HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs.
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Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) | K-6 Educational Resources | Board of Studies NSW

Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) | K-6 Educational Resources | Board of Studies NSW | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it
.. Educational Resources for Australian teachers and students, Kindergarten to Year 6 ..
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Scoop.it! site for K-6 HSIE

EDUP3002 Human Society and its Environment Assignment 1

 

Welcome to my Scoop.it! This site aims to curate a range of 5 excellent resources that are engaging and appropriate for use in a Stage 1 Primary Classroom. Content and focus is aligned with the current NSW Board of Studies HSIE Syllabus.

 

Outcome:

Time and Change CCS1.2 Identifies changes and continuities in the local community.

 

Subject Matter:

Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs.

 

Key Inquiry Questions:

What changes have and will experience in our lifetime and why?

What changed have occurred to our local area and the people in it over time?

What affect will our changes have on the future?

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Resource 2: Skwirk Human Society and its Environment Stage 1

Resource 2: Skwirk Human Society and its Environment Stage 1 | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it
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Resource 2: Skwirk Human Society and its Environment

Resource for Teachers and Students

 

Skwirk Online Education is an online learning environment that offers student based and teacher based resources. Content is aligned with the Australian curriculum. This Human Society and it’s Environment page provides information for Stage 1 students in written and video format. This is an interactive resource, which also has a range of on-topic games for consolidation of learning.

To explore changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs the teacher could obviously explore ‘Families- past and present’, ‘The Way We Were’ but also ‘Transport’.

 

Teaching Idea: Investigate the development of Transport to explore changes caused by changing needs.

Explore the different sections of the Transport chapter with students on the IWB. Watching either an animation or reading through the ‘Read Along’ information, explore ‘What is transport?’ Ask students, “How do you get to school?” Create a tally on the board of how students get to school. Watch the ‘Early Transport’ video, pausing to ask students questions. Emphasise how there was a lack of need for transport in the Early days as villages were small, but how that changed. Read about the ‘Benefits of Transport’ focussing on how the development of transportation allowed people to move things and travel places much faster, meaning more places and things became available to us, and making life easier. Ask students “How do you think your parents and grandparents, and even great grand parents got to school?” Students take a scaffold survey home and find out information from their families past experience. Encourage students to ask and bring in photos if their family has any. This information is shared as a class, and information is collated into a table under the headings “How I get to school” “How my parents got to school” “How my grand-parents got to school”. Select older photos of Australian transport from the National Library of Australia Website (http://trove.nla.gov.au/picture/result?q=transport) and share with students. Compare to modern day pictures. Watch animation or read through ‘Disadvantages of Transport’ to explore how with the changes in transport, our needs for future transport have changed (environmental and safety problems). Discuss with students how they think they could solve these problems.

 

Assessment strategies:

On an A3 piece of paper divided in half, students draw a picture (and annotate if capable) under the headings “How I get to school” and “How my grandparents got to school”.

Extension- Students could design and draw their form of transportation of the future to meet our present day needs (that are not already being met).

 

Excursion Idea:

Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum has a permanent Transport exhibition that allows students to “move along the kinds of vehicles that have shaped out way of life”. This exhibition shows not only how transportation has developed and evolved to suit our changing needs, but also how the transport we use individually changes over time to suit our personal needs (from a pram to a bicycle, to a car etc.). The exhibition web page (http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/exhibitions/transport.php#) includes a ‘walkthrough’ (a slideshow of images- which could also be used in the classroom if an excursion is not possible) and teachers notes to prepare teachers for the exhibition.

 

Indigenous perspective:

The Powerhouse also has a publication On the Move: A history of transportation in Australia that “explores the fascinating stories behind the many and varied forms of transport and travel in Australia from early Indigenous trade routes to the high-tech vehicles of the early 21st Century” which is useful for embedding an Indigenous perspective into this topic.

 

Global perspective:

This online flash presentation provides information about different types of transportation used around the world. For Australian students teacher would modify Slide 4 and point out Australia on the map rather than the United Kingdom. http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/geography/powerpoint/transportaroundworld.swf

 

Numeracy Strategy:

KLA link Mathematics Stage 1 Outcome- Ma1-17SP gathers and organises data, displays data in lists, tables and picture graphs, and interprets the results. Students could use the data collected from the class surveys (students gather data, and organise as a class with teacher’s scaffolding) and display the data in lists and picture graphs. Interpretation of the results should lead students to gain an understanding of development over time and how this means we all have a much greater access to different types of transportation to serve different purposes, compared to both our parents, and particularly our (great) grand parents.

