Change Management...
Follow
Find
13.9K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
onto Change Management Resources
Scoop.it!

Systems in Action: Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco

Systems in Action:  Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Change is constant. And technology has always been about change and convergence. "This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit."


Massive, global-scale change occurring now is happening at rates faster than anyone ever predicted.

How Big is “Everything”?

The Internet of Everything will create $14.4 trillion in value at stake through the combination of increased revenues and lower costs in just the next ten years – creating an opportunity to increase global corporate profits by an estimated 21% over the next decade.


The five main factors fueling this value are:


  • Asset utilization: $2.5 trillion in reduced costs
  • Employee productivity: $2.5 trillion in greater labor efficiencies
  • Supply chain and logistics: $2.7 trillion through eliminating waste
  • Customer intimacy: $3.7 trillion through addition of more customers
  • Innovation: $3.0 trillion through reducing time to market
    

Collaboration ties in throughout these factors. This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit: Small businesses, enterprises, service providers, system integrators, device makers are all critical to building out the connections and scaling experiences across every industry.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is the promising side of big data and collaboration.  What do you see in your categories of cost & benefit and abundance in this thinking?  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In

Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Your intuition is never enough.

    

Why do organizations so often introduce ...new initiatives without thinking about this step? 

     

...Confirmation bias and the escalation of commitment lead organizations to refrain from evaluating changes because the key decision makers feel (erroneously) that they already know that the changes are good ones. The unfortunate result is that organizations persist in implementing ineffective policies and fail to even contemplate the possibility of superior alternatives.

     

That’s where experimental testing comes in. By forcing organizations to clearly articulate their goals and then to rigorously judge their decisions by those metrics, experimental tests can help managers avoid costly mistakes and can open up the consideration of other possible solutions.

     

....A handful of organizations have already embraced the principles of behavioral economics and the experimental mindset. One is the Walt Disney Company’s R&D department, where one of us spent a summer. After identifying areas for cost reduction or process streamlining, it would design randomized experiments to test the effectiveness of possible changes.

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

       

     

       

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best ScoopIt news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Have you tried testing, piloting, and these forms of experimenting before planning or preparing for large scale, whole system change implementation within your culture?   The article lists several examples of those who have, including Disney and a tech support center.   

Germany, who has gone back to a tuition free model for higher education, tested, voluntarily, tuition models by region.  Volunteers are a great way to build early commitment and home-grown stories to support change.  ~  Deb 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

   


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 8:31 AM

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 12:54 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What Work in the Mideast Taught Me About Building Business Relationships

What Work in the Mideast Taught Me About Building Business Relationships | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The old stuffed shirt business meeting that just goes on and on and on is the reason no one wants to attend. The new generation of worker is going to force all these mainstays of business to be “rethought.”

I much prefer a more relaxed business environment where everyone is at ease, and, where the mission of the meeting is not lost. Let’s all relax and really talk to each other and get to know each other.  If we successfully handle this right, we will be” partners” in the end.

That is why we build the foundation first. When we do, the business will take care of itself.


There is an old saying that you build the well before you need the water. That especially hold true for business today.

s always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Recent and related posts by Deb:

    

         
      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a good piece on taking a global look at the ordering of what matters in business relationships, the people first, and then the results.  So much of this is based on holding on to the industrial age thinking of having it the other way around.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Telling Your Client the Baby Is Ugly, Truth-Telling for Change

Telling Your Client the Baby Is Ugly, Truth-Telling for Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This discernment process, of getting on the "right" road, involves sharing wisdom. This Shared Wisdom method is based upon several underlying beliefs including one that says that the people in the organization already possess the wisdom to discern the "right" path. Trouble is, no one individual has all of the wisdom (though some may think that they do). 

What is needed is respectful facilitation that seeks out everyone's "piece of the wisdom" and puts all the pieces on the table, even if there is conflict and disagreement. 

All the wisdom is needed, all the wisdom is honored.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Courage for truth-telling is key. I've been in organization development practitioner (OD) conferences with plenty of PhDs & yet have seen apathy or resignation to status quo actions. It is hard, very hard to move the needle at times, even when the risk is fairly low. ESPECIALLY during the lower risk times, it is important to find the "feisty" in your being to help the truth telling happen, tempered with the wisdom to time it well, so it is heard. Otherwise it is just pretty words, OD values "not in action.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

How Change Courageous Are You? The “Serving Two Masters” Trap

How Change Courageous Are You?  The “Serving Two Masters” Trap | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

...an overlooked statistic tells quite a story.  If only 14% believe that “everyone” is responsible for change success, how can the whole system change? Answer … it doesn’t.


...Change Agent Moment of Truth

In theory, internal consultants are neutral. In reality, many HR executives feel threatened by internal OD consultants to the point that I’ve witnessed OD consultants fired for their successes.

