Change Management Resources
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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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5 Strategies to Lead Change, Using Liberating Structures

5 Strategies to Lead Change, Using Liberating Structures | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Five key concepts and supporting research and tools will help you lead through adaptive change in a VUCA world, one that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous, as presented in Mexico City for CPA firm leaders at the Russell Bedford International conference, yet applicable for any leader.

 

Included:  

Researchers showed that out of 20 distinct leadership traits identified in organizations whose leadership performance was strong, high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior; these 4 behaviors explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness

1. Solving problems effectively.

2. Operating with a strong results orientation.

3. Seeking different perspectives.

4. Supporting others.

This is from the McKinsey Quarterly, first published in 1964, which now offers the perspective today that “much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant,” (Dobbs, 2014.) McKinsey forecasts a crash of:

1) technological disruption,

2) rapid emerging-markets growth, and

3) widespread aging as “long-held assumptions [give] way, and seemingly powerful business models [become] upended.”


Sound familiar? Are you ready? 



Read the full article with SlideShare and handouts here on LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-strategies-lead-change-using-liberating-structures-deb-nystrom?trk=prof-post


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New Online Edition Coming: Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants

New Online Edition Coming:  Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

A new, 4th edition and NOW online guide, easily updated, is coming, helpful to organization development and change management practitioners everywhere.

Here's the print version, listed at Wiley.  2nd Edition - William J. Rothwell, Roland L. Sullivan



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm thrilled to have been invited to submit a chapter on organization development, change management and change leadership for review for late August.   A colleague who is finishing is PhD, Ron Koller, will also be submitting his new research for another chapter based on change resistance.

I am looking forward to working through what I've learned in my change experiences over the past 20 years at a major research university as well as as an independent in the last 5 years, working with businesses to share practice, actionable lessons learned.  ~  Deb

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Lead Through Personality Complexity: Enough with Change Resistance Already!

Lead Through Personality Complexity:  Enough with Change Resistance Already! | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

People don't resist change, they resist being changed. Enough with regurgitating this awesome quote, start THINKING about what it means!


______________

...there’s no way to “ensure” everyone is progressing through the change at the same rate and same intensity.

______________


...Explore the symptoms of resistance:


[Try] using David Kersey’s Temperaments combined with the stages of Satir:

  • Satir Change Model Stages: Old Status Quo, Foreign Element, Chaos, Transforming Idea, Practice and Integration, New Status Quo.  This model explains how people respond to change physically, psychologically and logically.
David Kersey’s Temperaments (Carl Jung based):

  • SP (Artisans): Live for the chaos! Love the excitement... inventing problems that might not exist so they have “something to solve.
  • SJ (Guardians): Fight to preserve the status quo because it’s familiar...because they don’t want to dive into chaos until they know every possible detail of the change
  • NF (Harmonizers): Help people through the pain of chaos...Will want to not implement a change if it’ll upset the ‘herd.’
  • NT (Rationals): Fly through the change when it appeases their logic and moves on to the next change before anyone else has integrated the first change.


...Imagine...a team with people [with] competing preferences trying to make sense of an Agile transformation? How about if you have Artisans [the author of this piece - Jason Little] keeping the organization in a constant state of chaos?    ....Now I realize it isn’t “the other people”, it’s my approach.  


 ...I need to know when to push, and when to lay off...and I didn’t even touch the hundreds of cognitive biases that affect how people respond to change. 


...you cannot put a budget and schedule on change, there’s no way to “ensure” everyone is progressing through the change at the same rate and same intensity.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

     

             

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leading through complexity is an essential element of change management.  This post  is a good reminder of the layers of difference in change adoption - useful for Jungians - and the MBTI familiar  (Myers Briggs, Keirsey) as well as those using similar personality tools.  


It's also a good reminder for leaders, who know the nuances of any personality assessment.  It highlights that your perspective is quite limited.  Different perspectives of those on your leadership team, if they are diverse and helpful in their differences, and speak up, is of great value in true leadership teamwork.  ~  D

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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, May 19, 2014 5:06 PM

Because complexity management has something to do with emergence, and emergence leads to change...

