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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Fight the Nine Symptoms of Corporate Decline

Fight the Nine Symptoms of Corporate Decline | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How to know if your organizational culture is turning toxic, and what to do about it. 


The good news is that they are all reversible.


Excerpts:


The signs that there is more trouble ahead:


Communication decreases.  Decisions are made in secret. People mistrust official statements.


Criticism and blame increase.  Scapegoats are sacrificed. Self-doubt is masked by attack. External forces are blamed, personal responsibility avoided.


Focus turns inward. People become self-absorbed and lose sight of the wider context — customers, constituencies, markets, or the world.


Rifts widen and inequities grow. Internal rivalries escalate. Power differentials and social distance between groups and levels make collaboration difficult. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Rosabeth Moss Kanter's post features research from her book, Confidence. It's worth a look, if for nothing else than to better deal with that pervasive "culture eats strategy for lunch" quote. ~ D

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Building Commitment During an ERP Rollout

In this e-book, Luc Galoppin and Daryl Conner bring together their insights on commitment and social architecture. Learn how the eight stages of commitment apply to an ERP rollout and why it is crucial to carefully plan the moments-of-truth.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Daryl Conner's commitment curve is handily illustrated with sketch designs notes, thanks to Luc and Daryl's ebook style Slideshare.  It's a useful reference for any change project, including but not limited to an ERP rollout.  ~  Deb

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Convergence: Two paths join in the History of Change Management?

Convergence:  Two paths join in the History of Change Management? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
To understand change management as we know it today, you need to consider two converging and predominant fields of thought: an engineer's approach to improving business performance and a psychologist's approach to managing the human-side of change.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Accessible models and well-known authors are cited in this overview of the convergence of the engineering  side of change (also project management) and the psychology of change (human factors.)  


A different historical perspective contrasts this view in the next post.


"For the past decade, organizational change researchers have argued that individual responses are more complicated than a binary response (Piderit, 2000; Rafferty, Jimmieson, & Armenakis, 2012)."



 Which one fits your conceptualization of change today? ~  D

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Do you Need Change Management with that, Project Managers?

Do you Need  Change Management with that, Project Managers? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"How to use the right tools for the job - determining when comprehensive Change Management is essential - along with Project Management."


Gail has a track record of robust, detailed posts on the many facets of change management, including the project management combo - more than, "do you want fries with that?"


Here are some highlights on the pairings of CM and PM in her blog post from awhile back exploring conflicts between the two disciplines.


Excerpted:

__________________________

        

When employee discretion can impact ROI [so you] need employee commitment, then projects benefit from Change Management.

__________________________


Determining “how much CM and what forms should it take” is not a scoping exercise for a PM.  This requires an experienced CM practitioner with an array of assessment tools (that analytical minds can relate to) and a truckload of integrity and communication skills (and an enlightened leader with long term commitment to the organization). 


When employee discretion can impact ROI, i.e. you cannot drive 100% of the benefits through compliance but need employee commitment, then projects benefit from CM. 

 

  • PMs serious about considering CM in a transformational change will provide for a professional CM Risk Assessment in the planning phase [to] provide data to inform discussions and decision making.
   
  • [Get] ROI anchored and...defined scope of the project. 
   
  • Without adequate People Change Management, [and] ... Program Management, transformational projects are not actually “finished”.  
   
  • PM and CM partnering and a tangible commitment to [stay] with the roll out long enough...ensures benefits realization.


Click the title to view the full article in context.


Change Management may also include large group events that can make or break a successful realization of a change project.  


Offering traditional meetings, including virtual, as well as alternative formats, like agenda-less meetings such as "Open Space" can refresh and bring new energy to a tired implementation process.


Here are several samples from Deb on alternative meeting formats for successful implementations:

   

   

   

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Case Studies on "Shared Services" Change Projects from Deloitte Consulting

Case Studies on "Shared Services" Change Projects from Deloitte Consulting | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The shift toward shared services, as a means to cut costs and improve quality is well underway.  Case studies from Deloitte on 'Getting it together.'"