     

The dilemma is all about the question, “who do you serve?”

Stop the insanity of blaming the change recipients & start holding up the mirror for you, whether you are a change agent or change leader.

   

If you level the playing field, give a voice to the silent majority, and really confront change leaders and fellow change agents with their contributions to the status quo, you just might be part of the 20% instead of the 80%.

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

    

    

    

       
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Regardless of the mixed statistics about how many change initiatives fail, Ron Koller's key point about only 14% believing change is everyone's role is quite telling.   
   
Do you agree with the change roles and the in/out "everyone" is responsible for change comparisons?  

   

Moreover, in my conversation with Ron Koller recently about courage and the OD / Change Agent, have you found ways to be successful when you "level the playing field, give a voice to the silent majority, and really confront change leaders and fellow change agents with their contributions to the status quo?"

   
~ Deb

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

New Online Edition Coming: Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants

New Online Edition Coming:  Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

A new, 4th edition and NOW online guide, easily updated, is coming, helpful to organization development and change management practitioners everywhere.

Here's the print version, listed at Wiley.  2nd Edition - William J. Rothwell, Roland L. Sullivan



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm thrilled to have been invited to submit a chapter on organization development, change management and change leadership for review for late August.   A colleague who is finishing is PhD, Ron Koller, will also be submitting his new research for another chapter based on change resistance.

I am looking forward to working through what I've learned in my change experiences over the past 20 years at a major research university as well as as an independent in the last 5 years, working with businesses to share practice, actionable lessons learned.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Pi Wen Looi, PhD.
Scoop.it!

Establishing a New Normal, A Case Study via ASTD

Establishing a New Normal, A Case Study via ASTD | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Recently, the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) changed its name.  Reactions to the name change ranged from excitementcynical, to disappointment....One thing is clear. For a major change like this—an identity change, no less—the change process could have been handled better.

______________________
    
 The last thing you want to happen during a transition is for employees to start a rumor mill.
______________________


Lessons learned include:

2. Get employees involved early in the change process. People who lead the change have more information and time to process the information than the majority of the organization. ....You can provide a communication channel, such as an employee survey or focus groups, to test your change concept and for your employees to provide feedback.


3. Communicate frequently. It usually takes a village and a lot of time to transition from the current state to the future state.   ...Err on the side of over-communicating because people crave accurate and timely information during a transition. The last thing you want to happen during a transition is for employees to start a rumor mill.


4. Acknowledge the old, celebrate the past, and welcome the new.

It’s important to acknowledge how past successes have led the company to its current state. You can build on the foundation of past success, acknowledge employees’ contributions, and launch for the future.


5. Establish the new normal. ...what new behaviors [are needed now?]  Establish new norms, language, and align your existing operational processes to support the new direction....companies that are growing too fast without establishing the needed infrastructure and operational processes create a lot of chaos for employees - employee engagement scores decline.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

                          

                    

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

What is the New Normal?  It's just part of the steps & lessons learned from this retrospective case study of a name change in a large association.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals: Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur

Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals:  Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

In 1996 a disaster of historic proportion happened on the peak of Mount Everest. In the entire climbing season, 15 climbers died. Eight of those deaths took place on a single day."


____________________


In the corporate world we’re often focused on achieving our goals at all costs. This eventually reaches the status of dogma.

____________________
     


Journalist and mountain climber Jon Krakauer captured this story in his book “Into Thin Air;” he was on the mountain that day.
    
Krakauer puts part of the blame on the stubbornness of a climbing guide. While there is some evidence to support this claim, most climbers are, by definition, stubborn and arrogant. Yet disasters of this magnitude are rare. 
    
...
In this case the teams encountered a traffic jam at Hilary pass that slowed progression, and disregarded their turnaround time.   ...Members, however, continued on reaching the summit   ...Doug Hansen, a postal service worker from the New Zealand group, was the last to summit. While he made it to the top, the odds were against him ever coming back.

Like seven others, he died on the descent. 

     

...What would it look like to embrace uncertainty?

      

____________________
   
Start with your means.  Don't wait for the perfect opportunity.
   
____________________
      
    

Professor Saras Sarasvathy interviewed forty-five “successful” entrepreneurs and found a disconnect between our thoughts on entrepreneurs as successfully pursuing a goal-oriented approach and reality.

    

"An entrepreneur's ...precise endpoint was often mysterious to them, and their means of proceeding reflected this. Overwhelmingly, they scoffed at the goals-first doctrine of Locke and Latham. Almost none of them suggested creating a detailed business plan or doing comprehensive market research to hone the details of the product they were aiming to release."

  

The most valuable skill of a successful entrepreneur...[is] the ability to adopt an unconventional approach to learning: an improvisational flexibility  [including] a willingness to change the destination itself, [using] a set of principles she calls “effectuation.”

