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Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question? What's the Goal?

Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question?  What's the Goal? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The answers we get out of data will always depend on the questions we ask.


Useful.  It also reminded me of one of the tools we use in Whole Scale change thinking:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate, or DPPE.  Thanks to twitter follower  @resilientchange for this link this week.


_______________________________

"Throughout history ....science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

_______________________________



Excerpts:


Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.


One key role we play in the process is choosing which data to look at. That this choice is often made for us by what happens to be easiest to measure doesn't make it any less consequential, as Samuel Arbesman writes, 


  • "Throughout history, in one field after another, science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."


In his book,  political forecaster Nate Silver writes about a crucial element, how we go about revising our views as new data comes in.


Silver is a big believer in the Bayesian approach to probability, in which we all have our own subjective ideas about how things are going to pan out, but follow the same straightforward rules in revising those assessments as we get new information.


It's a process that uses data to refine our thinking. But it doesn't work without some thinking first.


Read the full article here.


Perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining via Reveln.


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Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Change leader competencies that also include mindsets. All can be developed."


This is a handy list worth reviewing from colleague Gail Severini. There's more to come, including a top-ten competencies for change agents those who are the focus of the change.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


Change Leaders' Competencies include:


1.  Determination and discipline - The leader …“Has a profound resolve toward the specific shifts the organization has identified as essential for its future success,...” And, has the personal discipline to ...ake difficult and challenging actions.


2.  Self-Knowledge and mindfulness - ...calm in the midst of high-stress, dynamic change. The ability to concentrate and be attentive to other people and concepts...are intricately connected.


6.  Integrative thinking - Once we accept that transformational change presents enormous ambiguity it becomes obvious that the ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”.


7.  Culture awareness - An understanding of the organization’s current and desired cultures [and] plans for making the shift.


10.  Make meaning - Making the change relevant to every resource who has to make the transition --the  unusual capability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, to ...help them ...navigate their way through it. 


Read the full post here.

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Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples

Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The HBR post cites several case studies illustrating why many transformations fizzle, then two examples for how to turn it around."


The cautionary tales, names removed, are listed first.  Then the positive stories follow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


______________________

   

But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

______________________


A health insurer demonstrates a repeated pattern of 3- to 5-year cycles where it launches a change program, takes awhile for managers to get behind it, and then more time to get it funded. A program gets funded for a year but then everyone loses interest, and it gets defunded and dies.


Recently they're failing faster; the three- to five-year cycle is moving to two to three years. But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.


Just about everyone in the company agrees the culture is dysfunctional:

   

  • Some point to politics - competition between the COO and CFO blocking each other's progress. 
  • The CEO also had a way of questioning and stress-testing people that discouraged risk-taking => a "play it safe" mentality.
  • Executives who want quick wins scope projects to be done in a year. Most change programs there needed multiple years, so by the time a program extends beyond year one, executives move onto a new initiative.


What countermeasures are there to break a tragic change cycle like this?


______________________

   

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.

______________________


Successful efforts at health insurance companies Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan offer insights:


Organizational realignment — The structure of an organization determines the incentives that drive identity, behavior, and employee understanding of roles and responsibilities and priorities, as well as a sense of ownership and accountability.


Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's tried a more traditional functional management structure but then found it lost customer focus.

  

  • It appointed leaders to run market segments with profit and loss responsibility with the focus of changing the product mix and improve profitability. 
  • By organizing by customer, cross-functional changes became much easier to implement, and there was a dramatic turnaround in business results.
   

Improvement methods — a platform for doing work nimbly and at low cost included:

  

  • Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture as employees are empowered  so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts. 
  • Tactics such as daily huddles drove immediate wins and helped entrench a culture of empowerment.


Employee engagement — Employees fundamentally want themselves and the company to be successful, so successful change agents listen to their needs and help them transition.


Aetna describes how new CEO John Rowe and the senior team "sought out employees at all levels — those who were well connected, sensitive to the company culture, and widely respected — to get their input on the strategy, design and execution of intended process changes."


Executives at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan went into the field to gather input and communicate their commitment to change. Employees were trained in improvement methods ("Lean"), with every employee going through two sessions in accountability training.


Curator: Enrich your perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing.


Contact Deb Nystrom here for an initial consultation, without obligation.