 

Skwirk’s HSIE page for Stage 1 students promotes the three basic cognitive processing activities considered by Schellens and Valcke. The “presentation of new information” (Shellens & Valcke, 2005) is seen in the presentation of new facts for students in the animation and written text. Questioning in both the written and audio text prompts students to make connections with prior knowledge, and elaborate on these earlier ideas/new facts encouraging “explicitation”. Finally with the discussion of the disadvantages of transport, evaluation of this new content is encouraged, and students are encouraged to reflect on the content and what it means in a real life setting. Engaging in this resource as a whole-class with teacher led instruction would encourage a greater level of cognitive processing, if the teacher focussed on direct, structured questioning of students, but the resource itself certainly impacts students in this way on its own.

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups:what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behavior, 21,

957-975. 

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Resource 4: People and the environment | Global Education

Resource 4: People and the environment | Global Education | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it
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Resource 4: People and the Environment- Global Education

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE RESOURCE

Resource for Teachers

 

This resource is made up of Seven Activities that allow students to investigate how people use and affect the environment, and the changes this creates. Links are made explicitely with the Australian Curriculum. Through this unit students develop key understandings of our dependence on the environment including our use of natural resources for energy, how human activities affect the environment and why it is important to protect and preserve the variety of life on earth.

 

Teaching idea:

This resource is a comprehensive teachers guide to teaching this unit of study. It includes inquiry questions, discussion questions, whole-class and individual student tasks as well as a range of different tasks at each stage of the investigation. When introducing this topic (Activity 1: Environments Around the World) I would show a video to engage, intrigue and excite students after handing around the globe and talking about the world. An example of a video that depicts some amazing environments in our world is “What an Amazing World!” http://youtu.be/DQLIyJbivxk The images mentioned in this Activity could be displayed in the classroom. Activity 2. Peoples impact on places uses Jeannie Baker’s Window and Home (nice link to Resource 3). The concept of change in these environments due to both human and natures impact should be emphasised as the focus of the unit to explore changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. If only focussing on this dot point I would finish the unit after Activity 4. However by continue to work through the following three resources you could establish fantastic links with a Science Unit of work (ecosystems etc.).

After investigating environmental change on a global scale, students should be encouraged to look out their classroom window and see what is happening in their school.

 

Inquiry questions:

What changes are occurring in our school environment?Are they positive or negative?What can we do to make them positive?

 

Explore the above questions in a class discussion. Share with them examples (for example, the paint on the walls outside the Year 3 classroom is cracked and keeps falling off onto the students in ‘no hat no play’ and is making a mess).

 

Assessment strategy:

In small groups students further explore the idea of “What can we do to make the changes in our school environment positive?” Students create an “Action Plan” a drawing of what they think needs to be done. Students can then annotate in any form of notation. Groups then present to the class their Action Plan Poster.

 

Ausaid explains that a global perspective should be adopted in the classroom as amongst other reasons, it provides an opportunity to explore important themes such as change, it is an approach which takes into account the whole of human society and the environments, creates an emphasis on the future, the dynamic nature of human society, a focus on cooperative learning and action, and shared responsibility, and finally an emphasis on critical thinking and communication (Ausaid, Australian Government, 2011, pp.4). It is important in the world today, that students are aware of the impact of globalisation through global education, embedding an understanding of the complex social, economic and political links between people and the impact that changes have on others (Ausaid, Australian Government, 2011, pp. 5). This aligns with the curriculum and explicitly with this dot point, and is increasingly important for teachers to engage with as our world is (and will only become more) so closely interconnected.

 

Global Perspectives- A framework for Global Education in Australian Schools Australian Government, Ausaid. 2011 Australia, Education Services Australia

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Resource 1: My Place Website

Resource 1: My Place Website | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it

This My Place website is where you and your family can explore one place on earth 
and the kids who have lived there since time began. 

Like the television series and the book, this site is filled with people, places and objects, 
each with their own special story. It’s a way to have fun with the changing face of time.