Here's a helpful resources page from the Deloitte folks that links to downloadable articles.


  • Theory:  " giving business units deeper support and let more people focus on what they do best.
  • In practice, it takes serious planning, coordination and hard work to realize those benefits."


Cases listed include:


Helping a large non-profit organization and its chapters embrace efficiency to do more good.

Features:

  • getting people throughout the organization to understand and embrace the changes. 
  • extensive training. 
  • tailored messages to stress the additional good people would be able to do if the organization were more efficient with its resources. 
  • pilot tests demonstrated this level of improvement was not only idealistic, but realistic
  • performed a feasibility assessment including practitioners from manufacturing operations, finance, strategy, technology, capital markets, organization and talent and total rewards service areas.

_______________________

One of the results:  more consistent medical benefits, increased employee participation and allowed for $12 million dollars in annual savings.
_______________________

  • improvements were designed and implemented including (example) offering more than 500 medical plans through more than 90 different providers, migrating all local health care plans to an enterprise-wide benefits program and creating a Center of Expertise benefits function integrated with human resources (HR) and payroll, to help simplify administration and reduce administrative resources, all while improving service levels. This approach generated more consistent medical benefits, increased employee participation and allowed for $12 million dollars in annual savings.

    

Insights:

  • How to establish and improve a shared services organization (SSO), based on the results of Deloitte’s 2011 global shared services survey results.

   

  • The other half of the shared services battle.

    

  • Sharing internal expertise.
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Change and Endings: Letting Go and Acceptance before New Beginnings

Change and Endings: Letting Go and Acceptance before New Beginnings | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Successful transition through endings is a necessary skill these days. A William Bridges classic gives insights into helping endings succeed." 


This is one of my own posts on a popular summary of Bridges' work on the differences between change and transition:


  • How to help endings be successful
  • Access to a downloadable Bridges model article
  • Get the strategies list for successful endings


Excerpts:


Sometimes an ending is a major, transformative revelation for a business, such as when CEO Darwin Smith exclaimed they needed to shut down the paper mills leading the shift to a new way of doing business.  


_______________________

"It isn't the changes that do you in, it's the transitions.


...Change is external, transition is internal."  


William Bridges


_______________________


Successful endings:

   

   
  • Allow you to enter the Neutral Zone (like the Black Forest) of transitions and change, according to William Bridges
   
Read the full article here.  The downloadable model is on Deb's TOOLS page here.
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 24, 2012 1:02 PM
Thanks for sharing this Harry. :-)
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Surprised by Resistance to a Desirable Change - Tutorial Series Tools

Surprised by Resistance to a Desirable Change - Tutorial Series Tools | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Prosci (ADKAR) is sharing online tutorials for change management, including this example of the second of a three part series focused on resistance management."
   
I'm intrigued by how Prosci uses the terms for change and resistance management, which they define in this tutorial series.  We'll be offering more soon on understanding motivations for resistance.   For now, we have Prosci's "resistance management" for comparison

   

Excerpts:

  

Steps for addressing resistance to a desirable change

   

1. Establish frameworks: There are two principles to consider: 
 

  • a) A desirable change doesn’t mean everyone will desire it, and 
  • b) Resistance does not always mean there is a lack of desire. 

 

2. Conduct root-cause analysis: There are personal and organizational contexts to change that can influence the speed of adoption, ultimate utilization and proficiency at a change on an individual level.

   

Includes examples such as:

  • Change A (email system change) includes,  “a lack of desire is not always the cause of resistance.” After further analysis, it has become apparent that the employee lacks the knowledge to effectively configure the new email system, though the desire to use the new system is in place.
   
  • Change B (office location change) – a transition state that is causing difficulties for the employee. Her behaviors appear to demonstrate that she doesn’t desire to move, but in reality she might just need more time to adjust and get settled.

