Chief Technologis...
Follow
Find
9.6K views | +0 today
Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
onto Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy
Scoop.it!

12 scary Google Glass predictions 'The Simpsons' got right | Gearburn

12 scary Google Glass predictions 'The Simpsons' got right | Gearburn | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

...the latest episode lampoons Google Glass perfectly (called “Oogle Glasses” in The Simpsons’universe), with an episode called “Specs and the City”. If you’re living in the US, you can watch the episode here.

 

I get what The Simpsons is trying to do here, and you can see it for yourself when you’re out and about in your city. We’re all buried in our smartphones and the few with Google Glass are on another level to us....

 

Firstly, this was The Simpsons' finest half-hour in years. The last time I laughed at an episode, I had just purchased an Xbox 360. It was 2008. That ...

Via Jeff Domansky
Christian Verstraete's insight:

A good lauch every morning helps you keeping fit

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 29, 2:51 PM

Very funny and most enjoyable!

aanve's curator insight, January 29, 6:22 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, January 30, 1:02 AM

l'épisode des Simpsons avec les Google glass n'est pas encore dispo en Europe mais il est parait-il assez visionnaire...en tous cas sur les conséquences facheuses que celà pourrait avoir..."déconnecter de la réalité"?

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

How Facebook Moved 20 Billion Instagram Photos Without You Noticing | Enterprise | WIRED

How Facebook Moved 20 Billion Instagram Photos Without You Noticing | Enterprise | WIRED | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Your Instagram photos aren't where they used to be, and they moved without you even noticing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Digital transformation and the high performance enterprise | ZDNet

Digital transformation and the high performance enterprise | ZDNet | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Digital business transformation is the latest buzzword. These stats demonstrate how to gain real business benefit from the trend.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Hype is rising over sensor data but success will hinge on fundamentals

Hype is rising over sensor data but success will hinge on fundamentals | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
The buzz is on for sensor data but extracting value as always will hinge on mastering the data fundamentals The Data Mill reports
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Internet of Things, we better get prepared

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Salesforce Takes Its Cloud Model to Health Care

Salesforce Takes Its Cloud Model to Health Care | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Salesforce and Philips are jointly announcing what they call an “open cloud-based, health care platform,” with an initial focus on managing chronic ailments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

IBM SoftLayer chief: A Rackspace acquisition is 'not exciting'

IBM SoftLayer chief: A Rackspace acquisition is 'not exciting' | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
So just scratch IBM off the list, OK?
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Who will buy ultimately?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Cisco swallows Tail-f, burps out network orchestration plans

Small-ish, Swedish, firm will be assimilated for cloud management purposes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Complement The machine with a distributed mesh cloud, welcome to the future

