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Our History | Hunters Point Family

Our History | Hunters Point Family | Childhood | Scoop.it
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Great info on the Bayview/Hunters point

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Health issues in the Bayview

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It is absolutely insane how high the asthma rate and diabetes rate is in the bayview compared to not only the rest of the city, but also the nation as a whole. The disparity in not only wealth, but also resources and availability to resources is insane. I wish the reality of the situation wasn't like this, but it is.

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Our economy is failing our children

Our economy is failing our children | Childhood | Scoop.it
A gender difference in behavioral skills, seen as early as kindergarten, is hurting boys’ academic prospects and their earning potential.
The Juan and Only Source's insight:

Like I've stated before, the behavioral differences between low income children and middle class children are quite apparent, and most likely come forth due to the different parenting style of each class. But the gap between boys and girls is even bigger. Because of this gap between girls and boys, the achievements of boys stagnates over the course of their life, and because of this, the economy takes a toll.

Good news is, the future looks great for woman. More are earning college degrees and more are earning more money, but for boys, the future is looking pretty bleak. For the most part, boys are really starting to lag behind girls, due to a shift in teaching styles and focus, and because of this, the future of america's economy also looks bleak. It doesn't mean to say that the economy is solely dependent on boys, or that girls can't be better, but rather, both sexes need to be raised and taught equally, something that isn't really happening anymore.

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Do rich and poor parenting style matter?

Do rich and poor parenting style matter? | Childhood | Scoop.it

WResearch indicates middle class parents behave differently than low income parents, but who is right?

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While not directly answering the question posed in the title, this article does bring up a plethora of interesting questions and asks why those questions even need to be asked. First and foremost, the article tackles the age old question of what's the best way to raise our kids so they can reach their true potential. It may not be apparent to all, but to most, it's pretty obvious that individuals from different social classes raise their kids differently, so who's doing it right?

Unsurprisingly, Ethnicity and racial background doesn't really play a factor in how children are raised, as multiple individuals from different backgrounds but similar class raised their children in similar fashions.

What comes with social class is rigidness, authority, and freedom both and out of the classroom. For the most part, middle to upper class families are rigid with what they let their child doo outside of class, with some wiggle room here and there, but enjoy a teaching style that gives the child more freedom to explore for themselves. it's vise versa for low-income families, who for the most part, allow their children to roam free and explore the world on their free-time, after homework is done, but employ authoritative teachers who lead with rigidness.

I wish this article did more to articulate the effects of either parenting style. I don't necessarily want to be told which is better, but rather how the students and children of different economic classes react to different situations, and see if the cycle of poverty is continued because of it. Interesting thing to follow up with.

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The emotional impact of burglary on children

The emotional impact of burglary on children | Childhood | Scoop.it

Children whose homes have been burgled are more likely to struggle at school and have trouble sleeping, according to new research from independent charity Victim Support and home security specialist ADT.

A quarter of parents said that their child’s sleep was affected following a break-in at their home, while one in ten parents reported it had a negative impact on their child’s performance at school.

A third of parents found their children’s sense of personal safety and well-being affected and one in ten (10 per cent) reported an increase in bed-wetting. Parents reported their children were affected even if they were not at home at the time.

Nearly 300,000 children are believed to be the victims of break-ins every year in England and Wales.

The research also suggests that the emotional trauma of burglary on children and young people can be long-lasting.

Of the adults whose homes were burgled as children, more than a third still feel that the experience affects them in adulthood. One in three sleep with the light on and 44 per cent now prefer to sleep with someone else in the house.

Two in five parents say that their children needed emotional or psychological support following the burglary.

A separate survey of young burglary victims suggests that the impact on children may often be greater than even their parents realise.

Of the 53 children and young people questioned, nearly one in three admitted they still suffered nightmares, and nearly a third also said that the burglary had knocked their self-confidence.

The Take No More campaign, launched today by Victim Support and ADT, aims to step change the way society thinks of and responds to burglary.

The campaign will highlight the unacceptable levels of burglary, the impact it has on victims and will call for tougher sentences for burglars who target homes where children live.

Such a move is supported by two thirds of parents questioned in the survey who have children living at home.

ADT and Victim Support have pledged to work together for the next three years through their Take No More campaign to run free crime prevention schemes for householders, increase awareness of support services for burglary victims, and campaign to ensure that those victims get justice in court.

