changing role of women
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changing role of women
women and their roles change.
Curated by Airielle Sims
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Vocabulary

My vocabulary words

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Video

Video
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujayZ8Ub2SA&feature=youtu.be

 

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Full record for Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee (single images):

Full record for Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee (single images): | changing role of women | Scoop.it
Airielle Sims's insight:
Primary Document 3 Annotation: 1 This website was a photo primary document from a newspaper comic. 2 This comic is about women's suffrage (the right to vote). 3 This comic depicts the lady as helpless. 4 It looks like the men are jumping fences to get the helpless women, but that is not how they gained the right to vote at all. 5 So maybe Tennessee was trying to get women in their state to have rights.
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Primary Document

Primary Document | changing role of women | Scoop.it
LibGuides. U.S. History, 1920-1941 -- The Twenties & The New Deal -- History 332. Home.

 

Poster Primary Document

 


Airielle Sims's insight:

Annotation:

1 This poster was made in the state of Illinois.

2 This poster was from the State Director Campbell.

3 This poster was trying to get girls to take free classes.

4 The poster was propyganda in trying to get women to like different occupations and to take the opportunities to be promoted and get social security.

5 This poster was from the National Youth Administration.

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PARAGRAPHS

Paragraph 1:

Although a lot has changed, women’s rights have not stopped being conflicted. First, women rights to their money are still limited. Their money is limited because not every company want to hire a women, especially if they think it’s a mans job. Ex; construction, driving over the road, etc. Second, the men didn’t believe the women should work in the 1920’s. Some men today still believe that a women place is at home. Next, the women clothes today are totally different today from the 1920’s. Now women wear skirts, shorts, and dresses but not old fashion ones. The women could not show much skin in the 1920’s. Then, the men in 1920’s did not like for their women to drink alcohol. Today men still do not like for their women to drink heavily. It is very unattractive for a women to drink heavily like a man. Finally, the women didn’t have as much privacy as they would have liked. Today women have a right of their own privacy. There are no more mail checking, told what to wear, etc.
The change was very good because if there was not a change a lot of women would be killed or beaten because they wouldn't follow the rules.








Paragraph 2:


Women were conflicted in many ways, because the roles of women were changing. First, money was a very big issue. The women couldn’t make money because they were not allowed to work. Second, the work conditions were very limited if jobs were given to women. Men believed a women’s work place is in their own home. Next, the women clothes were so long their skin hardly showed. A lot of men didn’t want their women skin being seen by another man. Then, the schools were very limited and picky about who could enter the school. They didn’t want the women to get a education so the women were not allowed to go to school. If they went to school it was for a very brief period of time. Finally, women were not allowed to drink. The women could not smoke either. The men felt that they always was to be informed about their women doings. The women had no rights to their own private life. Every women has no right to privacy unless they were told.
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Vocabulary

Vocab words from primary documents
Airielle Sims's insight:

1.  Administration- The process or activity of running a business,organization,etc.

2 Occupations- A job or profession.

3 Security- State of being free from danger or threat. 

4 Promotion- Activity that supports or provides for the furtherance of a cause,venture, or aim. 

5 Offer- Present or proffer (spmething) for (someone) to accept or reject as desired. 

6 Interested- Having intrest or involvement. 

7 National- Of or relating to a nation; common to or characteristics of a whole nation.

8 Feminist- A person who support feminism.

9 Opposition- Resistance or dissent, expressed in action or argument.

10  Technicalities- Apoint of law or small detailof a set of rules. 

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Feminist News - Feminist Majority Foundation

Feminist News - Feminist Majority Foundation | changing role of women | Scoop.it
The Feminist Majority Foundation works for social and political and economic equality for women by using research and education to improve women's lives.
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Current Event Number 1

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Primary Document 2

Primary Document 2 | changing role of women | Scoop.it
magazine articles about woman's rights,womans suffrage articles,women's right to vote,1920s feminist upheaval,struggle for womens rights...

 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Amelia Bloomer (Literary Digest, 1922)

 

Airielle Sims's insight:

Annotation:

1 This primary document looks like women are bored at a dinner.

2 This is a primary document from a feminist magazine.

3 This looks like it is a magazine from France.

4 This was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

5 This was from the "Literary Digest" in 1922.

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Topic Website 1

The Roaring Twenties is a term sometimes used to refer to the 1920s, characterizing the decade's distinctive cultural edge in most of the major cities of the "west" for a period of sustained economic prosperity. French speakers dubbed it the "années folles" ("Crazy Years"),[1] emphasizing the era's social, artistic, and cultural dynamism. "Normalcy" returned to politics in the wake of hyper-emotional patriotism during World War I, jazz music blossomed, the flapper redefined modern womanhood, and Art Deco peaked. Economically, the era saw the large-scale diffusion and use of automobiles, telephones, motion pictures, and electricity, unprecedented industrial growth, accelerated consumer demand and aspirations, and significant changes in lifestyle and culture. The media focused on celebrities, especially sports heroes and movie stars, as cities rooted for their home team and filled the new palatial cinemas and gigantic stadiums. In most major countries women were voting for the first time. Finally the Wall Street Crash of 1929 ended the era, as the Great Depression set in worldwide, bringing years of worldwide gloom and hardship.[2]

The social and cultural features known as the Roaring Twenties began in leading metropolitan centers, especially Chicago, New Orleans, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia, Paris and London, then spread widely in the aftermath of World War I. Thus when Germany could no longer finance war reparations to the Allies (and they could not repay their loans to the U.S.), Washington came up with the Dawes Plan and Wall Street invested heavily in Germany, which repaid its reparations to nations that in turn used the dollars to pay off their war debts to Washington. By the middle of the decade, prosperity was widespread, with the second half of the decade later becoming known as the "Golden Twenties".

The spirit of the Roaring Twenties was marked by a general feeling of discontinuity associated with modernity and a break with traditions. Everything seemed to be feasible through modern technology. New technologies, especially automobiles, moving pictures and radio proliferated 'modernity' to a large part of the population. Formal decorative frills were shed in favor of practicality in both daily life and architecture. At the same time, jazz and dancing rose in popularity, in opposition to the mood of the specter of World War I. As such, the period is also often referred to as the Jazz Age.

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