bureaucracy that private enterprises face as they try to go about doing business, or is this just an internal rearrangement of the structure of bureaucracy?”"


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