      

 “Start with your means. Don’t wait for the perfect opportunity. Start taking action, based on what you have readily available: what you are, what you know and who you know.”

     

A second is the “principle of affordable loss”  ...— ask how big the loss would be if you failed. So long as it would be tolerable, that’s all you need to know. Take that next step, and see what happens.

        

“The quest for certainty blocks the search for meaning,” argued the social psychologist Erich Fromm. “Uncertainty is the very condition to impel man to unfold his powers.” Uncertainty is where things happen. It is where the opportunities — for success, for happiness, for really living — are waiting.

Related tools & posts by Deb:


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    


      



    


     


    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  


_______________________
   
“A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at.”  

~ Bruce Lee
_______________________

    

    


This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  


~  Deb 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 25, 2:18 PM

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  
    
This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  


~  Deb 

Suggested by WGA Consulting
Scoop.it!

When Change is NOT the Right Thing for Business - Harvard Blog Perspective

When Change is NOT the Right Thing for Business - Harvard Blog Perspective | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Ask your customers what they want.
  • Is constant adaptation always the best policy?
  • Do your customers really want you to change?
  • Will change alienate your base?
  • Will you confuse people?
  • What is the cost?
  • Will the change make you vulnerable?


The bottom line:  "Your customers will dictate when and how much to change. Keep asking them what they want (we recommend a formal or informal audit every six months) and keep watching their behavior, since they aren’t always able to articulate their desires. Then change as they do, or just a little bit faster."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This change management perspective is worthy of review for any change leader or facilitator/consultant.  The 5 questions are savvy "change what" questions and highlight that change is driven by staying close to the heart and sensibilities of your customer, even if they cannot articulate what they want.  

Henry Ford said that if he'd listened to his customers, he would have built a faster horse.  However, in one sense, that is exactly what he did.  Then it was up to us to build better roads.

Systems thinking and change, once again.   ~  Deb 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 29, 5:16 PM

The 5 questions are savvy "change what" questions and highlight that change is driven by staying close to the heart and sensibilities of your customer, even if they cannot articulate what they want.  

Henry Ford said that if he'd listened to his customers, he would have built a faster horse.  However, in one sense, that is exactly what he did. Then it was up to us to build better roads.

Systems thinking and change, once again.   ~  Deb 

 

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Moving Beyond Hierarchy - What is Working Now to Lead Through Change?

Moving Beyond Hierarchy - What is Working Now to Lead Through Change? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Letting people manage themselves actually works."


[It] enables people to control their own destinies... [radical decentralization is] aligned with the urgings of our selfish genes. 

From a market perspective, it’s more efficient and effective. 

From a cultural perspective, virtually every organizational innovation since the Western Electric Hawthorne studies has been aimed at fostering democracy and initiative in the workplace because it’s good for both people and the business. 

Moving to an entrepreneurial organization is just the next step. –from -  Charles Jacobs: Management Rewired


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

                      

               

                    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche's collection of quotes and readings forecasts the evolution or creative destruction of industrial age hierarchies.
     

Take GM, for instance. It has an embedded, decades old cultural hierarchy that struggles to embrace team concepts, plant by plant. It is just now starting to happen. It affects how decisions are made and can result in problem decisions, cascading to bad press, such as the massive recall now happening.
    

Compare that to Zappos, using holacracy, and those using wirearchy as new forms of leadership.  Zappos started with a completely different baseline for how leadership will be distributed. Time will tell how growth will happen in both companies. ~ D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Change Management featured at the KM Solutions Showcase™ in Arlington, VA - March 27, 2014

Change Management featured at the KM Solutions Showcase™ in Arlington, VA - March 27, 2014 | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
From the KM Institute…
   
A reminder about the upcoming KM Solutions Showcase™ Conference & Expo, March 27, at the Westin Arlington
   
The Showcase is a fun, one-day conference covering the hottest topics in Knowledge Management: Change Management, Culture Change, KM Methods; Knowledge Capture & Retention, Taxonomy/Search, and more.
    
It's FREE for all Government and Military, and low-cost for Industry.  Located at the beautiful Westin Arlington, just two blocks from the Ballston Metro Stop.  
    
Includes gourmet boxed lunch, prizes, vendor exhibits, materials and Happy Hour.
   
The Agenda is set, our acclaimed Speakers are booked… and we hope you can join us!  
   
Register soon!  Also feel free to forward to friends/colleagues who may be interested.  Groups are welcome!

The change management track includes me:

Deb Nystrom
President of Reveln Consulting, Deb's expertise and service offering is three-fold: 1) Aligning Data, People, and Passion,
2) Solutions in Change Facilitation and Leadership, and

3) Social Media, to empower Change Leaders, consultants, and coaches, using her popular "Social Media Learning Lab" (SMLL).