   

  • Change C (benefits package change) – On the surface, the change seemed to be desirable because of its beneficial monetary impact on employees’ bonus checks. However, in the cited case, the change from quarterly payments to bi-annual is the source of resistance as it has disrupted a staff member's personal plans.
   

3. Develop approach for managing resistance: Prosci outlines Three avenues for managing resistance, including preventative, proactive and reactive resistance management.

   

Tactics for addressing resistance:

1. Engage key players

2. Be an advocate and coach

3. Employ reactive resistance management


Read the full article here.


Here are some posts by Deb on stakeholder events that involve everyone:

Open Space on Speed: Social Business with the Coaches, Results! Video
Trusted Advisors Open Space, Global Change ACMP 2012
Open Space & Renewal, AAHC Board Retreat Highlights 2012


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Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question? What's the Goal?

Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question?  What's the Goal? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The answers we get out of data will always depend on the questions we ask.


Useful.  It also reminded me of one of the tools we use in Whole Scale change thinking:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate, or DPPE.  Thanks to twitter follower  @resilientchange for this link this week.


_______________________________

"Throughout history ....science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

_______________________________



Excerpts:


Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.


One key role we play in the process is choosing which data to look at. That this choice is often made for us by what happens to be easiest to measure doesn't make it any less consequential, as Samuel Arbesman writes, 


  • "Throughout history, in one field after another, science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."


In his book,  political forecaster Nate Silver writes about a crucial element, how we go about revising our views as new data comes in.


Silver is a big believer in the Bayesian approach to probability, in which we all have our own subjective ideas about how things are going to pan out, but follow the same straightforward rules in revising those assessments as we get new information.


It's a process that uses data to refine our thinking. But it doesn't work without some thinking first.


Read the full article here.


Perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining via Reveln.


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Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Change leader competencies that also include mindsets. All can be developed."


This is a handy list worth reviewing from colleague Gail Severini. There's more to come, including a top-ten competencies for change agents those who are the focus of the change.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


Change Leaders' Competencies include:


1.  Determination and discipline - The leader …“Has a profound resolve toward the specific shifts the organization has identified as essential for its future success,...” And, has the personal discipline to ...ake difficult and challenging actions.


2.  Self-Knowledge and mindfulness - ...calm in the midst of high-stress, dynamic change. The ability to concentrate and be attentive to other people and concepts...are intricately connected.


6.  Integrative thinking - Once we accept that transformational change presents enormous ambiguity it becomes obvious that the ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”.


7.  Culture awareness - An understanding of the organization’s current and desired cultures [and] plans for making the shift.


10.  Make meaning - Making the change relevant to every resource who has to make the transition --the  unusual capability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, to ...help them ...navigate their way through it. 


Read the full post here.

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Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples

Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The HBR post cites several case studies illustrating why many transformations fizzle, then two examples for how to turn it around."


The cautionary tales, names removed, are listed first.  Then the positive stories follow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


______________________

   

But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

______________________


A health insurer demonstrates a repeated pattern of 3- to 5-year cycles where it launches a change program, takes awhile for managers to get behind it, and then more time to get it funded. A program gets funded for a year but then everyone loses interest, and it gets defunded and dies.


Recently they're failing faster; the three- to five-year cycle is moving to two to three years. But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.


Just about everyone in the company agrees the culture is dysfunctional:

   

  • Some point to politics - competition between the COO and CFO blocking each other's progress. 
  • The CEO also had a way of questioning and stress-testing people that discouraged risk-taking => a "play it safe" mentality.
  • Executives who want quick wins scope projects to be done in a year. Most change programs there needed multiple years, so by the time a program extends beyond year one, executives move onto a new initiative.


What countermeasures are there to break a tragic change cycle like this?


______________________

   

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.

______________________


Successful efforts at health insurance companies Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan offer insights:


Organizational realignment — The structure of an organization determines the incentives that drive identity, behavior, and employee understanding of roles and responsibilities and priorities, as well as a sense of ownership and accountability.


Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's tried a more traditional functional management structure but then found it lost customer focus.

  

  • It appointed leaders to run market segments with profit and loss responsibility with the focus of changing the product mix and improve profitability. 
  • By organizing by customer, cross-functional changes became much easier to implement, and there was a dramatic turnaround in business results.
   

Improvement methods — a platform for doing work nimbly and at low cost included:

  

  • Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture as employees are empowered  so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts. 
  • Tactics such as daily huddles drove immediate wins and helped entrench a culture of empowerment.


Employee engagement — Employees fundamentally want themselves and the company to be successful, so successful change agents listen to their needs and help them transition.


Aetna describes how new CEO John Rowe and the senior team "sought out employees at all levels — those who were well connected, sensitive to the company culture, and widely respected — to get their input on the strategy, design and execution of intended process changes."


Executives at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan went into the field to gather input and communicate their commitment to change. Employees were trained in improvement methods ("Lean"), with every employee going through two sessions in accountability training.


Curator: Enrich your perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing.


Contact Deb Nystrom here for an initial consultation, without obligation.

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Harry Cannon's comment, November 1, 2012 11:30 AM
See article in HBR Jul-Aug 2012 by Katzenback et al.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 3, 2012 8:10 PM
Thanks Harry. I appreciate the link.
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Stakeholder Mapping » Change Factory

Stakeholder Mapping » Change Factory | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Another handy concept and tool, Stakeholder mapping.


Via Blue Sky Change
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The Essence of Theory U and Presencing - Video Clip, the Blind Spot

"The Essence of Theory U and Presencing" - a clip of Otto Scharmer from Global Classroom Lecture 1: The Blind Spot.


I'm a fan of Theory U principles and concepts including Go Slow to Go Fast and dealing with the Blind Spot.  If you are unfamiliar with Theory U, here's a taste of a complex but not necessarily complicated body of work in change.


Via Kate Crisp
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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions

Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Reductionism [is useful] in understanding and managing the world around us.     However the possibility space is now expanding to higher levels of resolution such as a focus on complex systems. Learning and tools are ratcheting in lock-step.


Via juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a handy list for referencing complexity theory in a practical way.  Many change projects reference concepts mentioned here including non-linear dynamics, networks, chaos, fractals, and power laws.  ~ Deb

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Oversimplifying Change Management : A Historical View and Current Perspective

Oversimplifying Change Management :  A Historical View and Current Perspective | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Leaders, change practitioners and researchers often view organizational change through a dual lens: people either support or resist the change. This limited view of change management assures failure during the initial planning process.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is change really either / or - binary at the individual level?  Or does a full historical and practice perspective on change better fit into this perspective where change management is not a dichotomy?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 21, 2013 11:29 AM
Another view of Polarity Management is here: http://www.people-results.com/polarities-problem-solving-its-and-or-thinking/#.UP1rrqVfWO9 >> Polarity Partnerships spoke at the National OD Network conference and defined Polarities as “interdependent pairs that support a common purpose and one another. They are energy systems in which we live and work.”
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Change Useful: The Cynefin Framework helps with Complexity, Complex, Chaos and Simplicity

The Cynefin (play /ˈkʌnɨvɪn/) framework is used to describe problems, situations and systems. It provides a typology of contexts that guides what sort of explanations and/or solutions may apply. Cynefin is a Welsh word, which is commonly translated into English as 'habitat' or 'place', although this fails to convey its full meaning. A more complete translation of the word would be that it conveys the sense that we all have multiple pasts of which we can only be partly aware: cultural, religious, geographic, tribal etc. The term was chosen by the Welsh scholar Dave Snowden to illustrate the evolutionary nature of complex systems, including their inherent uncertainty. The name is a reminder that all human interactions are strongly influenced and frequently determined by our experiences, both through the direct influence of personal experience, and through collective experience, such as stories or music.

