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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

   


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 8:31 AM

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

Suggested by Pi Wen Looi, PhD.
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Establishing a New Normal, A Case Study via ASTD

Establishing a New Normal, A Case Study via ASTD | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Recently, the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) changed its name.  Reactions to the name change ranged from excitementcynical, to disappointment....One thing is clear. For a major change like this—an identity change, no less—the change process could have been handled better.

______________________
    
 The last thing you want to happen during a transition is for employees to start a rumor mill.
______________________


Lessons learned include:

2. Get employees involved early in the change process. People who lead the change have more information and time to process the information than the majority of the organization. ....You can provide a communication channel, such as an employee survey or focus groups, to test your change concept and for your employees to provide feedback.


3. Communicate frequently. It usually takes a village and a lot of time to transition from the current state to the future state.   ...Err on the side of over-communicating because people crave accurate and timely information during a transition. The last thing you want to happen during a transition is for employees to start a rumor mill.


4. Acknowledge the old, celebrate the past, and welcome the new.

It’s important to acknowledge how past successes have led the company to its current state. You can build on the foundation of past success, acknowledge employees’ contributions, and launch for the future.


5. Establish the new normal. ...what new behaviors [are needed now?]  Establish new norms, language, and align your existing operational processes to support the new direction....companies that are growing too fast without establishing the needed infrastructure and operational processes create a lot of chaos for employees - employee engagement scores decline.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

                          

                    

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

What is the New Normal?  It's just part of the steps & lessons learned from this retrospective case study of a name change in a large association.  ~  Deb

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Good Resistance, Bad Resistance: How can you tell?

Good Resistance, Bad Resistance:  How can you tell? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

When you think of an employee who is resistant to change, what comes to mind?  ....research on constructive resistance is on the rise.


Positive deviance is the scholarly term for constructive resistance.  The technical term is "constructive deviance," however deviance is so associated to criminal activity, I wish they had picked a different term (Warren, 2004).  They mean deviation from the norm, but the way.

Conflict is probably the easiest type of constructive resistance to tackle in this post.  Groupthink theory (Janis, 1972) posits that a LACK of conflict is bad for a project's performance.


See more at:   http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/06/good-resistance-bad-resistance.html#sthash.MsRgKept.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One of Ron's recent post on understanding the true nature of resistance.  ~  Deb

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Building Commitment During an ERP Rollout

In this e-book, Luc Galoppin and Daryl Conner bring together their insights on commitment and social architecture. Learn how the eight stages of commitment apply to an ERP rollout and why it is crucial to carefully plan the moments-of-truth.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Daryl Conner's commitment curve is handily illustrated with sketch designs notes, thanks to Luc and Daryl's ebook style Slideshare.  It's a useful reference for any change project, including but not limited to an ERP rollout.  ~  Deb

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Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Change leader competencies that also include mindsets. All can be developed."


This is a handy list worth reviewing from colleague Gail Severini. There's more to come, including a top-ten competencies for change agents those who are the focus of the change.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


Change Leaders' Competencies include:


1.  Determination and discipline - The leader …“Has a profound resolve toward the specific shifts the organization has identified as essential for its future success,...” And, has the personal discipline to ...ake difficult and challenging actions.


2.  Self-Knowledge and mindfulness - ...calm in the midst of high-stress, dynamic change. The ability to concentrate and be attentive to other people and concepts...are intricately connected.


6.  Integrative thinking - Once we accept that transformational change presents enormous ambiguity it becomes obvious that the ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”.


7.  Culture awareness - An understanding of the organization’s current and desired cultures [and] plans for making the shift.


10.  Make meaning - Making the change relevant to every resource who has to make the transition --the  unusual capability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, to ...help them ...navigate their way through it. 


Read the full post here.

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Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It's a science AND an art; people are involved.  Treat change management as being of equal importance as the technical aspects of implementation.

   

Yes, I've seen many of these mistakes over the years.  Most recently: Modeling someone else's culture as a change blueprint, being penny-wise and pound-foolish about budgeting for change, staying inside the bubble of your own viewpoint (item#1 below.)  See if you agree with this list.