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Harry Cannon's comment, November 1, 2012 11:30 AM
See article in HBR Jul-Aug 2012 by Katzenback et al.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 3, 2012 8:10 PM
Thanks Harry. I appreciate the link.
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Stakeholder Mapping » Change Factory

Stakeholder Mapping » Change Factory | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Another handy concept and tool, Stakeholder mapping.


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The Essence of Theory U and Presencing - Video Clip, the Blind Spot

"The Essence of Theory U and Presencing" - a clip of Otto Scharmer from Global Classroom Lecture 1: The Blind Spot.


I'm a fan of Theory U principles and concepts including Go Slow to Go Fast and dealing with the Blind Spot.  If you are unfamiliar with Theory U, here's a taste of a complex but not necessarily complicated body of work in change.


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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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Daryl Conner Change Approach Excerpted Interview with Deb

Realization over Installation.   Find out the difference in less than 5 minutes.

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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

______________________________

   

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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Living in An Interconnected Society - The Good, the Bad & the Potential, Tiffany Shlain

Tiffany Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards, through video illustrates today's interconnected society at The Economist's 2012 event in San Francisco.

  

_____________________________

   

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time.

_____________________________



What does it mean to live in a connected world? How is it changing us, our culture and the planet?

 

Her film "Connected"  illustrates:

  

Technology is changing the way we connect with people around us.   ...We have accumulated so much knowledge, yet we have trouble seeing the bigger picture. Perhaps it is time to declare our interdependence.

 

_____________________________

   

It's the beginning of a participatory revolution.

_____________________________


Close to 2 billion people on-line with 5 billion cell phones. It's the beginning of a participatory revolution. Ideas are free to interact, cross pollinate, creating hybrid perspectives all over the world.

 

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time. ...Once we understand the supply chains and see their results, we'll be more thoughtful about our behavior.

 

Tiffany Shlain favorite quote:  "Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even further."

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change and Ongoing Discussions"


Video here: [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRTnUKpDGWs]


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Ken Morrison's comment, August 17, 2012 9:38 AM
Thanks for sharing this. I took an online course from Howard Rheingold, who is in this film a few times.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, August 20, 2012 12:00 PM
Thank you for the rescoops. I really like this quote:
"Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even farther"

Best of luck on your scoop.it site. I like what I see here.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, September 2, 2012 7:53 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. I really hope that this video project is successful for her organization.
Ken
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Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It's a science AND an art; people are involved.  Treat change management as being of equal importance as the technical aspects of implementation.

   

Yes, I've seen many of these mistakes over the years.  Most recently: Modeling someone else's culture as a change blueprint, being penny-wise and pound-foolish about budgeting for change, staying inside the bubble of your own viewpoint (item#1 below.)  See if you agree with this list.

   

_____________________________

   

5% or 15%?  Underfunding!  "Gartner recommends ...allocat[ing] an average of 15% ...to ...change management, inclusive of training ...more, if ...the corporate culture is more change-averse." 

_____________________________

   

Excerpted:

  

...the most common mistakes:

   

1) Not Seeking Outside Expertise
Rarely do companies have deep change management expertise, though some [seek] to build this capability inhouse. Typically companies expect [their own people] to foster stability, eliminate process deviation, and minimize risk ...—and are rewarded for doing so. Expecting these same people to introduce change and “rock the boat” is ...counter to the normal, expected behaviors.

   

2) Short-Cutting the Change Process
... leaders disband the change management effort prematurely, cease to communicate, and stop engaging stakeholders too soon.  ...The greater the ...change ...the longer the ...change “sustainability” phase that is required.   


3) Executive Delegating Change Leadership Responsibility
....executive sponsors ...not seen or heard from again; sponsors ...uninformed of their initiative’s progress and unsure how to help; and sponsors not clear about what priority an initiative had among multiple business objectives.


4) Under-Funding the Change Management Effort
A 2011 Gartner survey found that companies under-invest in organizational change management. Companies allocate, on average, only 5% of the overall system implementation budget to the change management effort. Gartner recommends that companies allocate an average of 15% of the program budget to organizational change management, inclusive of training — but more, if changes are significant or the corporate culture is more change-averse.


5) Not Integrating Change Management with Program Management
...this can be a separate plan, with the critical milestones listed on the master program or project plan. ...program success is greatly diminished when the change management activities are “bolted on” ....

