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Intrinsic Connectivity Networks: developmental time course

Intrinsic Connectivity Networks: developmental time course | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
In my last post I introduced the mouse trap readers to ICNs , ICA and the rs-fcMRI (resting state Functional connectivity fMRI) procedure that is used to...
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Child Psychology
Developmental psychology : with a focus on developmental stages
Curated by Sandeep Gautam
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For the budding child psychologists

Here is an idea for a research project (maybe will expand in a blog post some day):

its well established that positive emotions and negative emotions are not just opposites on a continuum but creatures from different planets ( i.e. they are two separate dimensions of measuring affect).

Now, similarly it can be conjectured that just like there are positive establishment procedures (like consistently caring for your child) that can lead to positive outcomes and affects (like secure attachment leading to curious exploration by the child) , and the absence of such procedures (like not caring consistently for the child or not caring at all) can lead to negative outcomes (like insecure or avoidant attachment); so too it can be conjectured that there are also negative establishment procedures in early childhood that work via a different mechanism ( similar to the different mechanisms with which the negative emotions work vis-a-vis the positive emotions.

Another conjecture is that that mechanism may be bullying. It may be one of the negative establishment procedures in early childhood that may lead to feelings of humiliation, smallness, and shame. A typical consistent bullying (by say peers or teacher or for that matter even parents) may lead to such negative feelings and outcomes while it remains to be seen what effect other types of bullying (like gentle goading or pushing or the absence of bullying- which to remind again may not be the as leading to secure attachment) may have.

These ought to be important research areas, that need to be studied, and may or may not result in fruitful results- so invest you time , money and energy with a pinch of salt.      

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Imagine If Every School Played *This* Video Before Class

Imagine If Every School Played *This* Video Before Class | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

What are you teaching/ learning today?

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A New Approach to Education

A New Approach to Education | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
There is an active school movement in character education and teaching ethics. But we don't think it's enough to have children just learn about ethical virtuosity, because we need to embody our ethical beliefs by acting on them. This begins with empa...
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Caring and compassion at the forefronts of the new education!!

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Mis-Diagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children

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its important to not over-pathologise the activity levels, curiosity, intensity etc of some of the (gifted) kids:-)

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Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School

Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
The more time children spend in structured, parent-guided activities, the worse their ability to work productively towards self-directed goals. 
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

on the importance of free , unstructured play!

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 27, 2:25 PM

Equating free play with enhanced executive functioning is a very intriguing claim. -Lon

Michael Ruzza's curator insight, July 6, 12:11 PM

Yes. There absolutely needs to a mix of  play and work in a child's life as well as adults. 

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Do disruptive classes really get better if they include more girls?

Do disruptive classes really get better if they include more girls? | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
By Catherine Kelly, University of Manchester Classrooms are highly complex environments.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

"But given the practical and ethical difficulties of putting that into practice, it’s probably much more expedient to focus on teachers as the key variable in classrooms. We need to enable them to create positive relationships with all their pupils, and to facilitate classrooms with compassionate and accepting classmates, irrespective of gender balance."

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How We Make Progress « Annie Murphy Paul

How We Make Progress « Annie Murphy Paul | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

children learn not just in stages, but in moving between stages in a wave like pattern!

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Raising a Moral Child

Raising a Moral Child | Child Psychology | Scoop.it

A wonderful peice The tactics are different from those used for encouraging achievement.

Sandeep Gautam's insight:

a wonderful piece of work by Adam. compliments the earlier research on specificity of praise and growth mindset, with the new praise the person rather than action for good moral character.
Again it helps to remember, and not mix, the economic or success domain with the moral or relationships domain.

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What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School?

What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School? | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Setting aside the two predominant narratives of education, there's a third vision taking shape that's yet to be defined. What would a reimagined education system value and teach?

Via Ann S. Michaelsen, Suvi Salo, Bobby Dillard, David Hain
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

inquiry-centered learning.

