Censorship
36 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

The 11 Most Surprising Banned Books (PHOTOS, POLL)

The 11 Most Surprising Banned Books (PHOTOS, POLL) | Censorship | Scoop.it
Even though it's not banned books week, the issue of censorship is ever-present, and while going through the list, we found those that didn't surprise us (Howard Stern's "Private Parts," "The New Joy of Gay Sex," Judy Blume's "Are You There, God?
Mary Glynn's insight:

This article presents a slideshow about  11 of the most surprising banned books. The article shows the cover of each of the 11 books, as well as a brief description about the book and why it has been banned.

 

I was looking for articles on banned books for my Children's Literature class when I stumbled upon this article from the Huffington Post. I could not believe some of the books that were on this list. For example, the first book of the slideshow is the dictionary. Yes, the Merriam Webster Dictionary!!! It has been banned from a school in California for its defintion of oral sex. I could not believe that the dictionary was banned from a school. I mean I guess children could look up bad words in it, but I cannot remember a single classmate of mine growing up who said, "Hey, let's go look up bad words in the dictionary." In fact, the only time anyone used the dictionary in class was when a student did not know the meaning of a word and the teacher said, "Look it up." Other than that, the dictionary sat in the classroom library gathering dust. I could not believe that someone actually protested having the dictionary in the classroom.

 

Another shocking book on the list is Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? I LOVED this book growing up. It was one of my favorites and I read it to my parents many times, and I can guarentee you there is nothing inappropriate within the pages of this book. In fact, the reason it was banned was not for its content, but rather the author's name. Apparently the author has the same name as a Marxist theorist, but the Texas Board of Education (the group of people that banned the children's book) did not check to see if it was the same person. They just decided to ban it anyway. This is one reason why I am against censorship. There is nothing wrong with this book, and the Texas Board agrees with this. It is a book about different animals. So why are you banning it? Because of the author's name!?? I highly doubt that the children reading this book are going to think about the author and his beliefs. They just want to read about animals and look at the colorful pages of the book. People are ridding children of amazing and enjoyable books over nothing, and it annoys me. A LOT.

 

I  think that a lot of the books that have been banned and continue to be censored are because there are people out there looking for mistakes and reasons that do not exist. I do not think people realize the consequences of their actions when they censor books. They need to know that many children will miss out on the laughs, the smiles, and the joy that comes from reading these books. They are taking away an author's purpose in life and preventing their stories from touching the lives of tons of children. Like the authors in the Penguin Books video said, "Free speech matters." These books are so much more than words on a page, and people need to realize that. People need to stop censoring books, so children can get the laughs, smiles, and joy that comes from reading a book.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

SchoolLibraryJournal (sljournal) on Twitter

SchoolLibraryJournal (sljournal) on Twitter | Censorship | Scoop.it

"North Carolina Community Rallies in Support of Challenged Allende Book http://ow.ly/rJ0UE"

Mary Glynn's insight:
This Twitter account tweets on behalf of the School Library Journal which is one of the largest children and young adult reviewers for literature. It is a reliable source to turn to for guidance on what children and young adult books to read, what the Journal and others are saying about specific books, and general information about literature. After finding this Twitter account, I started following it immediately. It is so informative and truly a great resource for parents and teachers to use. Parents can use it to read School Library Journal's (SLJ) summaries of children's books and discover the content of the books, so they can find interesting and appropriate books their children can read. Teachers can use this account to find different types of books to include in their classroom and school libraries. For example, every day SLJ tweets their "Pick of the Day" which highlights a specific book and goes into depth about the plot and its value the book holds. SLJ also does an incredible job of being inclusive and finding books that relate to many children. It references and promotes books with characters of different race, ethnicity, religion, and background, so that every child can connect with a book. I think it is very important that children can see themselves in the books they are reading. One of my professors, Dr. Melissa Landa, told me that books should be a child's mirror and window. It should be a mirror in a way that they should be able to relate and see themselves in the characters and in the book. The book should be a window by allowing a child to see and learn about another culture or group of people. This struck me and I know that I will remember it always. I believe all books should be mirrors and windows, and SLJ does a good job of recognizing those that are, and lets the world know that those books are pieces of high-quality literature and need to be read.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Are You with the Banned?