   

Read the full article here.    http://www.leadersbeacon.com/most-common-change-management-mistakes-companies-make/


For more Deep Change expertise, see our panel here:  http://www.scoop.it/t/change-leadership-vision/p/1549448247/the-trusted-advisors-with-open-space-event-was-a-hit-in-las-vegas    (I'm in orange, facilitating the Open Space portion.)



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Sales is also about Change Management & Change Leading

Sales is also about Change Management & Change Leading | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The buyer who was 100 percent satisfied last month may have a whole new perspective this month. Here's what to do to stay on top of these changes & keep customers satisfied."

I'm always looking for new perspectives on managing & helping leaders, at all levels, with change. Sales is about staying flexible in realizing your client / customer needs may not stay the same. Some will, some won't. ~ Deb

______________________________


...you’re well positioned to learn about any changes long before your competitors get wind of them – if you make a point of asking.

______________________________


Excerpts:

Change could leave you vulnerable. The buyer who was 100 percent satisfied last month might have a whole new perspective this month – not because of anything you did, but because something about his or her situation changed.

Fortunately, you’re well positioned to learn about any changes long before your competitors get wind of them – if you make a point of asking.


How long has it been since you’ve asked these questions about your accounts?

  • How is your customer’s business different than it was a year ago? 
  • How will it be different a year from now? 
  • Do your products and services deliver at least as much value as before?
  • Is my customer’s business expanding? 
  • Are their needs changing as a result? 
  • Are your solutions scalable – and does the customer know it?
  • Is the customer’s business consolidating? 
  • Downsizing? Are you offering alternatives or leaving them for an outsider?
  • Is your primary contact’s job changing? 
  • Will he or she be more or less influential in the purchase decision? 
  • What would happen if he or she found a new job or got laid off? 


Read the full article here: http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/top-sales-dog/sales-as-change-management/

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Change on Social: How LinkedIn Has Turned Your Resume Into A Cash Machine: News, Discussion, Expansion

Change on Social:  How LinkedIn Has Turned Your Resume Into A Cash Machine: News, Discussion, Expansion | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Carving out the professional cocktail party, talent pool that is LinkedIn may be the smarter strategy:  a slice of something massive in all that is social.


You may have heard the analogies before e.g. LinkedIn is the cocktail party, Facebook is the backyard B-B-Q.  Here's how LinkedIn is making it work in social in the power of that professional party niche, circa 2012 with their current successes & future plans.  ~ Deb


Excerpted from Forbes, author, George Anders:


_______________________

  


"There could be data on every economic opportunity, every skill required to get those jobs and every company offering those roles."  ~ Jeff Weiner, CEO, LinkedIn

_______________________


Linked is has:


  • LinkedIn Today, a customized news site that lets people see a front page tailored for their careers.
   
  • Thousands of profession-specific discussion boards, which cater to everyone from auditors to zookeepers.



  • Opened sales offices in Germany, Japan, Brazil, India, Spain and Hong Kong.
   
  • Plans to create an “economic graph” that would show all the matches—and mismatches—between needed skills and available talent worldwide.


“...There could be data on every economic opportunity, every skill required to get those jobs and every company offering those roles. There could be a professional profile for every member of the 3.3 billion people in the global workforce." ~ Jeff Weiner, CEO, LinkedIn


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3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class: Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian?

3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class:  Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"China’s Lenovo is now the second-largest PC maker in the world and hopes to grab the top spot from Hewlett-Packard soon."


Read on for goood competitive change  insights here on how 2nd and 3rd tier companies in China and India are now vying for global branding recognition, and why they've got a good shot at making it happen.  


Excerpts:


____________________________________

Non-branded companies earn margins of 3-8% and are at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. Branded firms enjoy fatter margins of 15% or more.

____________________________________


Chinese and Indian companies are no longer content to do the grunt work for Western firms, for two simple reasons:

  

  • non-branded companies typically earn gross margins of 3-8% and are constantly at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. 
   
  • Branded firms enjoy fatter margins (15% or more) and more loyal customers.


Yet becoming a global brand is exceedingly hard. ...GfK, a consumer-research company, found that only one-third of Americans were willing even to consider buying an Indian or Chinese car.


...How can others make the leap? “The New Emerging-Market Multinationals”, a book by Amitava Chattopadhyay, of INSEAD, and Rajeev Batra, of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, offers some clues.



____________________________________

   

...global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz.

____________________________________


The article illustrates three basics:

  

  • First, they must exploit their two basic advantages—economies of scale and local knowledge—to expand into new markets,
    
  • Some firms use their understanding of local markets to expand globally,
  
  • Others move swiftly to exploit opportunities.