Sarah Donnelley's insight:

Resource 1: My Place Website

Resource for Teachers and Students

 

The My Place Website is an interactive resource based on the ABC’s My Place television series. The website explores the stories of children who have lived in one place in Australia since the beginning of time. Students can explore the stories of the children lived in the same place, but have very different stories, sharing very different experiences, due to the time when they lived. The changes over time in the children’s way of life emphasise to student’s changes both past and present, caused by changing needs.

 

Teaching ideas:

Introduction: Show students the opening website animation. Ask students what they think the website could be about? Set up a timeline on the white board and discuss its meaning with students. Explore different characters on the website, starting with the most recent and working backwards in time. As a class talk about the characters and explore their spaces.

Activities: Discuss with class the idea of different people living in the same place over time. Ask students to compare and contrast some of the stories of the characters on the website. Do a then/now brainstorm.

 

Talk about characters costumes. How have they changed and why?

If technology is available, students use iPad ap Skitch to create their own picture book using photos of their home (dictate what they want to say about it and record in the caption feature). Extension students can write down the sentences to go with the pictures.

Students create a short recount of their own life. Teacher scaffolds recount, creating one about them as a class before students then work individually to fill out a scaffold after brainstorming who they live with and what ‘their place’ has or is like. “My name is _________ . And this is my place.” Students draw a picture of their home. “There is…” Students may use words or pictures to finish the sentence. These recounts are then presented on a tree in the classroom with a picture of the students. (Modification of a lesson idea posted in the Our Place Forum by Chelsea (http://forum.myplace.edu.au/topic43-classroom-display--tree.aspx).

 

Students complete a short questionnaire with their parents and grandparents (or an elderly person they know) about ‘Their Place’. In a circle students share the aural histories with the class. Discuss differences between how it was then, and how it is now.

Discuss the idea of a personal history with class, and the concept that we will experience changes over our lives due to our own personal changing needs. Highlight the importance of these activities recording our personal experience now, so that we can compare it with the future, or perhaps share it with our descendants. Discuss the difference between our relatives personal history and our own.

Read Nadia Wheatley’s book My Place with students and complete a “Then and Now” chart during the second reading, teacher pointing out pictures on the pages that are appropriate and relevant to Stage 1 students (e.g. differences in transport, dress, toys). Following reading, discuss whether these changes are positive or negative. Watch the ABC’s My Place television series http://www.myplace.edu.au/behind_the_scenes/clip_bank/clip_bank_landing.html for consolidation. Pause film and allow students to ask questions, or recognise differences and then record differences in “Then and Now” table.

 

Associated Teachers’ resources:

My Place for Teachers (teachers resource to support teachers using the My Place series in the classroom) http://www.myplace.edu.au/default.aspWalker Books Classroom Ideas ‘My Place’ by Nadia Wheatley (Notes prepared by Nadia Wheatley for Walker Books to give teachers ideas of how to use her picture book in the classroom) http://www.walkerbooks.com.au/statics/dyn/1218001059961/My-Place-Classroom-Ideas.pdfOur Place Forum (forum for teachers to share ideas and experiences about using My Place in the classroom) http://forum.myplace.edu.au/default.aspxpart of the My Place Teacher Resource Website

 

Assessment strategies:

Students create a page for a class version of My Place called ‘Our Place’. Using Book Press an iPad ap (if the technology is available, or creating a collage on an A3 piece of paper) students use images/drawings of their house and write about their place (at appropriate ability level).

Teacher keeps running record when students share oral histories and ask questions of students (understanding of then and now, past and present, how things have changed).

 

Indigenous perspective:

An Indigenous perspective is inherent in this resource with a focus on Indigenous characters over time, and also a focus on historical events linked to Indigenous affairs, government policy and public attitudes. The My Place for teachers site includes a page focussed on promoting an Indigenous perspective using this resource, presenting clips and stills from the series, teaching activities and associated student activity sheets.

Read A is for Aunty by Elaine Russel (picture book) from ABC books. During reading, create a “Then and Now” chart as done for My Place (book or television series). For example, Then- Billy Carts and Now- Bikes and Scooters.

Use Skwirk HSIE Stage 1 Resource (see Resource 2) Families Past and Present and focus on ‘How we can learn about our past?’ and ‘Oral History’ the importance of oral history, how Aboriginal people have been sharing oral histories through stories forever, learn about the Dreamtime.