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Ann S. Michaelsen's curator insight, February 21, 3:07 PM

“We need to begin to think about schools in a fundamentally different way,” Richardson said. In his vision of this third narrative, reformers would focus on creating an education system that supportsinquiry-based, student-centered learning, where students are encouraged to find entry points into the mandated curriculum in ways that are meaningful to them. Technology is an integral part of Richardson’s vision because it allows students to create and demonstrate their knowledge. “That piece of it really allows kids to create things and connect with other people, arguably more important than much of the traditional curriculum that schools are built around,” Richardson said

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 21, 5:53 PM

Most of what is in this article has been understood for some time. I am reading Dewey, Whitehead, and Gadamer about education. There is no one-size-fits-all in their writing and thinking. The first two used a common phrase: "there is no royal road to learning." What is interesting is we seem to be recirculating ideas as if they are fresh and new without change. Ben Levine (2010) suggested their is political resistance to the change. I agree, but is the resistance where we think it is? I think it is in the political, bureaucratic and technocratic  levels and not so much in the classroom. I experienced what real great change was and watched it stripped down to nothing by those outside our little school. What we did was different and well done, but that is scary in education.

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‘Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil,’ by Paul Bloom

‘Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil,’ by Paul Bloom | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
The Yale psychologist Paul Bloom mines child-development research for insights into morality.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

the roots of morality in babies

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The Need for Pretend Play in Child Development | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Need for Pretend Play in Child Development | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
[This post was co-authored with Jerome L. Singer and Dorothy G. Singer]

Many people often think of play in the form of images of young children at ...
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Betty Skeet's curator insight, June 24, 4:53 AM

There is a real need for Pretend Play in  Child development' the seeds that can grow into beautiful minds...

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Understanding Children's Emotions: The Importance of Curiosity and Interest

Understanding Children's Emotions: The Importance of Curiosity and Interest | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Many of us may not, at first, think of interest as an emotion. Psychologists and neuroscientists, however, now regard interest as a fundamental emotion -- an emotion that motivates and guides our engagement in the world.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Interest is an important, and perhaps, the first emotion that children have.

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 16, 2013 4:07 PM

Interest is vital to emotional health in childhood and it remains vital, throughout life. Without interest, there is no curiosity, no exploration, and no real learning. 

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Watching Harry Potter films enhances creativity in children

Watching Harry Potter films enhances creativity in children | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Parents who feel guilty about letting their young children watch too many fantasy movies on TV can relax. Researchers have discovered that youngsters who watch films like Harry Potter improve their imagination and creativity.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

another good reason (as if one needed one:-) to watch fantasy films. Magical thinking and creativity are linked and magical thinking may be the link bewteen genius and madness too!

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David Hain's curator insight, April 15, 2013 2:40 AM

My kids will be very happy about this!

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 15, 2013 1:04 PM

I guess that's why I, as an adult, enjoyed the Harry Potter books so much. :) -Lon

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From Evaluation to Inspiration - YouTube

Severe ear infections rendered three-year-old Scott Barry Kaufman nearly deaf. As a result, he needed a few extra seconds to process things in real time, whi...
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inspired to redefine leadership.
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What Kids' Drawings Say About Their Intelligence

What Kids' Drawings Say About Their Intelligence | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
The number of features a child draws into their sketch of a person may say a little something about their intelligence
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

interesting!

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Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals « SENG

Existential Depression in Gifted Individuals « SENG | Child Psychology | Scoop.it

W

Sandeep Gautam's insight:

If you know of a gifted child who might be bugged by existential concerns, do read this to understand better and then intervene to make them feel understood, connected and welcome in a no-so-unstructured and not-so-meaningless world. 

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, July 30, 10:30 AM

"It is time that we trained health care professionals to give correct assessments to gifted, talented, and creative children and adults. At the very least, we must help professionals gain sufficient understanding so that they no longer misinterpret characteristics of giftedness."

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The Purpose of the Teenage Brain | Greater Good

The Purpose of the Teenage Brain | Greater Good | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
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the neural roots of adolescent issues

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Why Kids Care More About Achievement Than Helping Others

Why Kids Care More About Achievement Than Helping Others | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that parents and teachers may be sending kids the wrong message.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

Success and happiness,  at times , are at odd with, meaning and morality ; and we need to role model the empathic concern we want our children to pick up:-)

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 27, 2:13 PM

A great essay that looks at achievement vs. altruism and many implications.  Especially interesting is the reader comments at the bottom.  Usual poking at each other without flaming disrespect. :) -Lon

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The Decline of Play and Rise of Mental Disorders: Peter Gray at TEDxNavesink - YouTube

In this talk, Dr. Peter Gray compelling brings attention to the reality that over the past 60 years in the United States there has been a gradual but, overal...
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

the importance and need for play cannot be overemphasized.