Deb will discuss how to FRAME an approach to adaptive, people-centered change and knowledge management.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'll be presenting at this KM conference in the change management track.   My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  

Come join us for a good day of learning and exchange in Arlington, Virginia, near D.C.   My other speaking events are:

Recent speaking events are here. ~  Deb 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 17, 11:28 AM

There's still time to attend this one day Knowledge Management conference in lovely Arlington, Virginia.  I'll be presenting in the Change Management track.  My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 17, 1:24 PM

I'll be presenting at this KM conference in the change management track.   My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  

Come join us for a good day of learning and exchange in Arlington, Virginia, near D.C.   My other speaking events are:

Recent speaking events are here. ~  Deb 

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Talent and Performance Development
Scoop.it!

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:


See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools
     

      

      

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Holacracies, wirearchies and simply feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change.  It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations already committing to it, like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2:23 PM

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Culture & change management key to digital delivery at AGL

Culture & change management key to digital delivery at AGL | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Culture is one of the biggest hurdles AGL faces as it seeks to tackle digital disruption head-on and better respond to rising customer expectations."


Excepted:

AGL’s head of digital and customer experience, Josephine Monger, [spoke] at the Sitecore Digital Trendspot event in Sydney. She said the energy company’s 185-year heritage and conservative corporate culture had initially made it difficult to adopt the dynamic and interactive approach required in a digital-first environment.


_________________________

   

....a customer’s service expectations are not being set by the energy industry, but by digital giants such as Amazon. 

_________________________

“In the digital environment, you have to think quickly and make decisions faster. That test-and-learn, ‘fail fast’ approach can be scary for a lot of senior and middle management to take on-board. They want to do it, but have to take that leap of faith and become more agile in the way they work.”


Despite the challenges, AGL has made significant steps forward in building a digital strategy… [The] first major step was consolidating its collection of customer-facing websites into a single platform. …Another key to driving a digital-first mindset across the organisation was positioning change as an advantage, he continued.


“The trick is not to overthink things – if we do something and it’s right, then we carry on, but if it’s not, we’ll adjust or take that out.”…“Change is the benefit, rather than the enemy, and perceiving things that way has allowed us to become good at change,” says digital lead, Nigel Page,


The success of the digital team’s more agile approach opening up constructive debate around risk and management, Page said. “What we’re seeing now is an eagerness to start adopting these approaches more broadly through the organisation, so the benefit has been more than just in the pure digital space,” he said.


Monger pointed out a customer’s service expectations are not being set by the energy industry, but by digital giants such as Amazon. This makes it vital for organisations to start building better digital credentials.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here are some examples of an energy company making changes even though the culture was initially resistant.  As the late Kathie Dannemiller used to say, resistance is a resource.   The statement about digital giants setting customer experience expectations, such as Amazon.com, is provocative for making a culture change internally.  It seems to be working for them.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Classic: Different cultures challenge authority in different ways | Allon Shevat

Classic:  Different cultures challenge authority in different ways | Allon Shevat | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

..Do not assume that agreement with what you say is real; do not assume that those who challenge you are against you; and don’t ignore gossip but factor it in in societies where harmony is more valued than “truth”.

Explicit hardball challenging: Gilad (m, Israel) argues with his Israeli boss all the time. ...US based colleagues who have observed Gilad believe that Gilad shows no respect for his boss. However, once a directive is given, Gilad will carry it out to a T, never trying to stand by passively as things go bad.  Gilad and his boss play on the same soccer team and socialize together at the beach.

   

Pragmatic Controlled  Disagreement: Karen (f USA) believes that her American boss has made several critical errors over the last month. Karen i...asks some mildly  “challenging” questions after adding “well, let me play the devil’s advocate”. ...When one of her boss’s directives goes bad, Karen will be remain composed, and not go out of her way to help, allowing things “to take their course”.  Karen needs her boss’s recommendations after she leaves to “further her career”. Karen and her boss socialize only at the Christmas party.

     

.   


Posts by Deb:
     

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

         

Two Tried & True Change Models – Evergreen for Agile Change 

     

Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment

     

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

           

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Allon lists four examples in the full post.  It's a good test of your own degree of enthnocentricism to notice if you identify with the biases and blind spots he identifies so well in his posts.    His posts are very helpful for building your global citizenship and for the USA, minimizing the inept, ugly American syndrome abroad.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Letting Go: 6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

Letting Go:  6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"It takes courage, tenacity and teamwork to let go of performance appraisal practices and industrial age thinking.  In our  post 9-11, post financial meltdown, "New Normal,"  business will never be as it was.  Can we let go?"