   

_____________________________

   

5% or 15%?  Underfunding!  "Gartner recommends ...allocat[ing] an average of 15% ...to ...change management, inclusive of training ...more, if ...the corporate culture is more change-averse." 

_____________________________

   

Excerpted:

  

...the most common mistakes:

   

1) Not Seeking Outside Expertise
Rarely do companies have deep change management expertise, though some [seek] to build this capability inhouse. Typically companies expect [their own people] to foster stability, eliminate process deviation, and minimize risk ...—and are rewarded for doing so. Expecting these same people to introduce change and “rock the boat” is ...counter to the normal, expected behaviors.

   

2) Short-Cutting the Change Process
... leaders disband the change management effort prematurely, cease to communicate, and stop engaging stakeholders too soon.  ...The greater the ...change ...the longer the ...change “sustainability” phase that is required.   


3) Executive Delegating Change Leadership Responsibility
....executive sponsors ...not seen or heard from again; sponsors ...uninformed of their initiative’s progress and unsure how to help; and sponsors not clear about what priority an initiative had among multiple business objectives.


4) Under-Funding the Change Management Effort
A 2011 Gartner survey found that companies under-invest in organizational change management. Companies allocate, on average, only 5% of the overall system implementation budget to the change management effort. Gartner recommends that companies allocate an average of 15% of the program budget to organizational change management, inclusive of training — but more, if changes are significant or the corporate culture is more change-averse.


5) Not Integrating Change Management with Program Management
...this can be a separate plan, with the critical milestones listed on the master program or project plan. ...program success is greatly diminished when the change management activities are “bolted on” ....

   

Read the full article here.    http://www.leadersbeacon.com/most-common-change-management-mistakes-companies-make/


For more Deep Change expertise, see our panel here:  http://www.scoop.it/t/change-leadership-vision/p/1549448247/the-trusted-advisors-with-open-space-event-was-a-hit-in-las-vegas    (I'm in orange, facilitating the Open Space portion.)



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Strategic Agility? FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous

Strategic Agility?  FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world:  Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"If you stand still, you’ll fall behind in today’s VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. Movement alone, however, doesn’t guarantee success." ~ Liz Guthridge


Great post by Liz!  On her blog, I commented that Liz speaks to a practical tool for VUCA preparedness so well, especially in cultivating a state of strategic agility, a big interest of mine this past year in assisting clients.


Excerpts:

.

By committing to FLIP (focus, listen, involve and personalize), you’re leading from wherever you are. And you’re serving as a role model to encourage others to be active, not passive, about your responsibilities.

.

With #3, INVOLVE, Liz talks about smart-mob organizing, bringing together groups of people for a common business challenge or social change.  This can easily include social media or other technology.

  • Liz is conducting a Best Practice Institute webinar on Change Through Crowdsourcing: How to Use Peer-by-Peer Practices to Transform Organizations on June 19 at 2 pm

.

With smart mobs, you can collaborate and cooperate in new, clever ways faster and more effective than ever before.

.

Rather than be content living with uncertainty and ambiguity in a VUCA world, you’re switching them around. You’re showing “agility” instead of “ambiguity” by seeking “understanding” instead of floundering in uncertainty.


Full post here.

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5 Factors and Tools to Predict Change Success, AKA Adoption of Your Business Initiative – VinJones

5 Factors and Tools to Predict Change Success, AKA Adoption of Your Business Initiative – VinJones | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on our main website: CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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How Change Courageous Are You? The “Serving Two Masters” Trap

How Change Courageous Are You?  The “Serving Two Masters” Trap | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

...an overlooked statistic tells quite a story.  If only 14% believe that “everyone” is responsible for change success, how can the whole system change? Answer … it doesn’t.


...Change Agent Moment of Truth

In theory, internal consultants are neutral. In reality, many HR executives feel threatened by internal OD consultants to the point that I’ve witnessed OD consultants fired for their successes.

     

The dilemma is all about the question, “who do you serve?”