Complement The machine with a distributed mesh cloud, welcome to the future | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
When the HP 9100A was introduced in 1968 it was called a “calculator.”
As Bill Hewlett explained, “If we had called it a computer, it would
have been rejected by our customers' computer gurus, because it didn't
look like an IBM. We therefore decided to call it a calculator, and all
such nonsense disappeared.” The Machine, introduced last week at HP
Discover, shares an unusual name for similar reasons. It’s not a server
in the usual sense of the term. It’s actually something really new, and
as such, deserves a new name. As Martin Fink pointed out during his
keynote presentation, HPLabs does not have a Marketing Department, hence
a real down-to-earth name. Listen to Martin explaining it in his own
words. In my last blog entry, I described “The Machine,” and explained
why it is so revolutionary. But where things really start to become
interesting is when you look at how The Machine can transform the Cloud,
and address the future needs we have in the Big Data space. If you’re
following this space, you will know there is debate as to where the
Internet of Things data should be treated, and what the implications of
that are on the Internet. A couple weeks ago, I actually wrote a blog
entry titled, “Cloud, Fog, is the future of IT at the edge or the
center?” where I conclude that one size does not fit all. Analyzing the
end-to-end architecture will be key in understanding what choice to
make. The Machine gives all of us a lot of flexibility in designing how
to go after such an issue. Actually, combined with another research
currently going on in HPLabs, and called Distributed Mesh Cloud (DMC)
—or Distributed Mesh Computing, depending upon who you ask—The Machine
allows us to choose the best approach for each problem we try to
address. A mesh network A mesh network is a network topology in which
each node (called a mesh node) relays data for the network. All nodes
cooperate in distribution of data in the network. Think about this:
Although cloud refers to a fluffy, ever-changing object, Cloud Computing
relies on physical datacenters in defined locations, interlinked with
each other. And Clouds are subdivided in geographical entities and
availability zones. Sure, you may not be fully aware of that, but if you
happen to have two servers in different zones or geographies of a public
Cloud, you will clearly see the difference on your bill. What if we use
the concept of a mesh network topology for the Cloud? Each Machine out
there participates in the Cloud, and operates one or several functions
within that mesh network. Machines on the edge collect raw data, store
it and perform a first level of translation and/or analysis. In doing
so, they may become aggregators, which deliver summary data to another
mesh node more in the center. That node can, in turn, aggregate summary
data from multiple first-line Machines, coordinate them, and make yet
more summary information available to the next Machine. And we can go
on. When I need to analyze some data, I’ll typically start with a
holistic view. I’ll be interested in a high-level view of what’s
happening. I’ll soon identify what I’m actually interested in, and zoom
into that information. The different Machines that contain the summary
and detailed information will provide me with the data required for me
to perform further analysis, or may actually perform that analysis on my
behalf, reducing the amount of internet traffic required. And this will
happen completely transparently to me. Advanced Storage Technologies Do
we have examples of how such things could work? Actually yes! The latest
storage technologies, such as 3PAR, include active mesh architectures,
and autonomic computing capabilities. This means that multiple tiers of
storage can be linked together to keep your data in the most efficient
way, transparently to you. It also means that if something goes wrong
somewhere, the system can heal itself. This is what you want in such
mesh Cloud, isn’t it? If one node goes down, you don’t even want to be
made aware of it. Wireless Mesh networks Now, let’s combine this with a
third element, wireless mesh networks. The infrastructure is, in effect,
a network of routers with no cables between them. It’s built of peer
radio devices that don’t need to have to be cabled to a wired port like
traditional WLAN access points. Mesh infrastructure carries data over
large distances by splitting the distance into a series of short hops.
Intermediate nodes not only boost the signal, but cooperatively pass
data from point A to point B by making forwarding decisions based on
their knowledge of the network, i.e. intermediate nodes perform routing.
Such an architecture may, with careful design, provide high bandwidth,
spectral efficiency, and economic advantage over the coverage area. So,
information hops from one node to the other. If a node disappears, the
others take over. I remember work done at HPLabs years ago, where they
looked at this technology to warn cars of a problem on the road. The
information would hop from one car to the next car down a line. Each car
would take action and convey the information to the next car. If there
was a big gap, the information would no longer be conveyed, but that was
not needed, because the next car was far away. Let’s now pull all this
together and come up with a couple scenarios how this distributed mesh
computer could work. Mayday, mayday, is something happening A Boeing 737
flying from coast to coast keeps around 31KB of data that can be
analyzed at the next airport. It actually generates gigabytes of data
during the flight, but only keeps a small amount. The reasoning here is
the other data is deemed normal. Only known issues are kept. The problem
is, in many situations unpredictable things happened. But because the
information leading up to it was not recorded, we have difficulty
understanding how things happened. That’s why you have flight recorders
and black boxes. Let me now take an example using The Machine. Let’s
assume a plane, for whatever reason, leaves its planned route. The
Machine, monitoring all plane information, quickly spots the unplanned
departure. It continues to store its data, but because of the unusual
situation, it starts communicating past and present information to a
control center. It does that by using satellite internet, but also
through a mesh network storing data onboard other planes that are in the
area and with whom The Machine is already in contact. All that
information is now available at the control center and they can properly
assess the situation. Using the multitude of communication channels
available, the information is accessible in real time. If for any reason
something really bad happens with the plane, all data is available and
the analysis can immediately start. There is no need to try and find the
black boxes. My safe line in my T-shirt It happens—unfortunately too
often—that elderly people pass away because their neighbors and family
do not realize something has happened. So, how could we keep them safe?
Well, the nature of The Machine (its low power-consumption level, and
its storage capability), would allow us to integrate data processing in
a T-shirt or other piece of clothing. Sensors could monitor vital
signals constantly, could share them with doctors, and identify if
something goes wrong. We already have glimpses of that with current
fitness trackers. However fitness trackers need to communicate via
Bluetooth and mobile phones. Again, using the mesh cloud approach,
communication could be guaranteed nearly everywhere, and lives could be
saved. And I’m not even talking about the opportunity for doctors to
monitor vital statistics, and compare them with other patients anywhere
in the world to allow faster diagnosis and treatment improvements.
Addressing the data explosion These are just two examples. I have a
bunch of others. I hope you understand why I’m getting so excited. The
Machine, and its environment, allows us to address many of the issues
that are coming down the line with the explosion of data. Such tools may
allow us to understand the big picture and not be buried in petabytes of
data that don’t seem to make sense. Our lives will continue to evolve.
Sure, many aspects remain to be discussed, not the least of which are
privacy and security. But we’re out for a bright and interesting future,
I believe. What do you think? How would you use tools such as The
Machine and distributed mesh computing? I’m looking forward to reading
your suggestions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