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 19, 2014 3:34 PM
Some great shares here. Thanks for the comments and thanks everyone!
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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.
________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  

I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I found Ron's chart very direct, humorous and a bit sobering.  How does it match your change project stories?  ~  Deb

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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 3:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 10:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb

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Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation

Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How about a step beyond the change agents and focusing on the people who matter most, frontline employees and managers, in working through change transition?


Read about the study that provides a conceptual bridge from change readiness (pre-change) to change implementation (post-change).


Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


       

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More helpful scholarly work from Ron Koller on making it through the change process, from readiness to and THROUGH implementation. - Deb

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How to See Progress in Your Change Implementation and Adapt

How to See Progress in Your Change Implementation and Adapt | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you or a colleague are:

  • are in an organization with 100+ staff and,
  • are launching or experiencing a change implementation, and
  • are interested in data-driven adjustments to your change strategy and tactics


Contact Ron Koller, the author of this change post, to learn about his free and/or low cost change surveys (with published results) that could greatly assist your knowledge of what's working and what isn't in your change implementation, so that you make be better able to make agile adjustments.  


Click here for more information on your potential Change Study's details.   

Also, a free report that summarizes some of Ron's initial research is here on his companion Change Management site.


 You can also contact me for general questions.  


~  Deb

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Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum

Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it



Dr. Coetsee reasons that a person begins with apathy, a state that is neither for or against the change.   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Ron highlights Dr. Coetsee's support of Judson's continuum concept with a more organic configuration as a flow model.

Stay tuned for more news of Ron's additional work on the topic of resistance and choice in this flow model, including overcommitment.  

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:42 PM
@Luca, thanks for your support and sharing. :-)
Luca Appia's comment, January 25, 2013 9:08 PM
@Deb, thank you too for this articles :-)
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Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions

Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Reductionism [is useful] in understanding and managing the world around us.     However the possibility space is now expanding to higher levels of resolution such as a focus on complex systems. Learning and tools are ratcheting in lock-step.


Via juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a handy list for referencing complexity theory in a practical way.  Many change projects reference concepts mentioned here including non-linear dynamics, networks, chaos, fractals, and power laws.  ~ Deb

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Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question? What's the Goal?

Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question?  What's the Goal? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The answers we get out of data will always depend on the questions we ask.


Useful.  It also reminded me of one of the tools we use in Whole Scale change thinking:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate, or DPPE.  Thanks to twitter follower  @resilientchange for this link this week.


_______________________________

"Throughout history ....science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

_______________________________



Excerpts:


Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.


One key role we play in the process is choosing which data to look at. That this choice is often made for us by what happens to be easiest to measure doesn't make it any less consequential, as Samuel Arbesman writes, 


  • "Throughout history, in one field after another, science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."


In his book,  political forecaster Nate Silver writes about a crucial element, how we go about revising our views as new data comes in.


Silver is a big believer in the Bayesian approach to probability, in which we all have our own subjective ideas about how things are going to pan out, but follow the same straightforward rules in revising those assessments as we get new information.


It's a process that uses data to refine our thinking. But it doesn't work without some thinking first.


Read the full article here.


Perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining via Reveln.


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Horror stories, language and lessons: Building Change Capability

Horror stories, language and lessons: Building Change Capability | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

No Trust = Minimal and ineffective change - with a true horror story ERP failed implementation to bring it home.


See Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve for the full model.

   
In this change practitioner group's MeetUp a key question emerged:  How do you build, manage and reward trust through successful engagements and implementations of change?

   

Take the horror story shared:

   

  • a large-scale ERP implementation that with 8 hours to go until commencement of training, cancelled the training courses and disrupted delegates who were flying from across the country to attend.” The client never regained trust in the solution being delivered or the solution provider managing the change.

   

  • Lack of trust can lead to a horror story, or like with the story above, a horror story can lead to a lack of trust. 

   

_______________________
   
Lack of trust can lead to a horror story...or a horror story can lead to a lack of trust.

_______________________


Other excerpts: 

  

  • Our job is made harder by the fact that sometimes it’s best not to call change “change” and it can be difficult knowing when and who that rule applies to.

