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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In

Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Your intuition is never enough.

    

Why do organizations so often introduce ...new initiatives without thinking about this important step of testing?   (From an HBR blog post excerpted below.)

      

...Confirmation bias and the escalation of commitment lead organizations to refrain from evaluating changes because the key decision makers feel (erroneously) that they already know that the changes are good ones. The unfortunate result is that organizations persist in implementing ineffective policies and fail to even contemplate the possibility of superior alternatives.

     

That’s where experimental testing comes in. By forcing organizations to clearly articulate their goals and then to rigorously judge their decisions by those metrics, experimental tests can help managers avoid costly mistakes and can open up the consideration of other possible solutions.

     

....A handful of organizations have already embraced the principles of behavioral economics and the experimental mindset. One is the Walt Disney Company’s R&D department, where one of us spent a summer. After identifying areas for cost reduction or process streamlining, it would design randomized experiments to test the effectiveness of possible changes.  The full HBR post is here, or as with REVELN ScoopIt post, click on the photo or title.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Have you tried testing, piloting, and these forms of experimenting before planning or preparing for large scale, whole system change implementation within your culture?   The article lists several examples of those who have, including Disney and a tech support center.   

Germany, who has gone back to a tuition free model for higher education, tested, voluntarily, tuition models by region.  Volunteers are a great way to build early commitment and home-grown stories to support change.  ~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:45 AM

The article lists several examples of those who have done successful experimental testing of change, including Disney and a tech support center.   Add to that Germany, a country that has gone back to a tuition free model for higher education and who tested, voluntarily, tuition models by region.  Volunteers are a great way to build early commitment and home-grown stories to support change.  

I'm preparing to send out the monthly "Best of the Best" newsletter from my nine ScoopIt streams.  If you are interested, check out any of the "gold boxes" on REVELN.com to sign up to receive it for free. ~  Deb 

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Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed: MSN Money & HBR

Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed:  MSN Money & HBR | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Let employees tell their stories. ~ The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer."


This reminds me "slow is fast," from Theory U, popularized by Otto Scharmer.  This thinking is not new to change strategy, but it can be difficult to those used to cascade implementations. 

The power of story is very real when combined with honest questions, that is, if you ask the question, you are truely open to hearing and responding fully to the answers. ~ Deb


_______________________


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows.   

_______________________


Excerpts:   


"Conventional approaches to change management urge leaders to set a vision and cascade it down the organization.


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows. The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer.


Instead of dictating how the organization will evolve, take a high-involvement approach. Describe the problem you are trying to solve and then ask others how they would address it.


During these discussions, roughly lay out your vision, but ask employees how they picture the change taking place. This takes time and effort of course. But the payoff is huge."


Source:   Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\www.hbr.org).


Photo credit:  by Jill Clardy

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is never so powerful a change impetus as when the people own the story.  There are many famous quotes on this concept, yet suffice it to say large system change, whole system change, large group methods all are centered in the power of story and how it goes forward.  ~  Deb

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Face Your Tiger: Courage for Those Dreaded Conversations

Face Your Tiger:  Courage for Those Dreaded Conversations | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The great First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt once said, "You must do the thing you think you cannot do."In other words, you must face your tiger.That is the beginning of overcoming fear.

Excerpts:

Prepare yourself before entering the tiger's lair. As the saying goes "Success happens when preparation meets opportunity." So preparation is key for these conversations. Here are a few questions to consider in advance:

  • What is the issue you need to discuss with the other person(s)?
  • Why is it important to you?
  • What is the biggest obstacle in the way of having this conversation?
  • What is the cost of avoiding this conversation?
  • What would you gain by having this conversation?
  • What would it take for this conversation to go well?


So if you have been dreading and avoiding the conversations you should be having, now is the time to "do the thing you think you cannot do."

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a helpful companion post for my last Scoop minutes ago on courage.   In my own training in Crucial Confrontations, I learned that sometimes the conversation is not worth having as the issue may be about YOU, not them.  Other times, it is highly important to to "face your tiger," for your own self-worth, honoring your values and for self-efficacy - a fancy term for your belief in yourself getting the job done well.   

Judging the risk of falling on your sword is part of the job.  Hopefully THAT is not a scenario in your organization.  If it is, may your exit plan be a strong one.    ~  Deb

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