The Cynefin framework draws on research into complex adaptive systems theory, cognitive science, anthropology and narrative patterns, as well as evolutionary psychology. It "explores the relationship between man, experience and context"[1] and proposes new approaches to communication, decision-making, policy-making and knowledge management in complex social environments.

The Cynefin framework was originally developed in 1999 in the context of knowledge management and organisational strategy by Dave Snowden[2] It was originally a modification of Max Boisot's I-Space[3] combined with the study of actual, as opposed to stated management practice in IBM. By 2002 it had developed to include complex adaptive systems theory and had started to become a general strategy model.[4] It was then further developed and elaborated with Cynthia Kurtz as a part of their work with the IBM Institute of Knowledge Management (IKM).[5] Kurtz had worked with Snowden as a part of an IBM special interest group on narrative from 1999 before joining the IKM in 2001)[6] Kurtz and others continued this work in Cognitive Edge formed by Snowden when he left IBM in 2005. This period included work to extend the model to Leadership with Mary E Boone which culminated in the HBR article referenced below.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Quotable, "There's nothing so practical as a good theory, " and this one in particular helps with the complexity of change.  ~  D

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Prosci's Q & A on Bosom Buds: Change management and project management

Prosci's Q & A on Bosom Buds: Change management and project management | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it


Highlights:


Prosci has delivered a webinar on integrating change management and project management three times and asked attendees the following question:


_____________________________
   
“What are the most pressing topics or issues you are facing regarding change management and project management integration?”

_____________________________


Here are highlights of their analysis of the most common needs


Top 5 common pressing issues


1. Support and buy-in for change management from project teams


Participants felt that project leaders and project managers did not see the value or importance of change management. 


Tip: Make change management meaningful and real. 


2. Support for change management from leadership

...leaders and sponsors have a limited awareness of the need for change management, which impedes the critical integration of change management with project management activities. 

Tip: ...By making a direct connection between how well the people side of change is managed and the ultimate ROI of the project, you can shift the context and the conversation.


Others:


3. Scope, timing, and prioritization

4. Direction on how to integrate project management and change management. 

5. Role definition and clarity


Click the title to read the full article.


Change Management is an engagement focus.  Exert too much control, and you stifle it.  Here's more about control issues within a project implementation:

   

    



Via Blue Sky Change
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

"Prosci provides their perspective on how change management and project management cross paths in the execution of an initiative based on recent webinar Q & As."


These are helpful viewpoints on the state of the practice.  


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Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser

Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The classics of change management are here, featuring Lewin, as well as Agile project management and risks.

   

Excerpts:

  

Lewin’s change management model depicts three phases that apply to any change.

  

  1. Unfreeze, which means removing the constraints and generate the will to change. 
  2. The change itself, where people reposition themselves according to the new objectives. 
  3. Refreeze, where the new situation becomes stable.


Kotter’s 8-step change model is also listed. The article highlights:
Steps 1-to-5 fit into the “unfreeze” phase, steps 6 and 7 correspond to the “change” itself, and step 8 corresponds to the “refreeze” phase of Lewin’s model.


By Dr. John Kotter:

  1. Create urgency
  2. Form a coalition
  3. Create a vision for change
  4. Communicate the vision
  5. Remove obstacles
  6. Create short-term wins
  7. Build on the change
  8. Anchor the change


_______________________________


The change curve...shows that [a] main objective... is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.

_______________________________



Change management also deals with people’s stress and the temporary negative effect of change.  What helps with change stress?

   

  • Guarantee job stability for a period of time long enough for them to learn the new skills and settle in their new roles.
  • Increase tolerance to mistakes and decreased efficiency during a period of time.
  • Emphasize that this is a chance to develop new, more marketable skills.


The change curve (see Daryl Conner's work especially) pictures the negative impact of change across time.  It shows that one of the main objectives of change management is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.


_______________________________

   

Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects

_______________________________

    


Setting Up a Project to Manage Change

Many changes are carried in operational mode, which tends to be chaotic because it doesn’t explicitly address concerns such as cost management, quality management, schedule management, procurement, etc,

    

By balancing discipline and flexibility appropriately, Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects.