  

On language and labels, including internal change champions:

      

  • Often even they don’t want to be associated with the change by title. It’s as if labelling someone a “Change Capability Manager” or “Change Champion” gives the rest of the organisation the right to lump that person who has “change” in their title with all the stuff they’d rather not manage themselves.

Via Virtual Global Coaching
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Living in An Interconnected Society - The Good, the Bad & the Potential, Tiffany Shlain

Tiffany Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards, through video illustrates today's interconnected society at The Economist's 2012 event in San Francisco.

  

_____________________________

   

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time.

_____________________________



What does it mean to live in a connected world? How is it changing us, our culture and the planet?

 

Her film "Connected"  illustrates:

  

Technology is changing the way we connect with people around us.   ...We have accumulated so much knowledge, yet we have trouble seeing the bigger picture. Perhaps it is time to declare our interdependence.

 

_____________________________

   

It's the beginning of a participatory revolution.

_____________________________


Close to 2 billion people on-line with 5 billion cell phones. It's the beginning of a participatory revolution. Ideas are free to interact, cross pollinate, creating hybrid perspectives all over the world.

 

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time. ...Once we understand the supply chains and see their results, we'll be more thoughtful about our behavior.

 

Tiffany Shlain favorite quote:  "Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even further."

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change and Ongoing Discussions"


Video here: [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRTnUKpDGWs]


Via janlgordon, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Ken Morrison's comment, August 17, 2012 9:38 AM
Thanks for sharing this. I took an online course from Howard Rheingold, who is in this film a few times.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, August 20, 2012 12:00 PM
Thank you for the rescoops. I really like this quote:
"Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even farther"

Best of luck on your scoop.it site. I like what I see here.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, September 2, 2012 7:53 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. I really hope that this video project is successful for her organization.
Ken
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Strategic Agility? FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous

Strategic Agility?  FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world:  Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"If you stand still, you’ll fall behind in today’s VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. Movement alone, however, doesn’t guarantee success." ~ Liz Guthridge


Great post by Liz!  On her blog, I commented that Liz speaks to a practical tool for VUCA preparedness so well, especially in cultivating a state of strategic agility, a big interest of mine this past year in assisting clients.


Excerpts:

.

By committing to FLIP (focus, listen, involve and personalize), you’re leading from wherever you are. And you’re serving as a role model to encourage others to be active, not passive, about your responsibilities.

.

With #3, INVOLVE, Liz talks about smart-mob organizing, bringing together groups of people for a common business challenge or social change.  This can easily include social media or other technology.

  • Liz is conducting a Best Practice Institute webinar on Change Through Crowdsourcing: How to Use Peer-by-Peer Practices to Transform Organizations on June 19 at 2 pm

.

With smart mobs, you can collaborate and cooperate in new, clever ways faster and more effective than ever before.

.

Rather than be content living with uncertainty and ambiguity in a VUCA world, you’re switching them around. You’re showing “agility” instead of “ambiguity” by seeking “understanding” instead of floundering in uncertainty.


Full post here.

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10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection

10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Leading change is about being connected to and engaging everyone affected by the change, a strength of social media.

 

Change leaders have engaged infrastructure that includes social media in other examples on this newsletter curation stream including IBM, Proctor & Gamble and Apple.

 

Excerpts:

Acceptance of change – processes, services, working relationships, policies and more - can be accelerated across the organization through the real-time sharing of experiences.

 

Social networking and collaboration applications are extremely effective ways of bringing employees together to perform new processes and to share experiences – both the successes and the temporary setbacks. People with common interests or related roles can form communities to learn from and support one another.

 

 Deb:  At key points, it's important to create the environments and provide several good tools that allow staff to do this for themselves, instead of attempting to engineer all of this from the top.  Social media policies and guidelines help immensely.


Via Virtual Global Coaching, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Top Tips For Leading Technology Change In Schools

Top Tips For Leading Technology Change In Schools | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

One challenge is understanding the actual training needs of your colleagues:

 

  • Some present as vaguely competent and actually have very little idea of how to use devices to support learning
  • Others...hide under a bushel a deep and valuable understanding and set of of skills. 