Are You with the Banned? | Censorship | Scoop.it
Celebrating Banned Books Week, September 30th-October 6th Banned Books Week is currently celebrating its 30th anniversary! "Celebrating the freedom to read," this annual event aims to raise awarene...
Mary Glynn's insight:
This blog celebrates Banned Books Week celebrating the freedom of reading and informing people about the books that are challenged and banned all across the nation. It presents multiple examples of books that have banned throughout the years and the reasons why they were challenged. The blog also includes an interesting graph about the different reasons books have been challenged, and the number of books that have been challenged by each reason within the last 20 years. According to the graph, over 16,500 books have been challenged within the last 20 years. 16, 500! That is an insane number of books!! I think it is crazy that The Catcher in the Rye continues to be challenged because it is "a filthy, filthy book." I can name multiple television shows that are much raunchier than The Catcher in the Rye like Family Guy, The Simpsons and others. So if this novel is considered bad, then what does it say about the millions of people who watch these television shows? I almost feel as those society is sometimes stuck in the conservative past. Today's world is very different than 20 or even 10 years ago. Today, sex is everywhere. It's in songs, television shows, in movies, online. EVERYWHERE. So why are people still holding books to the standards of the past? Times have changed. If The Catcher in the Rye is considered sexually explicit, how would you define Miley Cyrus's 2013 performance on the VMAs? How are these two items comparable? I know many children saw this performance live or online. Are people going to try and take away the Internet and technology next? I think it is ridiculous that so many classics that teach children so much about literature and writing, and popular novels that inspire children to dream and use their creativity and imagination are being taken from them because of a handful of people. I would tell that group of people that they do not have to read these books, nor do they have to let their children read them. But they do not have the right to take literature away from others.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Controversy Over 5th-Grader’s Religion Speech - CBS Tampa

Controversy Over 5th-Grader’s Religion Speech - CBS Tampa | Censorship | Scoop.it
A 5th grade student won first place after he gave a speech about the history of people using religion to justify murder, but stripped of his title the same day by a school official.
Mary Glynn's insight:

This news article is about a 5th grade student, Zachary Golob-Drake, presenting a speech to his classmates to try and win entry to the regional competition. His topic centered on people throughout history using religion and faith as their reason for committing murder and other heinous acts. He stated that through the Golden rule the world would be a better place. Originally, he won his class competition, but later that day, the Assistant Principal told him that it was inappropriate. He had either "rewrite [his] speech, take the religion out or not compete."  After hearing what happened at school, Zachary's mother called many school and district officials, and even talked to the regional contest officials to fight for her son's right to give his speech in the competition. In the end, the school send home permission slips for the parents to sign informing them about the topics of the speechs. Zachary was allowed to give his speech in front of those with signed permission slips. Also, a district official stated that the religious pars in Zachary's speech was not the problem, but rather Zachary speaking about mass murders in front of 4th and 5th graders.

 

I included this article because I realized there are many forms of censorship found in the classroom. Although a lot of the censorship deals with books, there are restrictions on speech too. I thought that it was horrible for the Assistant Principal to take away his triumph and success. Why didn't Zachary's teacher know about his topic and speech ahead of time? The school should defintiely have preventitive measures, so if there is a question about the appropriateness of a topic they can deal with it before the competition, and before a child has to have his ribbon taken from him.

 

However, I also think that he should have been able to give his speech no matter what. Zachary's intention was not to persuade his classmates that one religion was better or more just than another. Nor did he attack one religion claiming it is soley responsible for many deaths and tragedies. In fact, Zachary addresses examples of multiple religions and how all people have used faith as an excuse to harm others (e.g. Crusades, 9/11 attacks, etc.). He just states the truth which is that every person of every religion and background should treat others like they want to be treated. Zachary sends a powerful message for such a young boy, and he deserved to have his thoughts heard. By asking him to change his speech, the school is teaching Zachary and other children that the have to talior what they say and that their true thoughts are not right/should not be spoken or heard. Therefore, I believe that children's voices should not be censored.

 

I think that many parents and adults want to hide their kids from death and other sad and scary things in life. However, they WILL experience it at some point in their life, or they already have. Therefore, the topic should not be taboo in schools if addressed properly and gently.  Zachary did not go into detail about the murders. He just stated why they happened. I think that important topics should be addressed, but in the right manner. I think it is harmful for topics to be completely removed from the classroom because in the classroom they can disscuss these issues in a controlled, safe setting.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

▶ Penguin Presents: Authors Stand Up for Free Speech - YouTube

Let Your Voice Be Heard #FreeSpeechMatters
Mary Glynn's insight:

In this video, authors tell viewers why free speech matters to them. You hear about censorship from their point of view.