The Juan and Only Source's insight:

Golden:

"A separate survey of young burglary victims suggests that the impact on children may often be greater than even their parents realise."

 

"Nearly 300,000 children are believed to be the victims of break-ins every year in England and Wales."

 

"The research also suggests that the emotional trauma of burglary on children and young people can be long-lasting."

 

Thorns: 

"Nearly 300,000 children are believed to be the victims of break-ins every year in England and Wales."

 

"A third of parents found their children’s sense of personal safety and well-being affected and one in ten (10 per cent) reported an increase in bed-wetting. Parents reported their children were affected even if they were not at home at the time."

 

"A quarter of parents said that their child’s sleep was affected following a break-in at their home, while one in ten parents reported it had a negative impact on their child’s performance at school."

 

Questions:

Why do parents assume a traumatic event like a burglary would not be traumatic?

 

How and Why are the effects of a traumatic event long lasting?

 

What can be done to overcome the effects of a traumatic experience?

 

This article has less to do about parenting and the like but more so about traumatic experiences (which could be caused from horrible parenting). When you think about it, these effects of burglary/crimes could also be an issue of class; those who live in low-income neighborhood could be more likely to undergo a traumatic event in childhood, like a shooting, a murder, a robbery, or a burglary,

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Research shows chronic stress in early life may cause anxiety and aggression in adulthood - EmaxHealth

Research shows chronic stress in early life may cause anxiety and aggression in adulthood - EmaxHealth | Childhood | Scoop.it
Stress early in life not only causes uncomfortable feelings for kids, it may also lead to problems later in life. Kids often share their negative feelings about being stressed too much by acting up. It is always a relief to see a kid smiling and playing when that stress is lifted. New research shows by keeping life as stress free as possible for kids you are probably also helping them achieve better mental health later in life.
The Juan and Only Source's insight:

Burdens On Your Childhood Shoulders:
This piece scientifically digs straight into the topic of how interactions and experiences in childhood affect you in your adulthood. The burden's placed on a child aren't magically removed once they transition from childhood to adolescence to adulthood. I've read plenty of books on the physiological effects of different forms of reprimand and such, but never on exterior stress; especially in the form of medical examination. I want to look more on the physical; psychological aspects of early childhood memories; what creates fears, anxieties, ticks, habits, and the like. I want to look at how different classes/ethnicities/races deal with raising a childhood, and how they tackle the stress they may experience; thus, how do different types of people raise different types of people. Childhood experience can go beyond the psychological and can make an actual detrimental medical affect on a person. It  can do more than simply affect how someone tackles a situation and can actually cause different personalities.

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Environmental Injustice in the Bayview

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Green Peace has:

* Played key organizing role in opposing and stopping the combustion turbine power plants proposed for Southeast San Francisco and worked with allies to get the City and California Independent Systems Operator to close the Mirant power plant;

* Developed and implemented a successful Diesel Education and Emissions Reduction Project that worked effectively with residents, truckers, businesses, schools and bus drivers to reduce diesel vehicle idling in Bayview Hunters Point;

* Implementing a grassroots educational campaign to raise awareness among subsistence fishers and those that eat toxic fish from the Bay about the health threats from eating contaminated fish in large quantities and how to prepare and eat fish to reduce risk;

* Empowering African American and Pacific Islander mothers living in dilapidated public housing to organize and form the Huntersview Mothers Committee for Health and Environmental Justice;

* Educating and empowering African American youth and young adults from Huntersview public housing to form Youth In Action, a new youth group that has become an important voice for Bayview Hunters Point and the environmental justice  movement;

* Getting the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and state Department of Toxic Substances Control to increase their enforcement actions and regulatory oversight;

 

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Social class leaves its imprint

[ THIS ARTICLE FIRST APPEARED IN THE EDUCATION WEEK ON MAY 19, 2004.]   Social class leaves its imprint By  Richard Rothstein The 50th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s desegregation decision evokes a sense of national failure. Few whites and blacks …
The Juan and Only Source's insight:

Segregation's roots still take hold of our failing education system. Black students still do worse than whites, even when social economic class isn't a factor. It makes sense that, on a grand scale, black students do worse and the achievement gap is large, due to the economic disparity between the two demographics, but what struck me as interesting is the fact that regardless of economic background, black students still do worse, and thankfully, the article tries to address why.