The history of Android: The endless iterations of Google’s mobile OS

The history of Android: The endless iterations of Google’s mobile OS | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

ctusallFollow Android's journey from Android 0.5 to Android 4.4.

Christian Verstraete's insight:

Actually quite true. Just got a new update of my mobile phone and it is different again. Keeps your brain fit I suppose.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

The Future of Digital Marketing is Already Here

The Future of Digital Marketing is Already Here | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

The future of digital marketing is already here, especially when it comes to presenting highly engaging, personalized, relevant advertising to consumers.

 

... Let’s think back to the movie Minority Report, which was filmed in 2002 but set in 2054. In a famous scene, Tom Cruise’s character walks into a Gap store. He scans his retinas, and the ad begins speaking to him: “Welcome back to the Gap Mr. Yakamoto, how are those assorted tank tops working for you?”

 

This movie predicted that, 50 years from now, personalized, 1:1 marketing would be the status quo. Director Steven Spielberg must have had a crystal ball – except that his timing was off. This type of personalized 1:1 marketing is much closer to reality than we’d think, thanks to the advent of tools and technologies like iBeacons (which can trigger messages sent to your phone based on your proximity to a certain location) and richly customized user experiences (easily implemented with real-time personalization tools)....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 13, 11:56 PM

Trending. Back to the future when it comes to advertising.

Tahar Mehenni's curator insight, June 16, 3:43 AM

http:www.globallshare.com/globaltadjer

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 16, 4:46 AM

Great read. 

Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Cloud Central
Scoop.it!

INFOGRAPHIC: The Future Of Big Data

INFOGRAPHIC: The Future Of Big Data | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Big Data is BIG business and will continue to be one of the more predominant areas of focus in the coming years from small startups to large scale corporations.

Via Peter Azzopardi
more...
Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, June 3, 2:55 PM

Included is an infographic created by the non profit group TiE which shows us where the industry looks to be heading.

Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Customer Adoption of Cloud Services
Scoop.it!

Cisco CEO: 'Brutal' Times Are Coming For The Tech Industry

Cisco CEO: 'Brutal' Times Are Coming For The Tech Industry | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Cisco CEO John Chambers believes that the rapid pace of change in the technology industry is going to create a bloodbath in the tech industry.

Via David Ednie
more...
David Ednie's curator insight, May 20, 3:03 PM

The best form of defense is attack, the saying goes. So if you need to defend your company’s performance you had better be able to point to peers with similar or worse performance than yours. If you really want to manage expectations down, then invent an impending gloom and doom scenario. Before you know it you will be perceived as a star performer that is conservatively and reliably managed. Where is the adapting to change, innovation and future growth story?

Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from The Internet of (Every)Things
Scoop.it!