A1998 article about ending appraisals in favor of the APOP, the Annual Piece of Paper is one way to go.   Using an approach like the APOP or a two box annual conversation method, Meets [or Exceeds], Does not Meet, as mentioned in the video, is a step in the right direction. It is a form of incremental change, very similar to the Adobe Systems “check-ins” featured here in more detail.  Adobe’s 2012 system moved away from individualized ranking and ratings.  


The full post includes a short video that features asking a "beautiful question:      


Why are we doing things the way we’ve been doing them the past 20 years—what if we tried a whole new approach?      Thank you Warren Berger, author of “A Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas (2014)


It also covers why using Pass / Fail evaluation systems can help.


See the video and full post here.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.  It  is embedded within change principles, which is why I've posted it here as well as in the Talent & Performance Development curation news.    The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  

A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 19, 1:05 PM

This is my own video and post about performance review systems or appraisals.

The video embodies the D X V X F > R, change model, originally invented by Gleicher and popularized by Kathie Dannemiller.   The video covers assessing readiness, Dissatisfaction, the need to explain why make a change, the Vision, and First Steps to overcome Resistance to Change - along with our our Industrial Age / command and control, Theory X (McGregor) mindsets.  


A new path is emerging, but it is a slow path in business.  ~  Deb 

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Change Management: The Tool of Disempowerment & How to Overcome It

Change Management: The Tool of Disempowerment & How to Overcome It | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Kotter’s 5th step, can also be called, The Empowerment Delusion
…This is where the “theory versus practice” problem really takes over…[it] breaks down in practice. One of two things generally happen during the implementation

The change plan is either …

1. too exclusive, a.k.a. “they never consulted us,” or
2. too inclusive, a.k.a. “they didn’t think this through.”

You are the “perplexed” …because you can’t make everyone happy. 
[If] The leader’s change plan is too macro in nature. It does not take into account the diverse local issues in different parts of the organization.


…The enhancement for stage 5 is …
Agree on Boundaries & Guidelines for Empowerment (horizontal and vertical) and connect it with: the enhancement for Stage 4 is … Communicate the change vision interactively - Two-Way Communication

DN:  From the link to the earlier post, here's a key, in Ron's earlier post:     The Golden Rule of Organizational Change:

If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus.   (YOU)


In the communication context, this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

               

     

      

  

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Colleague Ron Koller's post shows how to get beyond the pitfalls of the Kotter change model that can trap the inexperienced consultant working through change.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Face Your Tiger: Courage for Those Dreaded Conversations

Face Your Tiger:  Courage for Those Dreaded Conversations | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The great First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt once said, "You must do the thing you think you cannot do."In other words, you must face your tiger.That is the beginning of overcoming fear.

Excerpts:

Prepare yourself before entering the tiger's lair. As the saying goes "Success happens when preparation meets opportunity." So preparation is key for these conversations. Here are a few questions to consider in advance:

  • What is the issue you need to discuss with the other person(s)?
  • Why is it important to you?
  • What is the biggest obstacle in the way of having this conversation?
  • What is the cost of avoiding this conversation?
  • What would you gain by having this conversation?
  • What would it take for this conversation to go well?


So if you have been dreading and avoiding the conversations you should be having, now is the time to "do the thing you think you cannot do."

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a helpful companion post for my last Scoop minutes ago on courage.   In my own training in Crucial Confrontations, I learned that sometimes the conversation is not worth having as the issue may be about YOU, not them.  Other times, it is highly important to to "face your tiger," for your own self-worth, honoring your values and for self-efficacy - a fancy term for your belief in yourself getting the job done well.   

Judging the risk of falling on your sword is part of the job.  Hopefully THAT is not a scenario in your organization.  If it is, may your exit plan be a strong one.    ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Preach to Your Choir, Critical Mass in Change Depends on Follower Networks - John D. Adams

Preach to Your Choir, Critical Mass in Change Depends on Follower Networks  - John D. Adams | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Professor John D. Adams helps us understand some of the “soft” barriers to change and how to chart a path toward change by developing a critical mass of supporters for the desired change.

Change leadership is only half of the story. A movement for change requires followers, ...they rarely show up and commit to the change without considerable effort on our part.

Adams offers us some insight into three major barriers to effectively cultivating enough followers to get your change off the ground:

 

1) The auto-pilot mindset:   Adams reminds us that this is why, even when we agree that a change must be made, we often don’t follow through with a new way of doing things. 

 

___________________

  

…training is not the goal. The goal is the goal.

   

___________________


     


2) Bias toward training:   Of course, training is essential for change .  However, the training does not accomplish the change — it simply lays the groundwork.   …Confusing the training with the change is a common mistake.


The training is not the goal. The goal is the goal.