 

Global perspective:

Ask students if they or their parents/grand parents were born in another part of the world, and if they would like to share it with the class, write them up on the board. When discussing “Then and Now” perhaps there are some cultural differences that students or the teacher can share with the class.

Literacy Link:

English Stage 1 Syllabus- EN1-11D responds to and composes a range of texts about familiar apsects of the world and their own experiences.

Develop and apply contextual knowledge-

Discuss how depictions of characters in print, sound and images reflect the contexts in which they were created.Recognise simple ways meaning in text is shaped by perspective.

Respond to and compose texts-

Compose simple print, visual and digital texts that depict their own experience.

Develop students’ picture book works further with focus on print text. Discuss importance of perspective and structure in texts. Whose perspective are the My Place stories from? How does this affect the audiences understanding?

 

Shared in a collaborative learning environment this resource allows students to as learners “engage actively in cognitive processing in order to construct mental models based on their individual experiences” (Schellens & Valcke, 2005, pp. 959). Exploring the stories of others, the charcters in the My Space resource, creating connections and making comparisons between their own lives and the memories of their families, and sharing that with other students, all the while retrieving information from both their long term and short term memories, invokes an exchange that Schellens & Valcke (2005) argue “reflect a richer base for the further cognitive processing at individual level”.

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups:what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behavior, 21,

957-975. 

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Resource 3: Sydney Living Museums

Resource 3: Sydney Living Museums | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it

Our programs give students of all ages opportunities to explore a diverse range of historical and contemporary issues and themes in authentic contexts.

Linking curriculum outcomes and priorities to immersive experiences in original historical settings, our programs bring to life a remarkable group of people, events and places.

A central feature of all our programs is the use and evaluation of primary and secondary sources as a foundation for developing content knowledge, skills, literacies, values and attitudes that are critical to academic learning and to social and civic life. Our programs immerse students in experiences that are active, imaginative, critical and reflective.

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Resource 3: Sydney Living Museums

Resource for Teachers

 

The Sydney Living Museums Website outlines Educational programs and provides resources and learning opportunities for teachers to share with their students. Stage 1 programs “transport students back in time to develop understandings of the past and present through direct experience. As they do lessons or drills in an 1880s schoolhouse… wash clothes, go shopping or plant seeds, students compare their own lives with the lives of children and their families in the past”. This website presents 6 excursions/programs designed for Stage 1 students, which all have a strong emphasis on experiential learning using historical artefacts and technologies, costumed interpretation and imaginative recreation. The emphasis on creating an authentic experience for students to experience the past to truly identify and understand how things have changed, will deepen their understanding of changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. The website outlines the excursions, including Key Information, Curriculum Links (NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum K-10) risk assessments, maps, and introductory resources for teachers to use with students (for example. http://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/sites/default/files/SP_The_way_we_were_2011_compr.pdf ). Furthermore the website also offers online, virtual excursions, for schools who cannot afford to go on the excursion, or are simply too far away to travel there (http://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/education/virtual-excursions ).

 

Teaching idea:

Whilst all of the programs outlined on this site are relevant to the teaching of the topic, for the purpose of this annotation I will use ‘Childsplay’ and ‘How does your garden grow’ as they are located at Vaucluse House which is in my local area. Students learn about what it was like to live at Vaucluse House for the wealthy Wentworth family between 1827 and the early 1860s. The students explore how the different members of the household lived and make comparisons with their own lives today.

As well as sharing the ‘Excursion Introductions’ with students, I would share with them some information about the Wentworth family to try and establish context. If the class had looked at the My Place resource I would revisit the corresponding character in time, and establish for students an idea of when in time the Wentworth’s lived in the house. Develop an understanding of students prior knowledge, and create links between what students have already learnt and what they may learn, to encourage cognitive processing. A brainstorm of ‘What we might see/hear or learn on our excursion’ would be completed as a class to encourage students enthusiasm about the excursion and get them engaging and thinking about the topic.

 

Key inquiry questions for the excursion:

How has family life changed or remained the same over time?How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the past?Why have these changes occurred?

 

I would approach all programs in a similar way, establishing prior knowledge, making connections between what they know and what they expect to gain from the excursion. Students would have a simple, stage appropriate worksheet to fill out while on the excursion (or participating in the virtual excursion) to encourage note taking (students may be asked to draw pictures, write downs names etc.). When returning to class, straight after the excursion students would have a debrief session with the teacher, where students should share the oral histories they collected during the program.