The article states that a major factor into why black students may do worse is due to the differences in parenting, which then affect how a child reacts to the authority, or lack thereof, of a teacher. See, when children are raised by parents who are forced to follow orders day in and day out, they tend to then take that mindset home and parent with authority rather than collaboration. Next comes health, with children from low-income neighborhoods tending to live in less than great living conditions and growing up in front of tv's and screens.

 

When it comes to children from homes with equal economic backgrounds, the differences become clear. On average, black families may make the same income and have similar savings to their white counterparts, but will have substantially less when it comes to assets, that is to say, a student may try harder knowing their parents have the savings and assets to send them to college. 

Another way to look at it, is that, if a child knows their disadvantaged, and know they must try harder than their much better off opponents, while some students will try harder, most won't see the point in trying harder, since the chances of the leaving the poverty cycle is slim. And I don't blame them. Why try harder and do what you're teachers say when you have to go home to a poor neighborhood, where society is practically working against you, where hard work isn't rewarded because of the color of your skin.

 

This article was a real eye opener, but it leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Thankfully it doesn't just state the problems, but actually comes with solutions, no matter how broad. The issue isn't only on teachers, or maybe schools paying less attention to black students; the issue is that by the age of three, black children are already disadvantaged due to their economic class, their parenting at home, their living conditions, and even simply by the color of their skin. In order to make a substantial dent in the achievement gap, as a society we need to start young: set up day cares and preschools that help children develop healthily, increasing health care and support for disadvantages and low income students, get the students excited to learn and encourage them to succeed regardless of their circumstances.

 

Lastly, this is amazing:

"If we try to narrow the gap with school reform alone, we’re bound to be as disappointed 50 years from now as we are today."

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Multifaceted Trauma

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For the most part, I and others understand that any kinds of trauma or emotional/physical scar transcends childhood and enters adulthood. Regardless of what the exact trauma was, the truths and rights of childhood will consciously or subconsciously stay with individuals, i.e someone remembers a time where they were stuck in a high tree, and are then afraid of heights in adulthood vs someone feels unreasonably on edge when someone smells a certain way because their mother smelled that way. Sometimes the trauma is even normalized, such as hitting your kids, yelling, or others.

 

The article/page did an amazing job at labeling the issue of childhood trauma and touching on factors I never even thought of. One of the factors being the economic, future orientation, and long  term health consequences of childhood trauma. I never thought about how much money is used by the nation and individuals when someone undergoes trauma. It'd be interesting to see how much more/less on average someone makes when they have a background of trauma. I need to find an article about the cycle of abuse to really touch upon my subject. Or maybe I should turn it more towards how individuals of certain economic backgrounds raise their children differently that others, and how that affects a child's ability to learn.

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The Real Reason We Judge Other People

The Real Reason We Judge Other People | Childhood | Scoop.it
The author of Daring Greatly, who's launching Part 2 of the groundbreaking The Gifts of Imperfection e-course, on why we should stop criticizing others.

By Brené Brown


First, the bad news: If you have a fondness for snarky jabs -- ...
The Juan and Only Source's insight:

Killing Empathy

 

While not directly tied to my subject of childhood, this article is somewhat connected to an overall topic associated with the psychological and philosophical effects of childhood: Emotional Intelligence. This article articulates the effects of judging and where that judgment roots itself in.  Since my topic is about the effects of childhood into adulthood, and how our notions of right and wrong, do and don't, are rooted in our childhood, this article is an example of something very clear and open being dissected for what it truly is; a way of coping. It speaks about changing that inner dialogue urging you to judge and to show little empathy, just like I hope most people do once they realize where their actions and emotions are rooted from; childhood.

 

The majority of the commentators agree with the notion of 'Emotional Intelligence' (though wisdom may be a more appropriate term), though there are some who still strongly believe that a little judgment is healthy; how else would you know when something is bad for you unless you judge it against something else. I consider judgment to be more of a shackle, a way to selfishly and empathetically push yourself above others by putting them down. When it comes to judging the 'bad,' I think it's an issue of giving back, regardless of whether or not the person deserves it, because that's what empathy is. Judgment is more about saying how something is bad, or worse, or better, or what have you relative to something else, rather than objectively labeling something as fact. Some tie a lack of judgment to religion, or lack there of, and vise versa. Some straight disagree and label the idea of not judging anything as 'silly.'

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