 

3) Absence of support for novelty management: Change automatically brings …uncertainty…anxiety…distress…surprise, unfamiliarity, uncertainty.  …Many leaders forget to support people through the emotional challenges that novelty can bring. 
 

People will need new information, a chance to learn new skills, time to develop attitudes and values that support the change, and rewards for adopting the change. Being deliberate and patient in these areas will help speed the change along.

     

___________________


PREACH TO YOUR CHOIR. ... “...creating a critical mass of people …who will ensure that the change process becomes self-sustaining.” 

___________________


    

Perhaps the most important message Adams offers is this: PREACH TO YOUR CHOIR....it is actually “the most important mechanism for creating a critical mass of people who are solidly behind a change program and who will ensure that the change process becomes self-sustaining.”


…the easiest path is to start with those who are willing to get on board immediately. Don’t take them for granted; stay focused on them to build momentum.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

          

    
    

           

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I was not familiar with John D. Adams' work, until yesterday.  His tools for understanding stress, transition (similar to William Bridges) and change is useful and may resonate with change practitioners who like to review models that may provide a useful reminder of the basics or clarify common mistakes in change leading.
   
Besides, if there is one thing that provokes curiosity to change and OD practitioners,  it is discovering a model and/or perspective that may shed light in the dark corners of the mysteries of leading change successfully.
   
As I was offering programs in stress in the early 80s, 9-10 years later than Adams.  He started offering health and stress workplace programs and coaching in 1975.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

While we often look to one hierarchical leader to guide us through difficult changes, in business and in public life, this may not be what is most effective.


__________________________
 
...shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change....
even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 

__________________________



In cases where a large scale strategic or transformative change needs to occur, leadership responsibilities need to shift and often become shared between various individuals or groups. 


Professor Duin and forum participants all shared personal cases where singular leadership was misaligned with the needs of the organization and shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change that would be by all the parties involved.   
This type of buy-in is often needed in the University setting, even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 


Whether restructuring colleges and departments to be a more competitive and well aligned university to developing ways for various technology centers to work together to delineate responsibilities, meet the needs of users, and continue evolving with the fast pace of new technology offerings, developing inroads for collaborative co-leadership is key to making broad innovative changes. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

      

    

     

        
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a reminder of the basics of change, from a higher education perspective.  It's interesting to see the siloed, bridged and shared scope definitions, appropriate to the hierarchies natural to higher education. 

In my own hometown, we have a new president about to begin, along the task of filling key, top-level vacancies in administration. Professor Ann Hill Duin, University of Minnesota has shared forum perspectives on change in academe, particularly what works, and what does not work.   ~  Deb

more...
Pascal Vedel's curator insight, July 19, 3:15 AM

Une bonne synthèse des divers types de changements...

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

4 Strategies To Deal With Ambiguity, Today's New Normal

4 Strategies To Deal With Ambiguity, Today's New Normal | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Excerpted:


Expect more ambiguity not just as you go up the career ladder, but as a growing workplace phenomenon. With more complexity, speed, change and competition, more decisions will have to be made with less data and certainty.


_____________________


Release yourself and your team from the prison of perfectionism. 

_____________________



Strategies to get you thinking:


1. Set expectations with your team and all stakeholders that it is an ambiguous situation you are working through. It will take time and experimentation.


2. Be clear about the problem you are trying to solve.


3. Release yourself and your team from the prison of perfectionism. 

_____________________


Run towards the lack of clarity and actively wrestle with it.

_____________________
 

[DN: The strategies below were embedded in tip #3 but deserve their own listing, because change consultants know, culture DOES trump strategy, every time.  Culture & strategy work in tandem.]

4.  Create a group culture around taking risks. Try a few small experiments. Learn, quickly course correct, and keep making progress.

Run towards the lack of clarity and actively wrestle with it. As you continue in your career, you are going to have to get good at it!

Marian Cook is currently the head of IT for a mid-market healthcare market leader of products, services and education. She leads a 100 person IT division with a major Oracle R12 implementation underway. She is currently on the Chicago's Mayor's Council of Technology.


WITI's Web site provides visitors with news, career opportunities, articles and info to empower women through technology.

Photo by by Lori Greig, Flickr


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

    

     

   
  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There are limited resources out there about to deal with ambiguity. This IT leader's points are useful in the change arena, including releasing one's own self from the "prison of perfection" - which I'd label the illusion of control.  Theory U has some good concepts for going further in dealing with ambiguity; my references are listed above.  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 11, 4:57 PM

There are limited resources out there about to deal with ambiguity. This IT leader's points are useful in the change arena, including releasing one's own self from the "prison of perfection" - which I'd label the illusion of control.  Theory U has some good concepts for going further in dealing with ambiguity; my references are listed above.  ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Lead Through Personality Complexity: Enough with Change Resistance Already!