 

I REALLY liked this video. We always hear from the protestor's perspective, and this video gave me a window into the author's side of the story, and why they write what they write. There is a part in the video where Sarah Dessen says a very powerful statement, "When you take a book out of the school library, you are deny someone hearing that particular voice." This really struck me because it is very similar to what Jo Napoli said about these stories and voices needing to be heard. That voice could benifit a child's life in some way and you are preventing that from happening.

 

I use reading as my escape, as a way to avoid the stress of my life, and seek comfort and peace through the adventures and stories found between the pages of a book. I know that many censored and challenged novels including Harry Potter and a few of Sarah Dessen's books have helped me relax and brought about a moment of peace for me in times of struggle. I do not know what I would have done if I did not have the lovable characters and creative storylines found within these books. These authors put their hearts and souls into these books and they deserve to have their voices heard, and children deserve to have the solace and feel the emotions these books evoke. Writing is a form of speech and these authors have the right to freely express themselves through their books and their writings.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

TEDxSwarthmore - Donna Jo Napoli - What Children (and Everyone Else) Need to Read

TEDxSwarthmore - Donna Jo Napoli - What Children (and Everyone Else) Need to Read | Censorship | Scoop.it
Children's books often are banned because people feel that the vulnerability of childhood gives them the right and responsibility to protect children. They s...
Mary Glynn's insight:

Donna Jo Napoli is  an author who writes books that include controversial topics including offensive language, racism, drugs, rape, and sexual content. In her TED talk, she addresses why her books and those like it should not be banned, or censored. She speaks of the value these books hold.

I admit that at first I believed that censorship can be a good thing when used properly, but after researching I have come to understand that it is important that books about these hard issues and topics are out there for children to read. These books can provide comfort, consolation, therapy, and confirmation for a child dealing with any of these issues. It will allow  a child to feel not alone in the world. There are people out there in similar situations, fighting the same horrible struggles. A book can teach children  "terrible things happen to good people all of the time." But censoring these books causes children going through these issues to feel isolated, thinking they are the only one dealing with their struggles.

 

Censorship also disables privileged children from seeing another perspective on life.It is important to show the lives of children struggling day to day, their battles, and the grief and pain they face. Without these stories, children will not understand the harshness of the world, and that happily ever afters do not happen for many in reality. So, I think people need to realize that when you ban a book for sexual content or obscene language (which is prevalent all throughout society), you are also banning children from feeling connected and comfortable, and from feeling sorrow and empathy for others.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Glynn
Scoop.it!

Controversial and challenged books in schools--PABBIS

parents against bad books in schools. challenged, banned, inappropriate, controversial books in schools
Mary Glynn's insight:

This website is named PABBIS which stands for Parents Against Bad Books in School. This website's purpose is to "identify some books that might be considered bad and why someone might consider them bad." By informing parents about the content within these "bad" books, organizations and parents can work to get them off the school's shelves. The website also provides titles and excerpts of children's books that have controversial material in them, so they have specific examples as to why they are "bad." 

 

I have mixed feelings about this website. I think this website is a great resource for parents for knowing what books their children are interested in and reading. I know that when I was younger, I read the excerpt on the back cover of books and decided to read them not knowing the mature content within. I think that before buying a book for their children, parents can use this website to make sure it is age appropriate. I also admit that I  looked at the books on the website's list and knew a handful of the titles, but did not realize the content within them. So, I like how informative the website is.

 

However, I dislike the name of the website, "Against Bad Books" because even though the entry page states that it is for the parent to determine if the books are "bad," by using this site name it is claiming the site's publishers believe all of these books to be bad. I also think it is unfortunate that this site is used to ban many books. Like Donna Jo Napoli stated in her TED talk, it is important for these stories to be told and heard. These books tell the lives of many around the world, and they desrve to have their perspective included and understood by the world. For example, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, includes rape, incest, and child molestation; yet it is a heartbreaking, beautifully written story that has touched many hearts. The Bluest Eye and other books like it bring about empathy, like Jo Napoli said, which is important for every child, teen,and adult to feel. Now while this specific story is not appropriate for young children, this could be read by high schoolers and young adults.The focus should not be on getting rid of these books, but rather how to pick the right book, for the right age, and the right child.

more...
No comment yet.