   

The research in the book offers three more ingredients to these basics:

   

1.  The first is focus: they should define a market segment in which they have a chance of becoming world-class.

   
  • Natura Cosméticos, a Brazilian cosmetics-maker, zeroed in on the market for “natural” cosmetics with ingredients extracted from the rainforest.
    
  • Lenovo focused on computers for corporate clients before expanding into the consumer market. 
   

2.  The second is innovation: global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz. 

  • HTC produces 15-20 new mobile-phone handsets a year.
   
  • Natura releases a new product every three working days. 
   
3.  The third ingredient is old-fashioned brand-building: Questions to decide:  
   
  
  • Use the company’s name (as Toyota does) or another name (as Procter & Gamble does - Gillette razors to Pampers diapers)?
     
  • How to market effectively in multiple countries without budget-busting? Lenovo has hired an expensive American marketing firm, but saves money by doing most of its advertising work in Bangalore.


  

Read the full article here.


NOTE: Do you need perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing?


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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."


Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb


Excerpts:


Elaine Rumboll suggests:


  1. Adaptability
  2. Back Up
  3. Curiosity
  4. Diversity
  5. Ease of Access
  6. Foresight
  7. Grace in Failure
  8. Hubs
  9. Inclusiveness


The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:


  • be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected
  • create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction
  • build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react
  • [let go of] things remaining stable


Read the full article here.


Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous

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Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

  • take a break from their normal day jobs
  • creatively solve problems and drive change
  • Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents
  • agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition
  • knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs
  • collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth
  • evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization
  • serves for a period of one year
   

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.

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Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world

Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Today's global business environment requires bold new programs to drive high performance along three dimensions: change management, leadership, and culture.

  

This may why Peter Drucker say that there is no such thing as leadership.  

  

Culture trumps leadership and change, which is why multi-polar world  (as well as VUCA world, Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambigious in another post) caught my eye.

  

Excerpts:

  

Managers face major operational challenges in a global environment....

  

Communications and business processes must take place through virtual structures—teleconferences, e-mails, videoconferencing, electronic workflows...

____________________________

  

Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally.

____________________________

   

...new ways of working must be explicitly detailed and incorporated into management processes and structures, and in the ways work is moved around, checked and handed off (see "A bold new look for global sourcing,” Outlook, September 2007).

  

From a legal perspective, a crazy quilt of regulatory guidelines must be attended to as well.

  

....Some countries, for example, have restrictions on where an individual’s supervisor must reside. That can be a deal breaker for a company looking to have a team in one country reporting to a manager in another.

  

...Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally. Companies that still rely only on local efforts or, on the other hand, try to force change only from the center, are being outperformed.


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10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.


________________________________

    

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

    

________________________________


I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


"General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

[to holism],says that each variable in any system

interacts with the other variables

so thoroughly that cause and effect

cannot be separated.


A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

Relationship is everything."    

- Marilyn Ferguson,  

The Aquarian Conspiracy



A sample from her blog post:


She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:


  • Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.
  
  • DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.
   
   
  • Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.
   
  • Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.


She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!



Read the full post here.

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Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed: MSN Money & HBR

Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed:  MSN Money & HBR | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Let employees tell their stories. ~ The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer."


This reminds me "slow is fast," from Theory U, popularized by Otto Scharmer.  This thinking is not new to change strategy, but it can be difficult to those used to cascade implementations. 

The power of story is very real when combined with honest questions, that is, if you ask the question, you are truely open to hearing and responding fully to the answers. ~ Deb


_______________________


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows.   

_______________________


Excerpts:   


"Conventional approaches to change management urge leaders to set a vision and cascade it down the organization.


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows. The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer.


Instead of dictating how the organization will evolve, take a high-involvement approach. Describe the problem you are trying to solve and then ask others how they would address it.


During these discussions, roughly lay out your vision, but ask employees how they picture the change taking place. This takes time and effort of course. But the payoff is huge."


Source:   Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\www.hbr.org).


Photo credit:  by Jill Clardy

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First Follower: Change Leadership Lessons from Dancing Guy

"A new, viral classic video in that the first follower is really the dance of change leadership." 