 

_____________________________
   
Some people will need ...intensive support ...you will need to make a judgement about ...what constitutes ‘enough’ progress for this term/ year

 

_____________________________

 

Unless your staff is small and stable, it’s likely that you won’t have the in-depth knowledge you need to design a training program that meets everyone’s needs. For this, a Training Needs Analysis (TNA) tool is required. An example is listed here.

 

It serves a number of purposes:

   

  • to identify those most in need of intensive support;
     
  • to identify those who might be able to support others, particularly in specific areas of expertise;
      
  • to help you plan large-scale training aimed at common areas of weakness/ concern;
   
  • to help you plan training targeted at smaller groups (e.g. the English department), based on a better understanding of their skills.
     

It's best administered online survey and analyzed via a spreadsheet.
Some people will need really intensive support and you will need to make a judgement about who should get your time and what constitutes ‘enough’ progress for this term/ year.

Some teachers will resist the change, whatever you do to support them. This is something that many 1-to-1 leaders struggle with, pouring time and energy into trying to shift the most stubborn of refuseniks.

Our advice? Put your effort where it is likely to have an outcome and ‘ignore the haters’. If you can create momentum with 75% of staff, they may carry the rest with them.  ...Teach to the top end.

Top tips:

  1. Full support of Leadership team with regular communication;
  2. A defined Director of Technology role for implementation;
  3. Regular training sessions with support available by email, in lessons and 1-to-1;
  4. Model good practice and offer lesson observations;
  5. Implement a student Digital Leader programme;
  6. Identify a staff technology champion in every department;
  7. Remember that use of the technology is always about learning not the device;
  8. Find quick wins that make the change worthwhile for staff;
  9. Focus your time on the positives.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These are great tips, also following the "early adopters, early majority" model of how change happens in learning organizations.  ~  Deb

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4 Strategies To Deal With Ambiguity, Today's New Normal

4 Strategies To Deal With Ambiguity, Today's New Normal | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Excerpted:


Expect more ambiguity not just as you go up the career ladder, but as a growing workplace phenomenon. With more complexity, speed, change and competition, more decisions will have to be made with less data and certainty.


_____________________


Release yourself and your team from the prison of perfectionism. 

_____________________



Strategies to get you thinking:


1. Set expectations with your team and all stakeholders that it is an ambiguous situation you are working through. It will take time and experimentation.


2. Be clear about the problem you are trying to solve.


3. Release yourself and your team from the prison of perfectionism. 

_____________________


Run towards the lack of clarity and actively wrestle with it.

_____________________
 

[DN: The strategies below were embedded in tip #3 but deserve their own listing, because change consultants know, culture DOES trump strategy, every time.  Culture & strategy work in tandem.]

4.  Create a group culture around taking risks. Try a few small experiments. Learn, quickly course correct, and keep making progress.

Run towards the lack of clarity and actively wrestle with it. As you continue in your career, you are going to have to get good at it!

Marian Cook is currently the head of IT for a mid-market healthcare market leader of products, services and education. She leads a 100 person IT division with a major Oracle R12 implementation underway. She is currently on the Chicago's Mayor's Council of Technology.


WITI's Web site provides visitors with news, career opportunities, articles and info to empower women through technology.

Photo by by Lori Greig, Flickr


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

    

     

   
  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There are limited resources out there about to deal with ambiguity. This IT leader's points are useful in the change arena, including releasing one's own self from the "prison of perfection" - which I'd label the illusion of control.  Theory U has some good concepts for going further in dealing with ambiguity; my references are listed above.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 11, 2014 4:57 PM

There are limited resources out there about to deal with ambiguity. This IT leader's points are useful in the change arena, including releasing one's own self from the "prison of perfection" - which I'd label the illusion of control.  Theory U has some good concepts for going further in dealing with ambiguity; my references are listed above.  ~  Deb

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Change Warriors: They Master Four Solutions

Change Warriors: They Master Four Solutions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many management gurus, academics, and CEOs are writing on change, yet there is a difference between the theoretical and academic, and actual change


...top-down compliance approach[es], where the senior team determines the new direction, strategies and mission. In some cases, after much effort, leaders give up or lose energy.

