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The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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New Online Edition Coming: Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants

New Online Edition Coming:  Practicing Organization Development: A Guide for Consultants | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

A new, 4th edition and NOW online guide, easily updated, is coming, helpful to organization development and change management practitioners everywhere.

Here's the print version, listed at Wiley.  2nd Edition - William J. Rothwell, Roland L. Sullivan



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm thrilled to have been invited to submit a chapter on organization development, change management and change leadership for review for late August.   A colleague who is finishing is PhD, Ron Koller, will also be submitting his new research for another chapter based on change resistance.

I am looking forward to working through what I've learned in my change experiences over the past 20 years at a major research university as well as as an independent in the last 5 years, working with businesses to share practice, actionable lessons learned.  ~  Deb

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Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes

Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

'Antifragile' is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility.

Many readers misunderstand Taleb’s core message.  They assume that because Taleb writes about unseen and improperly calculated risks, his objective must be to reduce or eliminate risk.  Nothing could be further from the truth. 


Antifragile is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility. 


Rather than reduce risk, organize your life, your business or your society in such a way that it benefits from randomness and the occasional Black Swan event.


Taleb’s own life is a case in point.  He had the free time to write Fooled, The Black Swan and Antifragile because—in his own words—he made “F___ you money” during the greatest Black Swan event of our lifetimes, the 1987 stock market crash.  


...Taleb’s trading style is antifragile, had the 1987 crash never happened, Taleb would not have been materially hurt.  His trading style puts little at risk but allows for outsized returns.



Other antifragile Scoops:

    

         
         

    Deb's related posts:

         

        
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Taleb's coinage of "Antifragile" is compelling.  Change practitioners might find this a useful concept to understanding how to survive and thrive in a VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous) world.  ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 17, 2013 2:57 PM
    Anne, your layering encourages critical nuanced views beyond the book's "shiny new term" idea. Sometimes the first thing to do is "not do," as in, don't just do something, stand there. Doe we need an "intervention?" What are the other perspectives available, thinking systemically? Re: Iatrogenics: From the "Black Swan Report: "...the argument of Chapters 21 and 22 on the convexity of iatrogenics (only treat the VERY ill): Mortality is convex to blood pressure."
    Anne Caspari's comment, April 22, 2013 9:42 AM
    Hi Deb, thanks :-). I also reckon there are MANY fresh perspectives on how to handle different systems (or leave them alone), may they be health, financial, socio-political, ecological.... I love it and keep smiling to myself when I see the aha - moments on applied convexity/anti/fragility pop up in daily life, business and otherwise... compliments also on your scoops...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 22, 2013 10:16 PM
    Thanks Anne. Systems and org. groupies a bit, maybe. ;-)
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    80 Ideas for a Happy Workplace - Learnfizz

    The Happy Manifesto sets out a vision of happier workplaces. It is based on what organisations might look like if how they were organised and managed was decided by the people who are managed.


    Examples:


    Basics 
    1. Find a way to delight a customer today
    4. Find ways to make working together more fun and sociable


    Trust your people

    5. Pre-approve: A new approach, a problem to solve – get an individual or group to find a solution and then implement it without checking back with you.
    14. Pass the knowledge on to your people, so they don’t need things approved.
    15. Have your people write their own job descriptions.
    16. Let people choose their own job title (or abolish job titles altogether.)


    Make your people feel good

    39. Help your people find a real challenge, and support them to achieve it
    40. Create a quiet space, where an individual’s presence is trusted, respected and allowed to just be for a while.


    Related posts by Deb:



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    10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

    10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

    "Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.


    ________________________________

        

    Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

        

    ________________________________


    I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


    "General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

    [to holism],says that each variable in any system

    interacts with the other variables

    so thoroughly that cause and effect

    cannot be separated.


    A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

    Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

    You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

    a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

    Relationship is everything."    

    - Marilyn Ferguson,  

    The Aquarian Conspiracy



    A sample from her blog post:


    She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:


    • Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.
      
    • DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.
       
       
    • Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.
       
    • Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.


    She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!



    Read the full post here.