Whilst in Vaucluse house, have students sit around one particular window looking out into the front garden. Ask students what they can see through the window. Ask students to imagine what the Wentworth family may have seen out that window, and what people have seen over time since then, through the very same window they are looking through.

At school, read Jeannie Baker’s Window with students http://www.jeanniebaker.com/focus_web/window_on_a_changing_world.htm During a shared reading of the book, ask students to point out changes from each page to the next. Ask students to think back to the excursion when they sat around the window and looked out. Why do these changes happen in the same place? Ask students to think about looking out their window at home, and what might have changed in that view over time.

 

Assessment strategy:

After learning about the narrative structure and language features (how to write a narrative) in literacy lessons, students write a narrative reflecting on the excursion and what they learnt demonstrating their understanding through experience. The teacher can collect as a portfolio task.

 

Indigenous perspective:
I would contact my local AECG Committee to find out localised information about Aboriginals in the schools area, and work to establish connections with the community. Website- http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/regions/committees/eastern-suburbs Contact- Pauline Beller (President) pauline.beller@det.nsw.edu.au or Jane Stanley (Secretary) jane.stanley@det.nsw.edu.au (current contacts listed on AECG website, 21st May, 2014). By inviting a member of the community into my classroom I would like students to be able to look out the window (or in the absence of a window, just look out) and imagine the same window from an Indigenous perspective. How may they see things differently? What changes would they have endured in their lives.

 

Literacy Strategy:

Visual literacy. In small groups (or as a class) construct a story using print to accompany the pictures. Students could use the iPad application Skitch, and record their story to accompany the pictures (that the teacher would import into the application) if they are not at the level to write their annotations.

 

KLA Link:

Creative Arts- Students could create a visual representation of what they see through their window. Students are each given a cardboard window frame (on an A3 piece of paper) and have to fill it in using collage. Alternatively students could create a storyboard type artwork, depicting 6 views out their window over their lifetime.

 

This resource promotes task-oriented communication between students, their teacher and the experts (Indigenous community members and excursion leaders) and aligns with Schellens and Valcke’s (2005) consideration of the three basic cognitive processing activities involved with Computer Supported Collaborative Learning environments. In an exciting, imaginative, informal setting I believe students would engaging in a lot of talk, sharing new information with each other. Activities, or lessons led by the experts or teacher would engage the students in more focussed communication where further refining of the ideas they have established during their collection of information would occur. Finally as students write about their experience, engage with creating their window through words and artwork, and learn about Aboriginal Australians in their local area to encourage an ability to imagine the world through their eyes, students may argue, question, reason, and justify their decisions for representations and their understandings demonstrating evaluation of their learning through communication. 

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups:what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behavior, 21,

957-975. 

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Resource 5: Twelve Canoes

Resource 5: Twelve Canoes | HSIE Inquiry Learning Stage 1: Changes, both past and present, caused by changing needs. | Scoop.it
12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
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Resource 5: Twelve Canoes Website

ABORIGINAL/TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PERSPECTIVE RESOURCE

Resource for Teachers and Students

 

Twelve Canoes is a website and DVD presentation of twelve linked short audio-visual pieces, some companion short videos to these twelve stories, 120 photographs and art pieces, and music files, that together paint a compelling portrait of the people, history, culture and place of the Yolngu people, whose homeland is the Arafura Swamp of north-central Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. While Twelve Canoes is specifically about the Yolngu people of Arnhem Land, each of the 12 segments can be used as a starting point to help students develop ideas and hypotheses about aspects of all Indigenous people’s history in Australia. This resource is incredibly comprehensive, and authentic, and most importantly incredibly engaging, and I believe is a fabulous way to imbed an Indigenous perspective within this area of the curriculum.

 

Teaching ideas:

As mentioned above, this resource focuses on the Yolngu people of Arnhem land, but as emphasised by Cate Smyth (lecture, 26th March, 2014), it is essential to localise Indigenous knowledge when trying to embed an Indigenous perspective within the curriculum. Thus I would use this resource as the introductory to this unit. Teacher would show the ‘Our Ancestors’ clip, pausing to discuss elements of the visual and audio with students. The teacher could then show nowadays, and take a similar approach, then asking critical questions of students to encourage their comparison of the two clips. As a class, a “Then and Now” table could be filled out on the IWB (as was done in the My Place lesson). The teacher could select and use picture trails to show change and continuity using different text types (http://trove.nla.gov.au/general/australian-pictures-in-trove) for topics such as Indigenous art and play over time.