Wearable technology is the future - Telegraph

Wearable technology is the future - Telegraph | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
With Apple rumoured to announce the 'iWatch' and Google Glass eyewear to go on sale, what is the future of wearable technology?

Via Tictrac
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Google's lost its "right to be forgotten" case in Europe, and that may not be a good thing

Google's lost its "right to be forgotten" case in Europe, and that may not be a good thing | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
It’s nice to see privacy rights upheld and Google’s attempts to evade European law firmly squashed, but even well-meaning rulings could turn sour when long-term enforcement remains impractical.
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Not sure I agree with that. Google claims it can no longer provide same search across the globe, but frankly that's already the case. If you search the same thing twice, you're not sure to get the same results.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Code Spaces goes dark after AWS cloud security hack

A company is forced to close its doors after an AWS cloud security breach in which hackers deleted data and machines from its EC2 account. Was the attack preventable?
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Sobering.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Internet of things will put pressure on enterprise security, says Proofpoint

Internet of things will put pressure on enterprise security, says Proofpoint | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
The internet of things will give attackers more ways to deliver malware into the enterprise, says Proofpoint
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Philips, Salesforce to launch new healthcare apps | Reuters

Philips, Salesforce to launch new healthcare apps | Reuters | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
AMSTERDAM/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Dutch healthcare and lighting company Philips said on Thursday it was teaming up with Salesforce, one of the first cloud-computing companies in the United States, to
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How Much Data Is Generated On Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Tinder & WhatsApp Every Minute? | AllTwitter

How Much Data Is Generated On Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Tinder & WhatsApp Every Minute? | AllTwitter | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

Here’s the thing: the internet never sleeps.

 

Which means data never sleeps, and the internet sure likes to use up a lot of it. How much? In any given minute, 277,000 tweets are published on Twitter, 216,000 photos are sent to Instagram and 8,333 videos are shared on Vine.

 

And we’re just getting started. Over that same 60 second period, 347,222 photos are sent on WhatsApp, 416,667 swipes are made on Tinder and 3,472 images are pinned on Pinterest.

 

And if you think that’s impressive, Google receives 4 millions search queries, Facebook users share 2.46 million pieces of content and 204 million email messages are sent each and every minute of the day.

 

This visual from DOMO looks at how much data is generated every minute across the net....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Moons Lucien's curator insight, July 4, 12:18 AM

Imagine the impact  on your business!! connecting your #print production to one of these web platforms? Millions of #prints :-))

to connect the value for the consumer to your #print #Rebootmoments workshop has develop 4 tools very easy to implement with your innovation marketing team,  that helps connecting these web technology with print. The June workshop in Stuttgard  Germany the  6 #printing companies  participating did exactly that: Innovate their business model with a #gamification solution and a #clickpaper

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, July 4, 6:01 AM

Wow! This is mind boggling. 

Victor Juarez's curator insight, July 7, 3:47 PM

¿Quién dice que las RRSS no tienen alcance?

Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Cisco, Promising Openness, to Acquire Tail-f for $175M

Cisco, Promising Openness, to Acquire Tail-f for $175M | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Tail-f has made its name in multivendor network configuration. Whether its Netconf-based work remains open under Cisco is the main question.
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Still promising openness? That will be interesting to see.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Cisco buys its way into AT&T SDN

Cisco buys its way into AT&T SDN | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Tail-f acquisition will give it entry into Domain 2.0 project, boost SDN/NFV cloud orchestration capabilities
Christian Verstraete's insight:

R&D by acquisition. How do you integrate all that?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Top European court to rule on NSA Facebook data privacy challenge

Top European court to rule on NSA Facebook data privacy challenge | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Europe’s top court will rule on whether data protection authorities should audit data Facebook allegedly gives to the US National Security Agency
Christian Verstraete's insight:

Ruling keeps coming and it always seems in the same direction

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

The Machine, a view of the future of computing

The Machine, a view of the future of computing | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
The second week of June is traditionally the week of HP Discover. It
allows me to be back in hot and sunny Las Vegas. This year was no
exception. What made this HP Discover interesting though is that HP is
having its 75th anniversary. Yes, it’s 75 years ago that Bill Hewlett
and Dave Packard tossed the coin and called the company Hewlett-Packard.
What would have happened if the coin had fallen on the other side and we
would have become PH? These have been 75 years of innovation and
although over the last decade analysts seemed to feel HP had stopped
innovation, things are definitely back on track. HP is back, I believe
that’s the key phrase for this HP Discover. So, let me give you a feel
of what I’m talking about. We introduced many products during the week,
and I will come back to some of those, but there is one thing I’d like
to talk to you about. It’s called “The Machine”. It’s not a product
(yet), but it’s an effort. And in the usual HP approach, we call upon
our partners to work with us on that effort. But what effort am I
talking about. Re-inventing the computing industry Since 1945, computers
follow a clearly defined architecture, called the “Von Neumann”
architecture. It consists of a control unit, arithmetic processors,
memory and input/output devices. Some special processors have been
created with other architectures, but all our general purpose computers
have been following this. Yes there have been major improvements, one of
the key ones was the RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computers) systems
introduced in the 80’s. By the way, HP played a major role in that. What
“The Machine” is, is changing the paradigm. Up till now, all computers
have been working with electrons. Sure you’ll tell me there are
experiments with quantum computers and others. But frankly these are
still in their infancy. Electrons have this nasty issue that at a given
moment in time you never know exactly where they are. So you need a
group of them to ensure, statistically, that you open or close a gate.
Over the years we have made silicon traces smaller and smaller, working
with less and less electrons. So, we are doomed to reach a limit, the
moment we will no longer be sure a gate is opened or closed as we don’t
know whether it will have been hit by an electron. Quantum computers try
to solve that by using quantum mechanics and photons rather than
electrons. The Machine takes a completely different approach. Realizing
that most computers spend up to 80% of their time on tasks that are
there to manage the environment, not to perform the task at hand, The
Machine just gets rid of these tasks making computers increasingly
effective. How do they do that? Well, in current environments, two key
tasks are taking the majority of the effort. On the one hand,
instructions and data keep being shuffled between persistent storage,
memory and cache. Things keep going up and down all the time through
these layers. And in that process we go through multiple communication
busses, each managed by their own software stack. What if we get rid of
them? The second task consists in all the systems we have developed to
be able to use the capacity of our current CPUs efficiently. These
include virtualization layers, multi-tasking etc. Again, what if we can
get rid of those? Cache, memory & storage, make it one If we would have
a single technology that would have the speed of cash while having the
persistence of storage, we could combine storage, memory and cash into a
single device that would keep all the information and instructions.
There would be no need any more to boot-up computers, to shut them down
or hibernate. All instructions and data would just be there when needed.
Is this dreaming? Actually no. HP developed a technology, called the
Memristor, which allows us, at affordable prices, to have cache, memory
& storage functionalities in the same system for the environments we
will need in the near future. And these include storage of the “big
data” we all talk about in previous blogs. Memristance is a property of
an electronic component. If charge flows in one direction through a
circuit, the resistance of that component of the circuit will increase,
and if charge flows in the opposite direction in the circuit, the
resistance will decrease. If the flow of charge is stopped by turning
off the applied voltage, the component will 'remember' the last
resistance that it had, and when the flow of charge starts again the
resistance of the circuit will be what it was when it was last active.
More information on the HP memristor activities are described in
Wikipedia. Let me just point one thing out for you to understand the
change. Using the memristor technology, HP prototyped a crossbar latch
memory that can fit 100 gigabits in a square centimeter, and proposed a
scalable 3D design (consisting of up to 1000 layers or 1 petabit per
cm3). In 2012 the device achieved a read time of 90 nanoseconds if not
faster, approximately one hundred times faster than contemporaneous
flash memory, while using one percent as much energy. Connect the memory
and the processor It’s great to have huge memory/storage space. But now,
how do we get quick access to all that memory as we will need it to do
the job. We could use copper, but in that case we would need huge cables
and consume great energy. So, why not go for fiber optics. Let’s
directly attach the memristor technology to the central processing unit.
Not only can you transfer information up to 6TB per second, but you do
it with very low consumption. So, you win on two fronts, speed and
energy consumption. Lower consumption also leads to lower heat
dissipation which in turn allows less need for cooling and the
opportunity to develop denser environments, so you take less space. And
what about the CPU Well, because you don’t need the compute power to do
the 80% of things you won’t do anymore, you don’t need the CPU power
either. So you can easily work with low energy chips such as the ones
used in cellular phones. We already worked on that with project
MoonShot. Actually just going for such architecture allowed us to reduce
the size of the IT environment powering hp.com, our website, from 25
racks to 3. With that, we are handling 300M hits per day. And the power
consumption is down to 720 watt. Taking this one step further, HPLabs is
looking at servers the size of a credit card. And, as with MoonShot, the
idea of using specialized servers for specific tasks is also in the
designs. In an internet of things world, this makes a lot of sense. As
servers are so small and don’t consume a lot of power, there is no need
any more to virtualize the environment. You can easily dedicate one
server to one task, particularly if you tune the server to the task. No
virtualization reduces the overhead and leaves more CPU power to do the
real job at hand. Pulling it all together Using ions to store, photons
to communicate and electrons to compute, that’s the vision of The
Machine. Simplicity is its motto. We have the opportunity to build an
environment that is very different from our current ones. But obviously,
the current operating systems have to take care of all the overhead
required. It would be very difficult to strip current operating systems
of all those functions so it makes sense to create a new one. That’s
what we want to do. But we do not want to do it alone, so we are
creating an open source project to develop the project. Listen to how
Martin Fink described “The Machine” at HP Discover in Las Vegas.
Conclusion I started this blog entry by pointing out “HP is back”, I’d
like to add, innovation is back at HP. I hope you agree with me, this
project is really exciting. But it is not all. We believe that this new
technology will allow us to create mesh clouds. You probably ask
yourself what that means. I’ll come back to you discussing this in my
next blog entry. But be aware, this is not the only news from HP
Discover, there is plenty more.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from The Future of Social Media: Trends, Signals, Analysis, News
Scoop.it!