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    6 Words for Chaos ~ High Creative, Low on Scale, Implications for International Change

    6 Words for Chaos ~ High Creative, Low on Scale, Implications for International Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

    Two from the list of six:

    “”Bardak”,a Turkish borrowed word meaning messy and disorganized, although the translation is “brothel”.


    “Buka-umavulaka”, an Aramaic borrow word, a “high level” form of speech, also implying very very deep chaos.


    Balagan, yet another popular borrowed word to describe lack of order.

       

    The great number of words available represents a linguistic need to differentiate between various levels of  poor organization of of our society
        
    Reasons for this disorder are:


    1) A disdain for planning, which is seen as a luxury of the opulent.


    2) A lack of belief in systems, and massive use of relationships to bypass systems.


    3) The proclivity to re-open decisions because nothing is very final, ever.


    4) An immigrant society with few shared ways of doing things.


    5) Belief that the individual is and must be empowered with ingenuity to work around barriers and obstacles.


    All of the above create a large balagan, and a lot of creativity, and a low level of scalability


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

              

        

          

            

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Allon's blogs contain helpful insights into international change considerations and why structure will only take you so far if other considerations are met in working through issues of chaos and complexity. ~ D

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    Systems in Action: Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco

    Systems in Action:  Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

    Change is constant. And technology has always been about change and convergence. "This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit."


    Massive, global-scale change occurring now is happening at rates faster than anyone ever predicted.

    How Big is “Everything”?

    The Internet of Everything will create $14.4 trillion in value at stake through the combination of increased revenues and lower costs in just the next ten years – creating an opportunity to increase global corporate profits by an estimated 21% over the next decade.


    The five main factors fueling this value are:


    • Asset utilization: $2.5 trillion in reduced costs
    • Employee productivity: $2.5 trillion in greater labor efficiencies
    • Supply chain and logistics: $2.7 trillion through eliminating waste
    • Customer intimacy: $3.7 trillion through addition of more customers
    • Innovation: $3.0 trillion through reducing time to market
        

    Collaboration ties in throughout these factors. This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit: Small businesses, enterprises, service providers, system integrators, device makers are all critical to building out the connections and scaling experiences across every industry.

     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is the promising side of big data and collaboration.  What do you see in your categories of cost & benefit and abundance in this thinking?  ~  Deb

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    Understanding simple, complicated, complex, and chaos in Systems Thinking

    " If you manage a complex organization as if it were just a complicated one, you’ll make serious, expensive mistakes.”


    Most of the approaches used to address complex system are approaches for complicated system ( Six Sigma, Balance Scorecard, …).


    But how to work in a complex system ?  


    According to Gökçe Sargut and Rita Gunther McGrath , they recommend to:
        
    · Improve the way you forecast by using tools/models that simulate the behavior of the system. Process Behaviour Chart (see Shewart)
    · Improve the way you mitigate risk by minimizing the need to rely on predictions/expectations to experiment, by…
    · Make different resource tradeoffs by providing diversity of thoughts and by investing in incremental and small investment in new project/approaches.



    They describe some of the essential parts of " a system of profound knowledge" :
    • appreciation for a system, 
    • knowledge about variation, 
    • theory of knowledge, and 
    • psychology. 
         
    The system of profound knowledge is a complex system as we've to consider it a a network of interdependent components that work together to accomplish the purpose of the system.
       
    The  4 interrelated parts can't be understood if separated from one another.
         
    As Deming said : "Rational prediction requires theory and builds knowledge through systematic revision and extension of the theory based on comparison of prediction with observation."(Deming, The New Economics). 
         
    The system of profound knowledge is based on the premise that management is prediction.  
        
    If we fail to predict what we expect  ("Theory), we fail to predict the results of our experiment to improve, we fail to analyze the results of our experiment and we fail to learn about our system.
         
    So we don't improve. 
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    As many large change projects ARE in complex systems, dealing with forecasts (alternate scenarios included), and risk and resource allocation changes IS key to agile  & appropriate change plans.  ~  D

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    Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

    Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

    Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

       

    The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

       

     _______________________________

       

    “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

     _______________________________

          

    Excerpted:

       

    Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


    1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
    2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

       

    There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


    We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

      

    ...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

      

    ...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

      

    They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

      

    Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

      

    They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


    See the full post here.

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