      

  • The most critical area is risk management.
  • In project management, risks are “known unknowns”, identified areas of uncertainty to manage. 
  • “Unknown unknowns”,  means risks not yet identified yet. 


    

The full article is here:  http://t.co/ADKBgl3v...)...

    

Companion, relevant articles by Deb are here:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Lewis is a bedrock source when looking for the origins of change management.  Adding agile project management adds perspectives on types of change as well.

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Evolutionary Or Revolutionary Change in Management? - Forbes

Evolutionary Or Revolutionary Change in Management? - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Do We Need Evolutionary Or Revolutionary Change in Management?


It is my pleasure to share a nugget or two from this provocative thought-piece on the role of management (read leadership decisions) in change.  Any post that talks about "real vs. sham" has a good chance of, as the writer says, separating the "chalk from the cheese."  ~  D


_________________________

   
In the new paradigm, the role of managers is to enable self-organizing teams that are tightly focused on delighting the customer.

_________________________


Excerpted:


...between two ways of organizing a society, dictatorship vs democracy, there is a very simple and very basic difference—who holds power?


One could spend a lot of time and energy putting the components of democracy in place with little to show for the effort, if the question of who holds power is not resolved at the outset.



[There's a} a simple basic difference between two very different models of how the world works.



On the one hand, we have the existing firm-centric paradigm in which the firm’s purpose is to make money for its shareholders and the firm revolves around the C-suite to achieve that goal.



On the other hand we have a customer-centric paradigm in which the firm’s purpose is to add value to the customer and the firm revolves around the customer.


....[what will be needed to form a] management paradigm that is externally focused, agile and totally focused on providing value to customers.


  • In the new paradigm, the role of managers is to enable self-organizing teams that are tightly focused on delighting the customer.
  
  • Work is coordinated through dynamic linking with short iterative cycles and feedback from customers at the end of each cycle.
   
  • Communications are interactive and horizontal.



Read the full post here - Evolution, Revolution


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Andrrey Yatsenko's curator insight, November 27, 2014 6:44 AM

Real  Transformation  with  New  Paradigm  for  Development  .

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Putting Customers as the Center of Your Business ~ Forrester

Putting Customers as the Center of Your Business ~  Forrester | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Does everyone in the organization have a clear picture of the processes customers go through when interacting with the organization?"


Forrester recently released a book ' Outside In : The Power of Putting Customers at the Center of Your Business'. The book highlights that customer experience is the greatest untapped source of cost savings ...



Understanding customer behavior and interactions can lead to the following benefits:



Identify New ‘Niche’ Customer Segments – Just because people share some similar characteristics  (e.g. female in the age group 35 – 45) does not imply that they share the same passions and interests. 



Deliver Targeted, Personalized Content and Advertising – Moving beyond ‘likes’ and ‘follows’ – to create a 360 degree of the customer ...for improving customer understanding and targeting them with personalized content.


Increase Customer Loyalty – Gaining deeper insights into existing customer segments as well as discovering new customer segments by developing a multi-channel strategy and aggregating data across mobile, social and digital channels.



Via Tom Debruyckere
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Robin Martin's comment, November 4, 2012 11:09 AM
Thanks Deb!! ; )
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 4, 2012 4:49 PM
You are most welcome Robin!
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3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class: Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian?

3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class:  Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"China’s Lenovo is now the second-largest PC maker in the world and hopes to grab the top spot from Hewlett-Packard soon."


Read on for goood competitive change  insights here on how 2nd and 3rd tier companies in China and India are now vying for global branding recognition, and why they've got a good shot at making it happen.  


Excerpts:


____________________________________

Non-branded companies earn margins of 3-8% and are at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. Branded firms enjoy fatter margins of 15% or more.

____________________________________


Chinese and Indian companies are no longer content to do the grunt work for Western firms, for two simple reasons:

  

  • non-branded companies typically earn gross margins of 3-8% and are constantly at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. 
   
