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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | Character and character tools | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2:04 PM

In this scoop I was very interested in the predictions of percentage of population for the countries presented. Here we saw some very shocking results for countries such as Germany and Japan where we saw the overall pop. decrease. Also over the coarse of time one can see the decrease in the dependency ratio, likely caused by higher education in the medical field , along with women becoming more educated. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:52 PM

I. International Database for the US Census Bureau created graphs representing population estimates broken down by country, age, and year. These graphs show the population shifts over 35 years of major countries. 

 

II. Developed nations show a column shape with a pointed top. Developed nations have equal amounts of males and females, and have a higher population of 30-50 year olds. With a high number of middle aged people and a low number of elderly people, developed nations remain stable due to a stable birth rate and death rate. Developing countries have a pyramid shaped population, with many young people and few 50-100 years olds. This leads to a weak economy as their is high unemployment. Developing countries also have overall higher populations, which leads to poverty as their is a lack of resources. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:31 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION
This article depicts various population pyramids in developing, as well as developed countries. These pyramids show trends from the past, as well as predictions for the future (2050). With population pyramids, it is easy to understand how populations shift, as well as observe different trends on populations. I really like studying the information given to us by population pyramids, so this article is very important to me. This whole thing relates to historical trends and projections for the future. 

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The Next America

The Next America | Character and character tools | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

Via Seth Dixon
Character Minutes's insight:

Very interesting chart of how the demographics of U.S. Is changing.

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CB New Hire Onboarding's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:35 AM

"The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs." - Seth Dixon 

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 18, 2014 10:46 AM
The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:48 AM

The demographic shifts will most definitely have an impact on politics and economic opportunities. With as many 85 year olds as 5 year olds, we will see an increase in the need for health care and general overall care for the elderly. There will be more need for social security and retirement plans. While it is a good thing overall that life expectancy is increasing, it may create other issues.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Character and character tools | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.