Lead Through Personality Complexity:  Enough with Change Resistance Already! | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

People don't resist change, they resist being changed. Enough with regurgitating this awesome quote, start THINKING about what it means!


______________

...there’s no way to “ensure” everyone is progressing through the change at the same rate and same intensity.

______________


...Explore the symptoms of resistance:


[Try] using David Kersey’s Temperaments combined with the stages of Satir:

  • Satir Change Model Stages: Old Status Quo, Foreign Element, Chaos, Transforming Idea, Practice and Integration, New Status Quo.  This model explains how people respond to change physically, psychologically and logically.
David Kersey’s Temperaments (Carl Jung based):

  • SP (Artisans): Live for the chaos! Love the excitement... inventing problems that might not exist so they have “something to solve.
  • SJ (Guardians): Fight to preserve the status quo because it’s familiar...because they don’t want to dive into chaos until they know every possible detail of the change
  • NF (Harmonizers): Help people through the pain of chaos...Will want to not implement a change if it’ll upset the ‘herd.’
  • NT (Rationals): Fly through the change when it appeases their logic and moves on to the next change before anyone else has integrated the first change.


...Imagine...a team with people [with] competing preferences trying to make sense of an Agile transformation? How about if you have Artisans [the author of this piece - Jason Little] keeping the organization in a constant state of chaos?    ....Now I realize it isn’t “the other people”, it’s my approach.  


 ...I need to know when to push, and when to lay off...and I didn’t even touch the hundreds of cognitive biases that affect how people respond to change. 


...you cannot put a budget and schedule on change, there’s no way to “ensure” everyone is progressing through the change at the same rate and same intensity.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

     

             

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leading through complexity is an essential element of change management.  This post  is a good reminder of the layers of difference in change adoption - useful for Jungians - and the MBTI familiar  (Myers Briggs, Keirsey) as well as those using similar personality tools.  


It's also a good reminder for leaders, who know the nuances of any personality assessment.  It highlights that your perspective is quite limited.  Different perspectives of those on your leadership team, if they are diverse and helpful in their differences, and speak up, is of great value in true leadership teamwork.  ~  D

more...
Philippe Vallat's curator insight, May 19, 5:06 PM

Because complexity management has something to do with emergence, and emergence leads to change...

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 19, 3:34 PM
Some great shares here. Thanks for the comments and thanks everyone!
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Brain Based: 4 Factors That Distinguish Change Management Successes From Failures

Brain Based: 4 Factors That Distinguish Change Management Successes From Failures | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many MANAGEMENT GURUS, ACADEMICS and CEOs are writing on change, yet there is a difference between theory and actual change. ...When successful change occurs, employees feel like authors not objects of change. They feel fully invested, accountable and energetic about the future, regardless of challenges.


_____________________

   

Change only happens when we are engaged with others ...Only when our "brain-hardwiring changes" do we change.

_____________________



...many companies embarked on Re-engineering, Total Quality and Lean Manufacturing. However ...these approaches often failed. The energy ...was a top-down compliance approach...


Yet there were successes.   ...The key lies in understanding change from a brain-based perspective...change is a process "we" do together... 

 

Examples:


Scar 3: Change is head, heart and soul   Solution 3: Storytelling


Scar 4: Speed of change   Solution 4: Navigational Communications  ...navigating scenarios from many perspectives to arrive at practices and rituals that "we" all embrace


Photo:  by Daniele Oberti, Flickr CC


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Good, practical concepts here, including the one about, "We underestimate people's need for dialogue in order to feel comfortable regarding the new changes."  In an earlier comment, I mentioned that a change colleague said we under-communicate by a factor of 4 in change projects. ~  D

more...
larry costello's comment, May 15, 4:11 PM
For successful change you must have engagement, there's no engagement without trust.
Brett Bearfield's comment, May 15, 8:10 PM
I am not sure I fully buy into the comment that "these approaches often failed"....GE and several other companies have demonstrated progress here, I have 7 lean/black belts on my team who have been very effective in driving change in the Pharmacy. That being said, the practice (at least for us) that has proven results is getting our front line associates engaged AND ensuring that we call them by name as the people who made it possible. Good Lean professionals understand to defer the credit and watching the people grow is their reward.
Louis Fernandez MD's comment, May 15, 9:46 PM
Engagement starts by giving all the stakeholders a say in how and what to change. Most of the questions that we are facing as an organization have the answers in the front lines. The associates that operationalize the work see where the inefficiencies, confusion, and barriers lay. They also have the best perspective to suggest how to improve the process. The storytelling that has been mentioned in the articles and the post is the vehicle to set change in motion and give it direction. Everyone like to listen to stories because they can inspire and motivate us. Why is it that the story developers are usually very removed from the front lines where the problem lives? Why do we have remote teams try to fix problems that they do not experience first hand? Think we need to answer these before we move on.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

What's the real finish line? Prosci's 2014 research report features sustainability, reinforcing actions

What's the real finish line?  Prosci's 2014 research report features sustainability, reinforcing actions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

From Prosci's Best Practices Benchmarking report - "The data is clear - organizations that are planning and resourcing for reinforcement are more likely to meet or exceed project objectives than organizations that neglect this critical step in the change process."


