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Geo 400 Map

Geo 400 Map | Charlieography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


Via Seth Dixon
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

Here's the link the Professor Dixon's Interactive map.

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

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Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway

Stray Dogs Master Moscow Subway | Charlieography | Scoop.it

"Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you may notice that the commuters around you include a dog - a stray dog, on its own, just using the handy underground Metro to beat the traffic and get from A to B.  Yes, some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's immense and complex subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops."


Via Seth Dixon
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

This just shows how smart dogs really are. They see humans doing it, so they learn how to get around using the subways as well. They probably even get a free snack along the way! Just proves yet again why dogs are so much better than cats. You wouldn't find a cat taking the subway. They would think they're too good for that.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:46 PM

Dogs are creatures of habit. They get on at one stop and off at another every day or every so often. This is because there is an abundance of stray dogs and since no one is taking them in, Moscow will continue to have interesting subway surfers among them.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:06 AM

Humans commonly think of themselves as separate from nature.  However, we very much are a part of it and animals, like these stray dogs, know it.  When dealing with something more powerful than yourself, you have to learn how to navigate the system in order to survive.  That is exactly what these dogs have done, literally and figuratively, by learning the complex subway systems in Moscow.  It is an example of how animals can adapt to their man-made surroundings and how persistent (the rest of) nature can be.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:51 PM

Every so often, if you ride Moscow's crowded subways, you notice that the commuters around you include a stray dog. Some of Moscow's stray dogs have figured out how to use the city's complicated subway system, getting on and off at their regular stops. The human commuters around them are so accustomed to it that they rarely seem to notice. As many as 35,000 stray dogs live in Russia's capital city. They can be found everywhere, from markets to construction sites to underground passageways, scrounging for food and trying to survive. Using the subway is just one of many strategies that they use to survive. Living in the streets in tough and these dogs know this better than some humans. What is most impressive about their dogs is their ability to deal with the Metro's loud noises and packed crowds, distractions that domesticated dogs often cannot handle.

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After more than 2 decades, U.S. recognizes Somalia

After more than 2 decades, U.S. recognizes Somalia | Charlieography | Scoop.it
For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has granted official recognition to the Somali government in Mogadishu.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

This is a good step for Somalia. They have finally kicked the terrorists out of their capital and have a recognizable government. Even though poverty and piratism still plagues this country of the Horn of Africa, they are making strides in the right direction. There is still much to be done. Hopefully they transform from a terrorist breeding ground into a prosperous country and active member of the global community.

 

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Hugo Chavez, influential leader with mixed record, dies at 58

Hugo Chavez, influential leader with mixed record, dies at 58 | Charlieography | Scoop.it
Hugo Chavez, the polarizing president of Venezuela, died Tuesday after a battle with cancer, said Vice President Nicolas Maduro.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

With Chavez having passed and the Castro family rule coming to an end, relations with both Venezuela and Cuba could see some drastic changes in the near future. Maybe the U.S. could gain two allies that once despised them, especially since Cuba relies mainly on Venezuela for its oil. In turn, Iran would lose a key ally if Venezuela allies itself with the U.S. With elections looming in just 30 days, the change of power in Venezuela will have global implications.

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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | Charlieography | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


Via Seth Dixon
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

You know the economy is bad in the U.S. when Mexicans don't even want in anymore. In fact, more Mexicans are now leaving the U.S. for Mexico than vice versa. Mexico is the 4th largest producer of cars in the world and their GDP is growing by 4%, twice as fast as Brazil and even the U.S. Maybe Americans should start heading down to Mexico for work. I know a lot of Rhode Islanders that could use jobs.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:18 PM

The facts about the "new" Mexico help in reasoning why less people are migrating.  The new Mexico looks hopeful and prosperous but when you read about the affects of the drug wars and violence, we see that there is still room for progress for the country in order to keep their citizens from leaving Mexico.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:17 PM

A few weeks ago, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics. That’s how you work toward the building of agreements. Unfortunately, it wasn't Barack Obama. It was Mexico’s Enrique Pena Nieto. One of the first things Pena Nieto did after assuming office was to announce a pact for Mexico, an ambitious set of reforms to raise taxes, increase competition and take on the teachers’ unions. While the world has gotten used to a torrent of images and news of drug-related violence from Mexico, another side of this country has been quietly developing. What we can learn from Mexico is that they are quite successful.  Mexico’s GDP is expected to grow by nearly 4 percent this year, twice as fast as Brazil or, for that matter, the United States. It is riding a manufacturing boom. Mexico is now the world’s fourth biggest producer of cars, according to the World Trade Atlas. Starting next year, new taxis in New York City will carry a “made in Mexico' label.” Mexico is also the world's top exporter of flat screen TVs. In fact, Mexico exports more manufactured products than all the other countries in Latin America combined. A major factor that comes into play is geography.  Sharing a border with the United States means heavy products are cheaper to transport across than if they were manufactured in, say, Asia. Nieto continues to inform us what we can learn from Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

