Change Management Resources
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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,
but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:


If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Harry Cannon's curator insight, August 1, 2013 10:04 AM

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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What is change management? (Mount Rushmore version) : Change Management Success

What is change management? (Mount Rushmore version) : Change Management Success | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The Mount Rushmore of Change Management
- the big four:  John Kotter, Daryl Conner, Linda Ackerman Anderson & Jeff Hiatt

From Daryl Conner, a two-part definition including:

  • Its focus in not on "what" is driving change (technology, reorganization plans, mergers/acquisitions, globalization, etc.),
  •  but on "how" to orchestrate the human infrastructure that surrounds key projects to that people are better prepared to absorb the implications affecting them. 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a clever way to make a point about the origins of Change Management, definitions and to set the context for where it has ended up today.  ~  Deb

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Oversimplifying Change Management : A Historical View and Current Perspective

Oversimplifying Change Management :  A Historical View and Current Perspective | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Leaders, change practitioners and researchers often view organizational change through a dual lens: people either support or resist the change. This limited view of change management assures failure during the initial planning process.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is change really either / or - binary at the individual level?  Or does a full historical and practice perspective on change better fit into this perspective where change management is not a dichotomy?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 21, 2013 11:29 AM
Another view of Polarity Management is here: http://www.people-results.com/polarities-problem-solving-its-and-or-thinking/#.UP1rrqVfWO9 >> Polarity Partnerships spoke at the National OD Network conference and defined Polarities as “interdependent pairs that support a common purpose and one another. They are energy systems in which we live and work.”
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Change and Endings: Letting Go and Acceptance before New Beginnings

Change and Endings: Letting Go and Acceptance before New Beginnings | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Successful transition through endings is a necessary skill these days. A William Bridges classic gives insights into helping endings succeed." 


This is one of my own posts on a popular summary of Bridges' work on the differences between change and transition:


  • How to help endings be successful
  • Access to a downloadable Bridges model article
  • Get the strategies list for successful endings


Excerpts:


Sometimes an ending is a major, transformative revelation for a business, such as when CEO Darwin Smith exclaimed they needed to shut down the paper mills leading the shift to a new way of doing business.  


_______________________

"It isn't the changes that do you in, it's the transitions.


...Change is external, transition is internal."  


William Bridges


_______________________


Successful endings:

   

   
  • Allow you to enter the Neutral Zone (like the Black Forest) of transitions and change, according to William Bridges
   
Read the full article here.  The downloadable model is on Deb's TOOLS page here.
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 24, 2012 1:02 PM
Thanks for sharing this Harry. :-)
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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

______________________________

   

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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4 Phases to Building Organizational Synergy, Change Process | Daryl Conner & Change Thinking

4 Phases to Building Organizational Synergy, Change Process | Daryl Conner & Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Daryl's series focuses on synergy in organizations:


Before people can create and maintain synergistic relationships, they must be willing, and they must have the ability to engage with each other, understand, integrate learning, and implement what they learn.



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Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation

Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How about a step beyond the change agents and focusing on the people who matter most, frontline employees and managers, in working through change transition?


Read about the study that provides a conceptual bridge from change readiness (pre-change) to change implementation (post-change).


Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


       

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More helpful scholarly work from Ron Koller on making it through the change process, from readiness to and THROUGH implementation. - Deb

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Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum

Apathy Chooses a Flow through Resistance in Change, Not a Continuum | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it



Dr. Coetsee reasons that a person begins with apathy, a state that is neither for or against the change.   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Ron highlights Dr. Coetsee's support of Judson's continuum concept with a more organic configuration as a flow model.

Stay tuned for more news of Ron's additional work on the topic of resistance and choice in this flow model, including overcommitment.  

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:42 PM
@Luca, thanks for your support and sharing. :-)
Luca Appia's comment, January 25, 2013 9:08 PM
@Deb, thank you too for this articles :-)
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Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser

Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The classics of change management are here, featuring Lewin, as well as Agile project management and risks.

   

Excerpts:

  

Lewin’s change management model depicts three phases that apply to any change.

  

  1. Unfreeze, which means removing the constraints and generate the will to change. 
  2. The change itself, where people reposition themselves according to the new objectives. 
  3. Refreeze, where the new situation becomes stable.


Kotter’s 8-step change model is also listed. The article highlights:
Steps 1-to-5 fit into the “unfreeze” phase, steps 6 and 7 correspond to the “change” itself, and step 8 corresponds to the “refreeze” phase of Lewin’s model.


By Dr. John Kotter:

  1. Create urgency
  2. Form a coalition
  3. Create a vision for change
  4. Communicate the vision
  5. Remove obstacles
  6. Create short-term wins
  7. Build on the change
  8. Anchor the change


_______________________________


The change curve...shows that [a] main objective... is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.

_______________________________



Change management also deals with people’s stress and the temporary negative effect of change.  What helps with change stress?

   

  • Guarantee job stability for a period of time long enough for them to learn the new skills and settle in their new roles.
  • Increase tolerance to mistakes and decreased efficiency during a period of time.
  • Emphasize that this is a chance to develop new, more marketable skills.


The change curve (see Daryl Conner's work especially) pictures the negative impact of change across time.  It shows that one of the main objectives of change management is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.


_______________________________

   

Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects

_______________________________

    


Setting Up a Project to Manage Change

Many changes are carried in operational mode, which tends to be chaotic because it doesn’t explicitly address concerns such as cost management, quality management, schedule management, procurement, etc,

    

By balancing discipline and flexibility appropriately, Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects.

      

  • The most critical area is risk management.
  • In project management, risks are “known unknowns”, identified areas of uncertainty to manage. 
  • “Unknown unknowns”,  means risks not yet identified yet. 


    

The full article is here:  http://t.co/ADKBgl3v...)...

    

Companion, relevant articles by Deb are here:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Lewis is a bedrock source when looking for the origins of change management.  Adding agile project management adds perspectives on types of change as well.

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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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Demystifying social media, change in big business trends & structuring - McKinsey Quarterly

Demystifying social media, change in big business trends & structuring - McKinsey Quarterly | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"A McKinsey trio of writers call out how the vast majority of executives have no idea how to harness social media’s power, as well as how senior leaders can harness it to shape consumer decision making more predictably."


This is relevant as a change resource, as is the commentary on the article, also illuminating, including these two:  


"B2B has certainly been a slow adopter but we’ve seen a dramatic shift in just the last year...."


and


...It is no longer about how your CMO [Chief Marketing Officer] uses social media. It is about “Is your organization social-media ready?“

 

Excerpted:

 

[Social Media] is much more than ...another form of paid marketing, and it demands more too:

  • a clear framework to help CEOs and other top executives evaluate investments in it,
  • a plan for building support infrastructure, and
  • performance-management systems to help leaders smartly scale their social presence.


Companies that have these three elements in place can create critical new brand assets (such as content from customers or insights from their feedback), open up new channels for interactions (Twitter-based customer service, Facebook news feeds), and completely reposition a brand through the way its employees interact with customers or other parties.


The article includes a series of five video narrations, by David Edelman from McKinsey's Digital Marketing Strategy group.

 

Read more via: McKinseyquarterly.com  (may require free membership)  https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing/Digital_Marketing/Demystifying_social_media_2958


Via tony whittingham, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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