The teacher should contact their local AECG member and invite them or someone they can recommend to work with the teacher and the students to embed a localised Indigenous perspective. Work with local community members (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal) to create an oral history of the area. Discuss how and why things have changed.

Waverley council (my local area) produced a document due to a high demand of enquiries regarding the Aboriginal history of the Waverley Council area. Meadows (1998) found that information was minimal and resources were scattered, but this research paper draws some interesting conclusions. Particularly interesting for Stage 1 students may be the rock carvings “at the Bondi Golf Course, Ben Buckler Reserve and the coastal walk at Mackenzie’s Point” (Meadow, 1998, pp. 2) see http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/8659/Aboriginal_History_of_the_Waverley_Area_NEW.pdf Share a map of the area with students and talk about the Indigenous people who were local to the area.

Picture books such as Marngrook illustrated by Grace Fielding and Our World, Bardi Jaawi, Life at Ardiyooloon by the One Arm Point Remote Community School should be read to students to give them an understanding of the similarities of their lives and Indigenous kids their age all over Australia.

It would also be important to discuss with students what oral histories are, and the importance of oral histories for Indigenous peoples. Here you could link to dreamtime stories. Dreamtime should always be shared by an Indigenous person (Aboriginal Education Policy), but the ABC’s Dust Echoes interactive website would be a great resource to explore as a class or by students individually (http://www.abc.net.au/dustechoes/default.htm) and it includes ‘study guides’ classroom resources for teachers.

 

Further teacher resources-

A Shared History, Currculum Support document, Teaching ideas Stage 1, Change and Continuity (http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/shared/sonechange.htm) Alligned with the current NSW HSIE syllabus, this resource offers some great lesson activities and useful resources for teaching this subject matter with an Indigenous perspective.Twelve Canoes Study Guide (http://www.12canoes.com.au/downloads/studyguide/Twelve_Canoes_Study_Guide.pdf) provides activities, information about the project and the artists, and ways to explore each segment.The Barani Sydney’s Aboriginal History website is an excellent resource. The Timeline would be beneficial to use with Stage 1 students to build an understanding of what a timeline is, and contextualise the new information they have been collecting (http://www.sydneybarani.com.au/timeline/).

 

Excursion idea:

Take students exploring in Bondi Beach to look at the rock painting. Indigenous community member could lead the journey and perhaps share dreamtime stories along the way.

 

Assessment strategy:

Teacher records observations of student participation and engagement in class discussions. As a class create a “History of Our Place”, in small groups students are each given an area/topic/person/place they have learnt about, and together draw a picture and write about what they have learnt. Each ‘chapter’ is photocopied and put together by a teacher to created a Big Book, or uploaded onto a section in the class blog (if technology is available).

 

Global perspective:

Explore the histories of Indigenous peoples all over the world on the United Nations CyberSchoolbus website (http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/indigenous/index.asp) a fantastic resource filled with resources for teachers and activities for students.

 

This resource was created when filmmaker Rolf de Heer was collaborating with Indigenous Yolngu people of Ramingining to devise a storyline for his 2006 film Ten Canoes. There was simply too much material, with wide ranging subject matter, that was brought in for discussion. Individual community members were very keen to have all of their ideas incorporated, so that they film would in some way reflect the entirety of their lives, culture and history. It was soon realised that due to such great interest and involvement from the community, it would be impossible for one film to achieve all that, and thus the idea of the website was born. The twelve subject areas were decided on, and incorporate works of art, video material, stills, music and sound. Most are accompanied by the words from and voices of different Ramingining storytellers. Using the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003) to evaluate this resource, I believe it to be authentic, accurate and supported by the local Ramingining Aboriginal community, was created through Aboriginal participation and does exclude content of a secret or sacred nature. What I like the most about this resource is that material is presented by an authentic voice, written and spoken by the Yolngu people, which makes the material far more meaningful. 

 

NSW Department of Education and Training (2003) Aboriginal Education K-12- Resource Guide, NSW.

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