Stop the insanity of blaming the change recipients & start holding up the mirror for you, whether you are a change agent or change leader.

   

If you level the playing field, give a voice to the silent majority, and really confront change leaders and fellow change agents with their contributions to the status quo, you just might be part of the 20% instead of the 80%.

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

    

    

    

       
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Regardless of the mixed statistics about how many change initiatives fail, Ron Koller's key point about only 14% believing change is everyone's role is quite telling.   
   
Do you agree with the change roles and the in/out "everyone" is responsible for change comparisons?  

   

Moreover, in my conversation with Ron Koller recently about courage and the OD / Change Agent, have you found ways to be successful when you "level the playing field, give a voice to the silent majority, and really confront change leaders and fellow change agents with their contributions to the status quo?"

   
~ Deb

 

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Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change

Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is a useful collection of webinars, handouts and materials from thought leaders via Nexus 4 Change.  Examples:

  • Whole System Transformation, A Fireside Chat with Harrison Owen (Open Space Technology), 
  • Future Search 
  • and more.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I attended the insightful and affirming webinar with Harrison Owen.   There is much to mine here.  Great resource!  ~  Deb

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Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum

Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it



Dr. Coetsee reasons that a person begins with apathy, a state that is neither for or against the change.   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Ron highlights Dr. Coetsee's support of Judson's continuum concept with a more organic configuration as a flow model.

Stay tuned for more news of Ron's additional work on the topic of resistance and choice in this flow model, including overcommitment.  

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:42 PM
@Luca, thanks for your support and sharing. :-)
Luca Appia's comment, January 25, 2013 9:08 PM
@Deb, thank you too for this articles :-)
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3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class: Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian?

3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class:  Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"China’s Lenovo is now the second-largest PC maker in the world and hopes to grab the top spot from Hewlett-Packard soon."


Read on for goood competitive change  insights here on how 2nd and 3rd tier companies in China and India are now vying for global branding recognition, and why they've got a good shot at making it happen.  


Excerpts:


____________________________________

Non-branded companies earn margins of 3-8% and are at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. Branded firms enjoy fatter margins of 15% or more.

____________________________________


Chinese and Indian companies are no longer content to do the grunt work for Western firms, for two simple reasons:

  

  • non-branded companies typically earn gross margins of 3-8% and are constantly at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. 
   
  • Branded firms enjoy fatter margins (15% or more) and more loyal customers.


Yet becoming a global brand is exceedingly hard. ...GfK, a consumer-research company, found that only one-third of Americans were willing even to consider buying an Indian or Chinese car.


...How can others make the leap? “The New Emerging-Market Multinationals”, a book by Amitava Chattopadhyay, of INSEAD, and Rajeev Batra, of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, offers some clues.



____________________________________

   

...global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz.

____________________________________


The article illustrates three basics:

  

  • First, they must exploit their two basic advantages—economies of scale and local knowledge—to expand into new markets,
    
  • Some firms use their understanding of local markets to expand globally,
  
  • Others move swiftly to exploit opportunities.

   

The research in the book offers three more ingredients to these basics:

   

1.  The first is focus: they should define a market segment in which they have a chance of becoming world-class.

   
  • Natura Cosméticos, a Brazilian cosmetics-maker, zeroed in on the market for “natural” cosmetics with ingredients extracted from the rainforest.
    
  • Lenovo focused on computers for corporate clients before expanding into the consumer market. 
   

2.  The second is innovation: global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz. 

  • HTC produces 15-20 new mobile-phone handsets a year.
   
  • Natura releases a new product every three working days. 
   
3.  The third ingredient is old-fashioned brand-building: Questions to decide:  
   
  
  • Use the company’s name (as Toyota does) or another name (as Procter & Gamble does - Gillette razors to Pampers diapers)?
     
  • How to market effectively in multiple countries without budget-busting? Lenovo has hired an expensive American marketing firm, but saves money by doing most of its advertising work in Bangalore.


  

Read the full article here.


NOTE: Do you need perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing?


You can contact Deb Nystrom here to find out more, without obligation.