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Betty Skeet's curator insight, June 24, 4:45 AM

Link between the decline in Play and the gradual rise in mental disorders...talk by Dr Peter Gray

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Success and Happiness across the Life Span: What Matters Most During Childhood?

Success and Happiness across the Life Span: What Matters Most During Childhood? | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Across cultures, parents’ long-term objectives for their children include happiness, integrity, and the fulfillment that comes from doing work they value and sustaining meaningful relationships. In this article, I write about six childhood factors that increase the likelihood of people making happily productive lives for themselves.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

"

The child who experiences loving attunement and ample opportunities for unstructured play has a head start toward happy productivity across the life span. Her chances of fulfilment and success are even higher if she also acquires somewhere along the way the habits of reflection, engagement, gratitude, and grit. - See more at: http://www.creativitypost.com/psychology/success_and_happiness_across_the_life_span_what_matters_most_during_ch#sthash.PahOY0Lv.dpuf";
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Advice for Psychological Evaluation Reports: Write about people, not tests

Advice for Psychological Evaluation Reports: Write about people, not tests | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
At its best, the end product of a psychological assessment is that a child’s life is made better because something useful and true is communicated to people who can use that information to make bet...
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

 a very important part of testing is communicating what the testing has accomplished!!

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 27, 10:58 AM

An intriguing suggestion.  I relate to it from reading numerous psych reports that are talking so much about the numbers that the person gets lost in the report. -Lon

Lou Salza's curator insight, March 27, 2:41 PM

Excellent example of what the author means by telling a story in the report--Lou  

 

Excerpt:

"...

Not only are humans storytelling creatures, we are also storylistening creatures. We are moved by drama, cleansed by tragedy, unified by cultural myths, and inspired by tales of heroic struggle. Most importantly, through stories we remember enormous amounts of information. Tabulated test results are inert until the evaluator weaves them together into a coherent narrative explanation that helps children and their caregivers construct a richer, more nuanced, and more organized understanding of the problem. Compare the following assessment results...."

This post is an excerpt from:

Schneider, W. J. (2013). Principles of assessment of aptitude and achievement. In D. Saklofske, C. Reynolds, & V. Schwean (Eds.), Oxford handbook of psychological assessment of children and adolescents (pp. 286–330). New York: Oxford.

 
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The upper age of adolescence is being increased from 18 to 25 in a bid

The upper age of adolescence is being increased from 18 to 25 in a bid | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
It is hoped the new guidelines being given to child psychologists will prevent children being 'rushed' through childhood.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

doesn't change the legal/ moral maturity definitions imho.

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How Can We Help Our Children Become 'Grittier?'

How Can We Help Our Children Become 'Grittier?' | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
As Angela tells us, they are often talented and smart. But when it is time to write an essay, practice an instrument, or study for an exam, they procrastinate or give up.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

grit +growth mindset!

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Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders

Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Why Education Needs More Radioactive Spiders - The Huffington Post
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one needs to light the fire and then just sit back and watch the fireworks!

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Babies’ Brains: When Does Consciousness Emerge? | TIME.com

Babies’ Brains: When Does Consciousness Emerge? | TIME.com | Child Psychology | Scoop.it
Finding the point at which babies' reactions change from being purely reflexive to reflecting more intention is leading researches to focus on the first glimmers of conscious thought in infants as young as 5 months old.
Sandeep Gautam's insight:

I wont be surprised if as young as 2-3 days old babies showed some signs of consciousness:-) in terms of EEG signals!!

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 16, 2013 4:24 PM

So while the youngest babies may not be conscious of much, they can provide valuable information about how conscious thought emerges, and how it develops over time. And with that understanding, we may learn a great deal about what it means to be aware.