The contribution of people and associated places and events to community heritage
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ABC TV: Captain Cook - early_years - 1

ABC TV: Captain Cook - early_years - 1 | The contribution of people and associated places and events to community heritage | Scoop.it
Marissa Sivalingam's insight:

Although Australia was already occupied by the Indigenous people of Australia, Captain James Cook “discovered” and claimed Australia on behalf of the British. This move shaped Australia and therefore Sydney into what we know it today. As a person who was instrumental in helping form the Sydney community into what we see now, students should understand the different aspects of his life. This interactive website allows users to explore the life experiences of Captain James Cook. It shows all the countries he sailed to and claimed as well as discusses other achievements such as observing the transit of Venus on the First Voyage. The information is laid out in an easily accessible format where students can click on particular stages of Cook’s life and roll their mouse over particular milestones to find basic information on it. Clicking the milestone will reveal more details about the event that can inform the reader or lead to further research.

 

Students can be split into five groups, and each group can become the expert of one stage of Cook’s life (e.g. Early life, Navy career etc). After using the website and other approved websites to understand their given topic more clearly, students will then reorganise themselves into new groups, each consisting of one member from each expert group to share their information. They will then compile this into a poster using whatever format they wish and this can be displayed around the classroom.

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Make a Sydney Opera House collage - YouTube

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Marissa Sivalingam's insight:

The Sydney Opera House is one of the most iconic buildings in Sydney. It is an important asset to the community as it provides a venue for some of the best examples of the Arts that Australia has to offer and is in international icon, as well as being on the world heritage list. The video in this scoop shows how to make an Opera House collage.

 

Students will discuss famous buildings or parts of Sydney before watching the video. They will then use the video to compile a procedure as a class. Students will be provided with a range of additional art and crafts materials to decorate their opera house. After making their collages, students will individually research the Opera House. They are to find out who designed it, when it was built and how it is important to the Sydney community. They should also find out where it has played a significant role in national or international events (such as the 2000 Olympics or the 2013/2014 New Year firework display). They will then create a short paragraph reflecting information they feel is important and attach it to their collage. 

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:34 AM

How to make a national icon!

Jennifer May's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:55 PM

I like this idea but I'd throw in some maths - using a protractor to draw the circles on scrap paper/cardboard/newspaper, then cutting the sails out from that.  : )

 

Hye-In No's curator insight, April 11, 2015 7:54 AM

This is a very simple yet fun craft task that students can complete in a short time span and is a great way to introduce the topic of significant built features of Australia to students. The Opera House is one of the most renowned features not only by Australian but recognised by the world. By beginning a unit about built environments with a practical task can stimulate great discussion and allow students to be more interested in the topic itself. In Stage 2, it is the first time that they are requried to name and describe significant buildings of Australia as before this, there is only a focus towards their immediate environment. Therefore discussion and becoming familiar with such buildings in imperative for students, especially those beginning Stage 2.

 

Graves (1990) states that the best way to teach about the built environment in the curriculum is by integrating it with 'existing curriculum patterns' (p.3). Rather than spoon feeding information about the built environment to students straight away, by linking Visual Arts, students will be encouraged to naturally learn and become inquisitive about such features in a fun and practical way. This Opera House making task will be perfect as students will have something personal to relate to; their very own Opera House! Teachers can further investigate the Opera House with the students to go in more depth as well.

 

References:

 

Graves, G. (1990). Teaching about the built environment. ERIC digest Publications Manager, ERIC

Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education, 2805 East Tenth Street, Suite 120, Indiana

University, Bloomington, IN 47408. 

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Eora: mapping Aboriginal Sydney, 1770-1850

Eora: mapping Aboriginal Sydney, 1770-1850 | The contribution of people and associated places and events to community heritage | Scoop.it
Why are artworks viewed as important sources of historical information? In this clip, you will see a range of artworks...
Marissa Sivalingam's insight:

This particular site is very useful in helping students understand the lives of the Gadigal people of the Eora nation both before and after the arrival of the British. The 5 minute video gives students an insight as to how the Eora people used Sydney’s waterways and helped shape that aspect of the Sydney community. It also discusses three prominent Aboriginal people during the Colonial Era. The video helps gives students a “taster” of how life was in Sydney from 1770 to 1850.

 

The website also gives some “things to think about” as part of viewing the video. One of the ideas mentioned is creating a timeline that discusses the effects of colonisation on the Eora nation's people. As a possible lesson or activity stemming from this resource, the students could create this timeline as a class, then break off into groups to research further into a particular event. They would then present this information to the class and add their research to the timeline to create a more complete understanding of the events of the time. This activity also addresses Stage 2 Writing and Representing English outcomes as students are required to create an informative text for a particular audience (NSW DEC: English K-6, 2012).

 

 

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History of the British Empire - YouTube

Marissa Sivalingam's insight:

Australia was one of many countries that was colonised by the British. This video discusses Britain’s progression around the world in a comedic way and discusses their successes and losses during the World Wars. It also introduces the idea of the benefits of globalisation such as trading and the introduction of new foods or materials such as sugar or cotton.

 

Students could use this clip as a stimulus for a Hot Seat drama activity. One student could assume the role of the Queen, and explain why it was beneficial for her country to “conquer” other countries. Another student could assume the role of a native person from Africa or India and give the opposing point of view. The students would ask the indigenous person how they feel about the British taking over their country and give the class reasons why it could be a good or a bad thing. This role could be taken by a few different students, as not everyone would have reacted the same way to the arrival of the British fleets. They could also discuss ways the British people might have achieved a similar outcome (the ability to trade goods with other countries) without having a negative effect on the native peoples. This activity would help students understand that the impact the British forces had on Australia when they first arrived was felt in other countries around the world as well. This activity addresses the relevant HSIE syllabus subject matter which aims to help students understand the various consequences of British colonisation and form "their own informed opinions" on the topic (NSW DEC: HSIE K-6, 2012).

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Bungaree - Barani

Bungaree - Barani | The contribution of people and associated places and events to community heritage | Scoop.it
Marissa Sivalingam's insight:

This site introduces students to one of the prominent Eora people of the colonial period, Bungaree. It discusses the work he did to help mediate Indigenous and settler interactions and support his people during the early years of settlement. It also briefly touches on the topic of brass breastplates and how, while they were relatively well-intentioned, they really only demonstrated a lack of understanding on behalf of the British of Aboriginal customs.

 

Students could find out more about prominent Eora people who helped shape the early Sydney community. If this lesson was carried out after the previous lesson which looked at the broader Eora nation from 1770-1850, students would have already been briefly exposed to people like Bungaree, as well as Pemulwuy and Ricketty Dick. Students could research these figureheads, or any other from the Sydney region in partners or individually (individual projects would be more suitable to late-Stage 2 studets) (NSW DEC: HSIE K-6, 2012). They will be asked to find out specifically how their chosen person contributed to the shaping of Sydney. This information could be presented in a poster form and used as an assessment item. As students are required to create a text that informs an audience on their given person, this would apply to relevant Stage 2 English ‘Writing and Representing’ outcomes as well as the required ‘Change and Continuity’ outcomes(NSW DEC: English K-6, 2012; NSW DEC: HSIE K-6, 2012).

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