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Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy

Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it

Developments in genetic engineering make it possible to 're-programme' the human immune system so that T cells - white blood cells that normally fight viruses - recognize and kill cancer cells. This approach, which directly harnesses the potency of the immune system, holds the prospect of a powerful new weapon in the fight against cancer.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Ronald 's insight:

This is the future of research in the medical field. I feel as if this is the job of a biological engineer, however, the splicing of DNA and the "reprogramming" mentioned may involve help from chemists that are contibuting to the project. I think that if this research is pursued by doctors and lab scientists, I will be able to give resolutions to cancer patients when I become a pediatrician. I hope that I will get a chance to contribute while I am attending the Univertsity of Washington, whose cancer facility, as well as the Fred Huchinson Cancer Research Center, is one of the best in the nation. I have relatives who have suffered from cancer, so I know the pain and suffering that patients have to endure. The sooner this problem is adressed, the better. In 2007, cancer took the lives of 8 million people. This number is only increasing as time goes by. WIth this newly found research, perhaps the world can be saved from this terrible disaster.

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Lisa Trundley-Banks's curator insight, August 5, 5:18 PM

Curing cancer surely has to be one of the biggest hopes we have from GE.

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Chemical engineering student receives awards for shale gas research - Texas A&M University

Chemical engineering student receives awards for shale gas research - Texas A&M University | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it
Chemical engineering student receives awards for shale gas research Texas A&M University Victoria E Getting Awad Victoria Ehlinger, a senior chemical engineering student at Texas A&M University, recently received two awards for her research efforts...
Ronald 's insight:

This makes me a very happy person. I had previously thought that a PhD  was necessarry in Chemical Engineering for an individual to be able to experiment and do research that may contribute in a huge way. Ms. Ehlinger is a very smart individual that can't be compared to any other, and the amount of work that was put into this project can't be forgotten. But he idea that a student could achieve what an experienced individual that could not amazes me.  This inspires me to be that person and to hopefully contribute to the world one day. The research done in this experiment was attainable though, most probable, difficult tasks and chasllenges that she faced along the way. But the fact that her determination to study the transfering of shale oil to methanol astounds me. Although I am still a long way from there, her skills give me the passion towork my hardest througout my college carrer.

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North America honours top chemical engineers - tce today

North America honours top chemical engineers - tce today | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it
North America honours top chemical engineers tce today LEADING chemical and process engineers from BakerRisk, Northwestern University and the University of Illinois were celebrated at IChemE's North American awards ceremony in San Francisco,...
Ronald 's insight:

This is a very interesting topic for me. I am intending on getting a bachelors in chemical engineering at the University of Washington soon and this gives me an idea of the gratitude I may recieve if I become a chemical engineer. Although I want to attend medical school after I recieve a bachelors, I may end up working as a chemical engineer prior to bacoming a pediatrician in my distant future. Hopefully I will be able to discover a breakthrough as great as the individuals who recieved this award, but this is only a hope. With the proper training and a degree, I will pursue my current goal and hopefully be able to apply the knowledge I learn in the near future.

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Rescooped by Ronald from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
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A Botryane Metabolite with a New Hexacyclic Skeleton from an Entomogenous Fungus Hypocrea sp.

A Botryane Metabolite with a New Hexacyclic Skeleton from an Entomogenous Fungus Hypocrea sp. | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it

Hypocrolide A (1), a botryane metabolite with a new hexacyclic skeleton, was isolated from cultures of the entomogenous fungus Hypocrea sp. The proposed structure was confirmed by X-ray crystallography using Cu Kα radiation. The mixed-biogenetic skeleton could be derived from the hypothetical precursors related to coumarin and dihydrobotrydiol, and the latter may be derived from the coisolated 10-oxodehydrodihydrobotrydial (2) or a similar analogue.

 

Yafei Yuan †§, Yu Feng †§, Fengxia Ren ‡, Shubin Niu †, Xingzhong Liu †, and Yongsheng Che Org. Lett., Article ASAPDOI: 10.1021/ol402953k


Via NatProdChem
Ronald 's insight:

This is what I will be doing as a chemical engineer. I feel as if this is, as of this moment, very chanllenging and somewhat out of my comfort zone. However, I am up to the challenge of learning and discovering things that are in teh biological and medical field. Although I want to become a pediatrician, I will learn the basics of becoming a chemical engineer and what they do. I am currently in AP Chemistry but this is beyond the academic level that I am currently at. Although the article does not specifically state the uses of this new chemical, I feel as if there will be a good application to be found soon. I think that during my studies at the University of Washington, I will be able to contribute to newly found ideas such as these and look further into the benefits of new chemicals for the benefit of the human race.

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Turning bacteria into chemical factories - MIT News

Turning bacteria into chemical factories - MIT News | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it
Turning bacteria into chemical factories
MIT News
After earning her PhD in chemical engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, Prather chose to spend time outside of academia, working at Merck.
Ronald 's insight:

This article forces me to reconsider the path that I am taking, Although Prather and I share the same passion for chemical engineering, she went as far as a PhD in order to be able to experiment and find new breakthoughs in biological and chemical fields. As far as the actual topic in itself, I think that she is a great woman who has contibuted a great find in the science and practical world. The idea that bacteria can make biofuels and drugs is an amazing thing. The thought that something that can replicate so fast can be used to make great things gives me hope that we can find a new way to sustain our great society and the world as a whole. Although there is still room for improvement in the field of worlk being conducted, I am confident that the scientists will be able to do it. Who knows. Maybe I may eventually help out on the project on hand and be a part of the new generation. But I can only hope.

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Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy

Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy | Chemical Engineering | Scoop.it

Developments in genetic engineering make it possible to 're-programme' the human immune system so that T cells - white blood cells that normally fight viruses - recognize and kill cancer cells. This approach, which directly harnesses the potency of the immune system, holds the prospect of a powerful new weapon in the fight against cancer.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Ronald 's insight:

This is the future of research in the medical field. I feel as if this is the job of a biological engineer, however, the splicing of DNA and the "reprogramming" mentioned may involve help from chemists that are contibuting to the project. I think that if this research is pursued by doctors and lab scientists, I will be able to give resolutions to cancer patients when I become a pediatrician. I hope that I will get a chance to contribute while I am attending the Univertsity of Washington, whose cancer facility, as well as the Fred Huchinson Cancer Research Center, is one of the best in the nation. I have relatives who have suffered from cancer, so I know the pain and suffering that patients have to endure. The sooner this problem is adressed, the better. In 2007, cancer took the lives of 8 million people. This number is only increasing as time goes by. WIth this newly found research, perhaps the world can be saved from this terrible disaster.

more...
Lisa Trundley-Banks's curator insight, August 5, 5:18 PM

Curing cancer surely has to be one of the biggest hopes we have from GE.