  • Branded firms enjoy fatter margins (15% or more) and more loyal customers.


Yet becoming a global brand is exceedingly hard. ...GfK, a consumer-research company, found that only one-third of Americans were willing even to consider buying an Indian or Chinese car.


...How can others make the leap? “The New Emerging-Market Multinationals”, a book by Amitava Chattopadhyay, of INSEAD, and Rajeev Batra, of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, offers some clues.



____________________________________

   

...global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz.

____________________________________


The article illustrates three basics:

  

  • First, they must exploit their two basic advantages—economies of scale and local knowledge—to expand into new markets,
    
  • Some firms use their understanding of local markets to expand globally,
  
  • Others move swiftly to exploit opportunities.

   

The research in the book offers three more ingredients to these basics:

   

1.  The first is focus: they should define a market segment in which they have a chance of becoming world-class.

   
  • Natura Cosméticos, a Brazilian cosmetics-maker, zeroed in on the market for “natural” cosmetics with ingredients extracted from the rainforest.
    
  • Lenovo focused on computers for corporate clients before expanding into the consumer market. 
   

2.  The second is innovation: global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz. 

  • HTC produces 15-20 new mobile-phone handsets a year.
   
  • Natura releases a new product every three working days. 
   
3.  The third ingredient is old-fashioned brand-building: Questions to decide:  
   
  
  • Use the company’s name (as Toyota does) or another name (as Procter & Gamble does - Gillette razors to Pampers diapers)?
     
  • How to market effectively in multiple countries without budget-busting? Lenovo has hired an expensive American marketing firm, but saves money by doing most of its advertising work in Bangalore.


  

Read the full article here.


NOTE: Do you need perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing?


You can contact Deb Nystrom here to find out more, without obligation.

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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."


Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb


Excerpts:


Elaine Rumboll suggests:


  1. Adaptability
  2. Back Up
  3. Curiosity
  4. Diversity
  5. Ease of Access
  6. Foresight
  7. Grace in Failure
  8. Hubs
  9. Inclusiveness


The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:


  • be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected
  • create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction
  • build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react
  • [let go of] things remaining stable


Read the full article here.


Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous

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Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

  • take a break from their normal day jobs
  • creatively solve problems and drive change
  • Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents
  • agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition
  • knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs
  • collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth
  • evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization
  • serves for a period of one year
   

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.

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Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world

Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Today's global business environment requires bold new programs to drive high performance along three dimensions: change management, leadership, and culture.

  

This may why Peter Drucker say that there is no such thing as leadership.  

  

Culture trumps leadership and change, which is why multi-polar world  (as well as VUCA world, Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambigious in another post) caught my eye.

  

Excerpts:

  

Managers face major operational challenges in a global environment....

  

Communications and business processes must take place through virtual structures—teleconferences, e-mails, videoconferencing, electronic workflows...

____________________________

  

Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally.

____________________________

   

...new ways of working must be explicitly detailed and incorporated into management processes and structures, and in the ways work is moved around, checked and handed off (see "A bold new look for global sourcing,” Outlook, September 2007).

  

From a legal perspective, a crazy quilt of regulatory guidelines must be attended to as well.

  

....Some countries, for example, have restrictions on where an individual’s supervisor must reside. That can be a deal breaker for a company looking to have a team in one country reporting to a manager in another.

  

...Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally. Companies that still rely only on local efforts or, on the other hand, try to force change only from the center, are being outperformed.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kate Crisp
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10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.


________________________________

    

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

    

________________________________


I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


"General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

[to holism],says that each variable in any system

interacts with the other variables

so thoroughly that cause and effect

cannot be separated.


A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

Relationship is everything."    

- Marilyn Ferguson,  

The Aquarian Conspiracy



A sample from her blog post:


She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:


  • Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.
  
  • DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.
   
   
  • Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.
   
  • Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.


She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!



Read the full post here.

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