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10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.


________________________________

    

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

    

________________________________


I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


"General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

[to holism],says that each variable in any system

interacts with the other variables

so thoroughly that cause and effect

cannot be separated.


A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

Relationship is everything."    

- Marilyn Ferguson,  

The Aquarian Conspiracy



A sample from her blog post:


She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:


  • Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.
  
  • DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.
   
   
  • Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.
   
  • Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.


She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!



Read the full post here.

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Change Community: Writing an Online Community Plan - How To

Change Community:  Writing an Online Community Plan - How To | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

If you plan on building an online community you must have a plan - not a strategy, but a community plan. The list below will help you develop your plan and improve the growth and experience of your community. 

   

The plan is relevant for  social communities, blogging, email marketing and just about anywhere else online.

    

Recommendation: Create an online community plan and then segment each category with their own responsibilities


DN:  I suggest a thorough answer to this question before the steps below:  What is the purpose of being in the community?  (Short & long term.)

  

Elements:

  

1.  Who runs the community.   A leader. Choose one person (responsibility, control, standards, expectations) to manage the online community.  

  

2.  Build community persona.  Who you are targeting to join?  Include demographics, habits and attitudes, vehicle types they drive, education levels, average annual income, marital status, number of kids, etc. 

  

3. Early focus.   Focus on 20-50 people that fall into your persona descriptions, to encourage early joining.

  

4.  Why should they join?  Be prepared to explain why these people should join:

  • Value proposition?  
  • Increase their stature in the off-line community?  
  • Increased visibility or fame?  

  

5. Retaining new members.  What is your plan to get them engaged and to retain them?  Defined your process to get new members engaged immediately or they will lose interest.  Assign a dedicated member to mentor each new member that joins the community for about 3 weeks.  Provide the opportunity to engage, ask questions, recommendations.

  

6.  Community happenings.  Short-term and long-term - activities

  

7.  How will you grow the community?  Exclusive?  Grow a massive community?  Define your clear vision of how to or not to promote the community for growth.

  

8.  Platform selection.  Explain your choice via the  type of community you are building - note  forums, mailing lists, newsgroups, etc.

  

9. Content creation.  Create a content calendar, plan for content creation at least 4-6 weeks out when you launch.  Stay at least 30 days ahead of publishing. Assign responsibilities for management, creation, editing, and publishing of the content for the community.

  

10.  Value.   [DN:  See purpose & vision, to ensure this is delivered!]

  

Sourcehttp://bit.ly/M8xgMu

  

Resources

   

Plan for Content Creation --  http://bit.ly/Pil9Sa

The Social Media TuneUp -- http://bit.ly/KXr88R


Via maxOz
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March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @ ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012

March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @  ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012 | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


As a curator of CMRsite.com for which this is the curation stream on ScoopIt as well as Change Leadership Watch, I'm pleased to be on a unique panel to share diverse perspectives on the role of the Trusted Advisor in today's turbulent world.  


We'll also be trying something new at global conference of this nature, using Open Space to explore the nature of collaborative learning within a session format.


Note the approaching conference deadline of March 15, 2012.


Here's a few excerpts from our program as well as from Liz Guthridge, who is facilitating our panel and organized this conference event:


What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


My colleague, Liz Guthridge, has written a helpful post about the Trusted Advisor role in supporting the work of leaders, outlining what we'll be covering in our session at ACMP Las Vegas. An excerpt:


[Liz] re-read quite a few of David Maister’s tips, primarily from his book, The Trusted Advisor...[a] 2000 classic. ...Some favorite things:


  • “I am not the center of the universe.”
  • “A point of view doesn’t commit you for life.”
  • “Reach out to notice, and acknowledge, something that has been held back in or about the other person.”
  • “Who am I serving by my present approach?”
  • “Assigning blame will trap me; taking responsibility will empower me.”
.
There's more, including biographies of who is presenting on the panel, photos, including yours truly, and links to register for the conference.
.
Do comment if you plan to attend.  It would be great to see you there!
~  Deb
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