This useful, brief video classic has been around awhile.  Yet I'm still discovering leaders and change staffers who don't know about it. Clear, compelling change teaching in under 3 minutes. ~  Deb

__________________________


The first follower transforms a lone nut into a leader.
__________________________


Excerpts:  


If you've learned a lot about leadership and making a movement, then let's watch a movement happen,  ...


Now comes the first follower with a crucial role: he publicly shows everyone how to follow. Notice the leader embraces him as an equal, so it's not about the leader anymore - it's about them, plural. Notice he's calling to his friends to join in. It takes guts to be a first follower!


The first follower transforms a lone nut into a leader. If the leader is the flint, the first follower is the spark that makes the fire.


Now here come 2 more, then 3 more. Now we've got momentum. This is the tipping point! Now we've got a movement!


__________________________

   

As more people jump in, it's no longer risky.

__________________________


If they were on the fence before, there's no reason not to join now. They won't be ridiculed, they won't stand out, and they will be part of the in-crowd, if they hurry.


Over the next minute you'll see the rest who prefer to be part of the crowd, because eventually they'd be ridiculed for not joining.


And ladies and gentlemen that is how a movement is made!


See the official, full transcript at http://sivers.org/ff 

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Horror stories, language and lessons: Building Change Capability

Horror stories, language and lessons: Building Change Capability | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

No Trust = Minimal and ineffective change - with a true horror story ERP failed implementation to bring it home.


See Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve for the full model.

   
In this change practitioner group's MeetUp a key question emerged:  How do you build, manage and reward trust through successful engagements and implementations of change?

   

Take the horror story shared:

   

  • a large-scale ERP implementation that with 8 hours to go until commencement of training, cancelled the training courses and disrupted delegates who were flying from across the country to attend.” The client never regained trust in the solution being delivered or the solution provider managing the change.

   

  • Lack of trust can lead to a horror story, or like with the story above, a horror story can lead to a lack of trust. 

   

_______________________
   
Lack of trust can lead to a horror story...or a horror story can lead to a lack of trust.

_______________________


Other excerpts: 

  

  • Our job is made harder by the fact that sometimes it’s best not to call change “change” and it can be difficult knowing when and who that rule applies to.

  

On language and labels, including internal change champions:

      

  • Often even they don’t want to be associated with the change by title. It’s as if labelling someone a “Change Capability Manager” or “Change Champion” gives the rest of the organisation the right to lump that person who has “change” in their title with all the stuff they’d rather not manage themselves.

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How Do You Change An Organizational Culture? A model view of leadership influence.

How Do You Change An Organizational Culture?  A model view of leadership influence. | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Via Forbes, one of the more fruitful success strategies make full use of leadership tools, including a vision or story of the future and lessen use of  power tools of coercion and fear.


The constructs of interlocking systems of tools in three groups is a useful thinking piece, perhaps as a diagnostic as well as a change planning model to review where planning may have weaknesses in adapting to change.


_________________________________

   
Single-fix changes such as teams, Lean, or Agile... may appear to make progress, but eventually the interlocking elements of organizational culture take over.

_________________________________


  

Excerpts:

Changing an organization’s culture is one of the most difficult leadership challenges. That’s because an organization’s culture comprises an interlocking set of goals, roles, processes, values, communications practices, attitudes and assumptions.

The elements fit together as a mutually reinforcing system and combine to prevent any attempt to change it. Single-fix changes such as teams, Lean, or Agile / Scrum, or knowledge management or some new process may appear to make progress, but eventually the interlocking elements of organizational culture take over. The existing organizational culture returns.


…the most fruitful success strategy is to begin with leadership tools, including a vision or story of the future, cement the change in place with management tools, such as role definitions, measurement and control systems, and use the pure power tools of coercion and punishments as a last resort, when all else fails.


See the full article here.

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“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."


Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb


Excerpts:  


There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

___________________________

   

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

___________________________


The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.


Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

  • “Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”
   
  • “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  


She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.


  • “Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.


Photo credit:  JD Hancock

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IT, Agile & Change Management: Four Cs for Success

IT, Agile & Change Management: Four Cs for Success | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"IT offers a seasoned perspective on both agility & change due to the volatile, fast moving nature of their field, including this CIO view on successful change Cs."
 

The author offers that IT is the lynchpin for crucial business change.  IT has also been labeled the accelerator of successful change.  