The Future of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes

The Future of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

The first generation of social media touted "networking", but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems. They will follow a small circle of close friends on Instagram, pin with a small handful of followers on Pinterest, message with a girlfriend or schoolmate on WhatsApp or Snapchat, or follow a co-worker's check-ins on Foursquare.


Via Ilkka Olander
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Christian Verstraete
Scoop.it!

Marc Andreessen on the Future of Technology and Implications for Government Service to Citizens - CTOvision.com

Marc Andreessen on the Future of Technology and Implications for Government Service to Citizens - CTOvision.com | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
If you are a professional in technology, government and/or business you have no doubt already been exposed to the very interesting Marc Andreessen. Odds are many of our readers are already tracking his thoughts closely via his blog, his media interactions captured on YouTube and his very dynamic and thought engaging Twitter Feed where you can now track the dynamics …
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

The leaked New York Times innovation report is one of the key documents of this media age

The leaked New York Times innovation report is one of the key documents of this media age | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it

We don’t typically write about intra-newsroom politics at Nieman Lab, leaving that to Manhattan’s very capable cadre of media reporters. But Abramson’s removal and Dean Baquet’s ascent has apparently inspired someone inside the Times to leak one of the most remarkable documents I’ve seen in my years running the Lab, to Myles Tanzer at BuzzFeed.

 

It’s the full report of the newsroom innovation team that was given six full months to ask big questions about the Times’ digital strategy. (A summary version of it was leaked last week, but this is the big kahuna.)


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 18, 7:42 AM

It's an astonishing look inside the cultural change still needed in the shift to digital — even in one of the world's greatest newsrooms. Recommended rading. 10/10

Rescooped by Christian Verstraete from Daily Magazine
Scoop.it!

53+ Free Image Sources For Your Blog and Social Media Posts

53+ Free Image Sources For Your Blog and Social Media Posts | Chief Technologist Cloud Strategy | Scoop.it
Find the visual content you need with our complete list of free image sources, offering high-quality images for your blog posts and social media updates.

Via Official AndreasCY
more...
No comment yet.