____________________
   
Only 44% reported that resources were allocated to reinforcement and sustainment activities

____________________

    
Participants in the 2013 benchmarking study were asked if reinforcement and sustainment activities were planned for as part of their projects. Sixty-one percent of participants planned for these activities.

   

Participants were also asked if project resources were allocated to the reinforcement and sustainment activities. Only 44% reported that resources were allocated to this effort.

   

Participants who allocated resources to reinforcement and sustainment activities reported greater success rates on their projects.  [Data collected] shows that 60% of participants who allocated resources to reinforcement and sustainment activities met or exceeded project objectives, compared to 53% of those who did not allocate resources to reinforcement.

___________________
   
...we are often already moving on to the next change...reinforcement efforts can often fall
short.
___________________
   
    
...reinforcement can be difficult because once a change is finished, we are often already moving on to the next change. It takes concerted effort and time to make sure a change "sticks" - and given the scarce resources and change saturation that many organizations face, reinforcement efforts can often fall short.
         
We see this scenario playing out in the data. A little more than half of organizations are planning for reinforcement and sustainment activities, but fewer than half are dedicating resources to this effort.
      
The data is clear - organizations that are planning and resourcing for reinforcement are more likely to meet or exceed project objectives than organizations that neglect this critical step in the change process.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
The race is not over when reaching the early finish line of a change project's objectives.  The second leg of the race,  is a marathon finish line that is the more important for a change to truly be fully implemented:  funding sustainment and reinforcing the change as real, "yes this is a permanent" change.  


Including resources to sustain change is often overlooked in change projects, and can becomes a part of the ubiquitous change project 70% failure rate.  

Helping people with reinforcing systems in the new behaviors is essential.  Remember the classic William Bridges model starting with endings and then the neutral zone.  Continue to provide a solid foundation for new beginnings to fully take root. 

Put another way, make sure you make it to the real finish line, with behavioral results and other people connected measures, not just the one on a project plan or in an administrators report. ~ D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 25, 10:35 AM

When planning resources for a change project, it's important to include resources to sustain the change, which is often overlooked and then becomes a part of the ubiquitous change project 70% failure rate.  

The race is not over when reaching the early finish line of a change project's objectives.  There is a second leg of the race, a marathon finish line that is the more important for a change to truly be fully implemented:  funding sustainment and reinforcing the change as real, "yes this is a permanent" change.  


Helping people with reinforcing systems in the new behaviors is essential.  Remember the classic William Bridges model starting with endings and then the neutral zone.  Continue to provide a solid foundation for new beginnings to fully take root.

Put another way, make sure you make it to the real finish line, with behavioral results and other people connected measures, not just the one on a project plan or in an administrators report. ~ D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 3:54 PM

Is this obvious?  According to the research, it is not! ~ D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What trumps vision & shared values, beyond corporate culture restraints

What trumps vision & shared values, beyond corporate culture restraints | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

...There is a lot to be said for providing a shared context, shared values and a common set of behavioural guidelines. However...it is critical to ensure that the limitations of the culture are acknowledged.


Paradoxically, it is only when these limitations are recognized that the corporate culture is most effective. [Bold in the original.]


Here are 3 of Allon's 5 examples of behaviours that a corporate culture cannot change:
 

  • When a  culture prefers discretion to transparency, discretion will reign.
     
  • When age dictates seniority, younger managers will not be respected.
    
  • Where loyalty to boss reigns supreme, team work in the western sense will falter.

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.
                 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Another culture and change gem from Allon Shevat.  He will challenge, appropriately so, all the sacred cows of corporate culture and change management.


I, for one, appreciate his dichotomy of relationships vs. process (as a process consultant myself.)  It reminds me, "it's all about relationships" everywhere, everytime.  From there you build.  Without relationship, nothing lasting will be built.  ~  D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 17, 11:14 AM

As this is attracting attention in the Change Management Resources stream, I'm sharing it in BEST of the BEST - a culture and change gem from Allon Shevat.  He will challenge, appropriately so, all the sacred cows of corporate culture and change management.


I, for one, appreciate his dichotomy of relationships vs. process (as a process consultant myself.)  It reminds me, "it's all about relationships" everywhere, everytime.  From there you build.  Without relationship, nothing lasting will be built.  ~  D