Consider the role of IT in facilitating growth in emerging markets (social media, analysis), adapting more agile business models [from IT we have agile as a business structure for projects), or helping with our increased dependence on collaborative, globally dispersed teams (Skype, WebEx, Google+ hangout meetings, anyone?)  ~ Deb

  

____________________________

   

People won’t commit to “a good idea.”  ...People who have a “why” will accomplish almost any “how.”

____________________________


Excerpted:  Four Secrets to Success - Commitment, Community, Clarity & Communication

   

1. Commitment. ...the single most important reason why CIOs cannot sustain change.

   

  • being bound emotionally and intellectually to a course of action 
  • [NOT] mere “compliance” -- people going along with a mandatory recommendation or new process without really believing in it
  • people ...believe in what they’re doing and are intent on completing the journey.
  • people have to make that jump themselves, even while their natural instincts scream at them to resist. 
  • invite discussion and dissent, air these misgivings and steer the negative emotions into positive ones.
   

2. Community   ...requires different people collaborating in diverse roles to purposefully drive change forward, leaving nothing to chance.   Key roles include: a change leader, change agents & advocates.

  

3. Clarity. People won’t commit to “a good idea” -- they need to understand why the change is necessary and why the current state is no longer viable. People who have a “why” will accomplish almost any “how.”   (For a good change model on this, see the DVF>R here.)

  

____________________________

   

...invite discussion and dissent, air these misgivings and steer the negative emotions into positive ones.

____________________________



4. Communication...the glue that holds the entire change initiative together. [This is more than] sending an e-mail, holding a town hall meeting or conducting a presentation. [Some also include] two-way methods, such as small-group meetings and facilitated Q&As.

   

Inspiring change requires more ...creating opportunities for groups to voice their concerns, bringing obstacles to light...and training, coaching and providing feedback, as well as opportunities for practice and learning.


...some IT teams now anticipate stakeholder needs rather than just respond to them; help reshape business strategy rather than just support it; and consult on business process improvements rather than just provide system upgrades.


The full article is here.  Author, Dan Roberts is the CEO and President of Ouellette & Associates and contributing author of the book "Unleashing the Power of IT," which profiles the successful change initiatives of three CIOs and their staffs.  


For more about Deb & her work with change, visit Deb's homepage REVELN here.


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Change Community: Writing an Online Community Plan - How To

Change Community:  Writing an Online Community Plan - How To | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

If you plan on building an online community you must have a plan - not a strategy, but a community plan. The list below will help you develop your plan and improve the growth and experience of your community. 

   

The plan is relevant for  social communities, blogging, email marketing and just about anywhere else online.

    

Recommendation: Create an online community plan and then segment each category with their own responsibilities


DN:  I suggest a thorough answer to this question before the steps below:  What is the purpose of being in the community?  (Short & long term.)

  

Elements:

  

1.  Who runs the community.   A leader. Choose one person (responsibility, control, standards, expectations) to manage the online community.  

  

2.  Build community persona.  Who you are targeting to join?  Include demographics, habits and attitudes, vehicle types they drive, education levels, average annual income, marital status, number of kids, etc. 

  

3. Early focus.   Focus on 20-50 people that fall into your persona descriptions, to encourage early joining.

  

4.  Why should they join?  Be prepared to explain why these people should join:

  • Value proposition?  
  • Increase their stature in the off-line community?  
  • Increased visibility or fame?  

  

5. Retaining new members.  What is your plan to get them engaged and to retain them?  Defined your process to get new members engaged immediately or they will lose interest.  Assign a dedicated member to mentor each new member that joins the community for about 3 weeks.  Provide the opportunity to engage, ask questions, recommendations.

  

6.  Community happenings.  Short-term and long-term - activities

  

7.  How will you grow the community?  Exclusive?  Grow a massive community?  Define your clear vision of how to or not to promote the community for growth.

  

8.  Platform selection.  Explain your choice via the  type of community you are building - note  forums, mailing lists, newsgroups, etc.

  

9. Content creation.  Create a content calendar, plan for content creation at least 4-6 weeks out when you launch.  Stay at least 30 days ahead of publishing. Assign responsibilities for management, creation, editing, and publishing of the content for the community.

  

10.  Value.   [DN:  See purpose & vision, to ensure this is delivered!]

  

Sourcehttp://bit.ly/M8xgMu

  

Resources

   

Plan for Content Creation --  http://bit.ly/Pil9Sa

The Social Media TuneUp -- http://bit.ly/KXr88R


Via maxOz
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