Some even find that people are more disillusioned than before.

Yet there are successes -- when leaders become 
Change Warriors and not Change Worriers.


Related posts by Deb:

   
    




Via Virtual Global Coaching
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Where does the academic meet the practical? This  is a helpful summary on getting past traditional change barriers and includes co-creation as a key element. ~  Deb

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Tools Review ~ And Change: Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Tools Review ~ And Change:  Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As this book fits measurement and planning, it should also be a great resource for anyone working through change.  Not doing may be smarter than doing when it comes to using certain approaches and tools.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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Deeply fortifying: How to establish high quality connections

Deeply fortifying: How to establish high quality connections | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Disrespectful behaviour and their effects...can be changed by establishing what Dr. Dutton calls “high quality connections ”or HQCs for short.

What a way to look at a tipping point for behavioral change, from abundance instead of from deficiency.

According to researcher Jane Dutton from the University of Michigan, disrespectful engagement depletes energy and thus motivation and commitment and may lead to burnout.

In the journal Stanford Social Innovation Review, she illustrates some cases of disrespectful behaviour and their effects, and then outlines how such behaviours can be changed by establishing what she calls “high quality connections”.

These pathways are (excerpted):
  • Respectful engagement: being there ...and really listening.
  • Task enabling: help another person being successful, ...find out what other person’s goals are.
  • Building trust: making the first step that signals that you are ...trustworthy
  • Playing: inviting the other person for a kind of game
 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The cut-e ScienceBlog has captured a helpful summary of Professor Jane Dutton's 4 minute video clip and her journal article on what high quality connections are, why they are worth striving for, and the pathways to building them.

Click on the title to access the video and to listen to Jane's talk and to see the references.  ~  Deb

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3 Types of Commitment to Change: What creates the best, sustainable success?

3 Types of Commitment to Change:  What creates the best, sustainable success? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Do you experience different forms of commitment in your change experience?  

Do they follow these 3 forms of commitment?
  • Want to = Affective

  • Have to = Continuance 

  • Ought to = Normative
    
Ron's (author & researcher) main line of inquiry will be "which of these forms of commitment result in the highest level of sustainable performance?"

A related post from Deb, with Ron's links included:

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you or a colleague are:


* are in an organization with 100+ staff and,
* are launching or experiencing a change implementation, and
* are interested in data-driven adjustments to your change strategy and tactics


Ron Koller, the author of this change post, is offering free and/or low cost change surveys that could greatly assist your knowledge of what's working and what isn't in your change implementation.


Understanding the nature of change, and making it practical, is the impetus behind Ron Koller's current change study work to complete his PhD.


Contact Ron Koller, the author of this change post, to learn about his free and/or low cost change surveys (with published results) that could greatly assist your knowledge of what's working and what isn't in your change implementation, so that you make be better able to make agile adjustments.

 

For more info contact Ron directly or me for details.  ~ Deb

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Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks

Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
You’ve probably experienced it, that uncomfortable feeling of letting go of something tried and formerly true without knowing what is coming next. Welcome to the Neutral Zone, coined by chang...


For now, consider that the middle state of letting go to enter the Neutral Zoneincludes building improved learning agility, a developmental process as we:


1) UnLearnlet go and prepare to accept something new,

2) Adapt, pilot and test new thinking and behaviors, and

3) Demonstrate New Learning (accept and refine new behaviors.)


A great metaphor for developing agility in learning can be found in rediscovering, and perhaps fully clarifying former misunderstanding of the classic change management research of Kurt Lewin. With credit to researcher Ron Koller, Lewin’s more nuanced, elegant original change work is diagrammed below.  His work has been oversimplified over the years as simply:  


1) Unfreeze,

2) Moving (Change), and

3) Refreeze2 (into the new state. )


See the full diagram of Lewin's original interrupted time series design in the full post here as well as what is key from Lewin and other change research.


Photo credit:   VinothChandar

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts in which I have the delight of uncovering a deeper, clearer understanding of the original change work of Kurt Lewin, as well as offering a Learning Agility perspective connected to current stories, Bob Johansen's VUCA perspective and Bridge's classic transitions work (a two-parter.)  