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Drill reaches deep Antarctic lake

Drill reaches deep Antarctic lake | Charlieography | Scoop.it
A US attempt to drill into Lake Whillans, a body of water buried almost 1km under Antarctica, achieves its aim.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

This is pretty interesting. Lakes buried under nearly a half mile of ice, untouched for thousands of years. They remain liquid because of geothermal activity . I wonder what they will find...

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Geo 400 Map

Geo 400 Map | Charlieography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


Via Seth Dixon
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

Here's the link the Professor Dixon's Interactive map.

more...
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.

Scooped by Charlie Koppelson
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'Dozens killed' in Syria village

'Dozens killed' in Syria village | Charlieography | Scoop.it
At least 40 people were killed by pro-government gunmen in north-west Syria on Thursday, activists say, prompting opposition claims of a "massacre".
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

As violence continues in Syria, I wonder if or when Western countries will step in and support the rebels in Syria. Israel has said that the Syrian government used chemical weapons against the rebels, and now the U.S. is leaning towards that conclusion as well. However, Russia remains firm in their support of the Syrian government. The plight of the Syrian people continues yet it seems not garner the attention that North Korea gets by issuing threats. Something needs to be done in order to avoid much worse violence in Syria.

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Global warming is epic, long-term study says

Global warming is epic, long-term study says | Charlieography | Scoop.it
Global warming has propelled Earth's climate from one of its coldest decades since the last ice age to one of its hottest -- in just one century.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

It's hard to believe that some people still don't believe in global warming; or they believe in it but say it's natural and not man-made. If you take an environmental geoology class you will learn that the spike in temperature and green house gasses is unprecedented since the start of the industrial revolution. Ice records don't lie, yet some still refute these findings. Permafrost that has been frozen for thousands of years is melting, releasing even more ozone depleting greenhouse gases. This study states that in 2100, the global temperature average will be higher than it has ever been in our Earth's history. Today's global warming is irrefutably manmade, but if everyone doesn't accept that, changes in greenhouse gas emissions will never be made.

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In pictures: Rio de Janeiro's Carnival

In pictures:  Rio de Janeiro's Carnival | Charlieography | Scoop.it
Images from Rio de Janeiro's Sambadrome where Carnival reaches its climax with the second night of parades by the city's leading samba schools.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

Carnival has come and gone. Yet again, I failed to make the trip. I love parades and Carnival is the parade of parades. Just look at these pictures! Looks like a blast. Oh well, I guess I'll just have to settle for St. Patricks Day in Newport. One day, Rio! I'll be there!

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Census Dotmap

Census Dotmap | Charlieography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

This map is very useful in examining the distribution of people and geography in North America. It's easy to see that our once rural based country is completely dominated by cities, most of which are near the coast. It's fun to play around with as you can see where mountain ranges are as well as other topographic changes just by the concentrations of people, or lack there of.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 1, 2013 9:33 AM

This interactive dot distribution map of the United States 2010 census data has many great applications.  The conversation can focus on the symbology of the map (for example, this could lead to a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of dot distribution maps) or notice how certain physical landforms are visible for either their high or low population density.  One of the advantages of this map is that it uses census data at the block level.  This means that the user can visualize distinct scale-dependent patterns.  Sharp divisions (e.g.-urban vs. rural) might have less of a distinct edge as you zoom in.  

UPDATE: This map now includes Canadian and Mexican census data as well as the United States.


Tags: cartography, technology, mapping, visualization, population, density.

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For the U.N. and North Korea: Game On

For the U.N. and North Korea: Game On | Charlieography | Scoop.it
North Korea has responded to new Security Council sanctions condemning its December 12 rocket launch.
Charlie Koppelson's insight:

The author of this opinion states that this may just be "the shock needed to restart the six party talks". I don't think that the DPRK cares about what the UN thinks or even the next round of sanctions that will result from their latest provocations. The Korean Peninsula is about as tense as it could be without an all out war. Now, even China has turned their back on the DPRK. Don't be surprised if the U.S. takes military action rather than more UN backed sanctions.

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