Thanks for stopping by!  ~  Deb

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Building Commitment During an ERP Rollout

In this e-book, Luc Galoppin and Daryl Conner bring together their insights on commitment and social architecture. Learn how the eight stages of commitment apply to an ERP rollout and why it is crucial to carefully plan the moments-of-truth.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Daryl Conner's commitment curve is handily illustrated with sketch designs notes, thanks to Luc and Daryl's ebook style Slideshare.  It's a useful reference for any change project, including but not limited to an ERP rollout.  ~  Deb

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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

______________________________

   

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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Change Community: Writing an Online Community Plan - How To

Change Community:  Writing an Online Community Plan - How To | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

If you plan on building an online community you must have a plan - not a strategy, but a community plan. The list below will help you develop your plan and improve the growth and experience of your community. 

   

The plan is relevant for  social communities, blogging, email marketing and just about anywhere else online.

    

Recommendation: Create an online community plan and then segment each category with their own responsibilities


DN:  I suggest a thorough answer to this question before the steps below:  What is the purpose of being in the community?  (Short & long term.)

  

Elements:

  

1.  Who runs the community.   A leader. Choose one person (responsibility, control, standards, expectations) to manage the online community.  

  

2.  Build community persona.  Who you are targeting to join?  Include demographics, habits and attitudes, vehicle types they drive, education levels, average annual income, marital status, number of kids, etc. 

  

3. Early focus.   Focus on 20-50 people that fall into your persona descriptions, to encourage early joining.

  

4.  Why should they join?  Be prepared to explain why these people should join:

  • Value proposition?  
  • Increase their stature in the off-line community?  
  • Increased visibility or fame?  

  

5. Retaining new members.  What is your plan to get them engaged and to retain them?  Defined your process to get new members engaged immediately or they will lose interest.  Assign a dedicated member to mentor each new member that joins the community for about 3 weeks.  Provide the opportunity to engage, ask questions, recommendations.

  

6.  Community happenings.  Short-term and long-term - activities

  

7.  How will you grow the community?  Exclusive?  Grow a massive community?  Define your clear vision of how to or not to promote the community for growth.

  

8.  Platform selection.  Explain your choice via the  type of community you are building - note  forums, mailing lists, newsgroups, etc.

  

9. Content creation.  Create a content calendar, plan for content creation at least 4-6 weeks out when you launch.  Stay at least 30 days ahead of publishing. Assign responsibilities for management, creation, editing, and publishing of the content for the community.

  

10.  Value.   [DN:  See purpose & vision, to ensure this is delivered!]

  

Sourcehttp://bit.ly/M8xgMu

  

Resources

   

Plan for Content Creation --  http://bit.ly/Pil9Sa

The Social Media TuneUp -- http://bit.ly/KXr88R


Via maxOz
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March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @ ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012

March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @  ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012 | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


As a curator of CMRsite.com for which this is the curation stream on ScoopIt as well as Change Leadership Watch, I'm pleased to be on a unique panel to share diverse perspectives on the role of the Trusted Advisor in today's turbulent world.  


We'll also be trying something new at global conference of this nature, using Open Space to explore the nature of collaborative learning within a session format.


Note the approaching conference deadline of March 15, 2012.


Here's a few excerpts from our program as well as from Liz Guthridge, who is facilitating our panel and organized this conference event:


What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


My colleague, Liz Guthridge, has written a helpful post about the Trusted Advisor role in supporting the work of leaders, outlining what we'll be covering in our session at ACMP Las Vegas. An excerpt:


[Liz] re-read quite a few of David Maister’s tips, primarily from his book, The Trusted Advisor...[a] 2000 classic. ...Some favorite things:


  • “I am not the center of the universe.”
  • “A point of view doesn’t commit you for life.”
  • “Reach out to notice, and acknowledge, something that has been held back in or about the other person.”
  • “Who am I serving by my present approach?”
  • “Assigning blame will trap me; taking responsibility will empower me.”
.
There's more, including biographies of who is presenting on the panel, photos, including yours truly, and links to register for the conference.
.
Do comment if you plan to attend.  It would be great to see you there!
~  Deb
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