Change Management Resources
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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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It's Compliance! Why Change Management Fails (& it’s not Resistance) Research Findings

It's Compliance! Why Change Management Fails (& it’s not Resistance) Research Findings | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Compliance (an individual performing the minimum effort so they do not get fired) outweighs Resistance to Change by more than a 2 to 1 margin.


The full video of the presentation is here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_ZYYWWJ9RQ 


See Deb's companion ScoopIt posts via Change Leadership Watch here.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Intuitively, this will make sense to you if you've ever worked for a large organization, or even a smaller one with typical change practices.
   
This is Ron Koller's new research, presented recently at the Academy of Management meeting this fall.  Yu may resonate with what he's pointing out, often hidden in the blind spots of "tolerating" management change initiatives and practices.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:35 PM

Check out Ron Koller's research, presented recently at the Academy of Management meeting this fall.  ~  Deb

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Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation

Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How about a step beyond the change agents and focusing on the people who matter most, frontline employees and managers, in working through change transition?


Read about the study that provides a conceptual bridge from change readiness (pre-change) to change implementation (post-change).


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More helpful scholarly work from Ron Koller on making it through the change process, from readiness to and THROUGH implementation. - Deb

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Change Useful: The Cynefin Framework helps with Complexity, Complex, Chaos and Simplicity

The Cynefin (play /ˈkʌnɨvɪn/) framework is used to describe problems, situations and systems. It provides a typology of contexts that guides what sort of explanations and/or solutions may apply. Cynefin is a Welsh word, which is commonly translated into English as 'habitat' or 'place', although this fails to convey its full meaning. A more complete translation of the word would be that it conveys the sense that we all have multiple pasts of which we can only be partly aware: cultural, religious, geographic, tribal etc. The term was chosen by the Welsh scholar Dave Snowden to illustrate the evolutionary nature of complex systems, including their inherent uncertainty. The name is a reminder that all human interactions are strongly influenced and frequently determined by our experiences, both through the direct influence of personal experience, and through collective experience, such as stories or music.

The Cynefin framework draws on research into complex adaptive systems theory, cognitive science, anthropology and narrative patterns, as well as evolutionary psychology. It "explores the relationship between man, experience and context"[1] and proposes new approaches to communication, decision-making, policy-making and knowledge management in complex social environments.

The Cynefin framework was originally developed in 1999 in the context of knowledge management and organisational strategy by Dave Snowden[2] It was originally a modification of Max Boisot's I-Space[3] combined with the study of actual, as opposed to stated management practice in IBM. By 2002 it had developed to include complex adaptive systems theory and had started to become a general strategy model.[4] It was then further developed and elaborated with Cynthia Kurtz as a part of their work with the IBM Institute of Knowledge Management (IKM).[5] Kurtz had worked with Snowden as a part of an IBM special interest group on narrative from 1999 before joining the IKM in 2001)[6] Kurtz and others continued this work in Cognitive Edge formed by Snowden when he left IBM in 2005. This period included work to extend the model to Leadership with Mary E Boone which culminated in the HBR article referenced below.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Quotable, "There's nothing so practical as a good theory, " and this one in particular helps with the complexity of change.  ~  D

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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

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Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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Why Traditional Business Transformation Don't Work, & A New Co-Creative Model - Innovation Playground

Why Traditional Business Transformation Don't Work, &  A New Co-Creative Model - Innovation Playground | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Over 60% of companies out there are operating from a dated business model. 20% are operating with a mental model that had expired more than 5 years ago.

Business transformation traditionally takes the form of unfreezing to refreezing and bridging the gaps in capabilities, mindset and performance.


The transformation model featured in this blog post by Idris Mootee has a strong future orientation, uses Design Thinking principles, and features a tangible, collaborative co-creation process.


A high-level view is captured by the following formula: Successful Brand-Driven Business Transformation = P+N+C+M+I+F


P = Develop a perspective of the future(s) informed by strategic foresights (both customer and technology contexts) and deep organizational insights;


N = Develop a co-created brand narrative that inspired people re: possibilities and purpose at the core of the story;


C = Develop a compelling case for the need for change developed and shared by all executives, investors, employees and B2B business partners;


M = Map - Develop a practical means to tie innovation (roadmap) and projects to the desired future(s);


I = Design an incentive systems that are aligned to identify and encourage appropriate behaviors compatible with the desired future;


F = Develop feedback mechanism for each stage of the process to monitor progress and provide input for continuous improvement.

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Preach to Your Choir, Critical Mass in Change Depends on Follower Networks - John D. Adams

Preach to Your Choir, Critical Mass in Change Depends on Follower Networks  - John D. Adams | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Professor John D. Adams helps us understand some of the “soft” barriers to change and how to chart a path toward change by developing a critical mass of supporters for the desired change.

Change leadership is only half of the story. A movement for change requires followers, ...they rarely show up and commit to the change without considerable effort on our part.

Adams offers us some insight into three major barriers to effectively cultivating enough followers to get your change off the ground:

 

1) The auto-pilot mindset:   Adams reminds us that this is why, even when we agree that a change must be made, we often don’t follow through with a new way of doing things. 

 

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…training is not the goal. The goal is the goal.

   

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2) Bias toward training:   Of course, training is essential for change .  However, the training does not accomplish the change — it simply lays the groundwork.   …Confusing the training with the change is a common mistake.


The training is not the goal. The goal is the goal.

 

3) Absence of support for novelty management: Change automatically brings …uncertainty…anxiety…distress…surprise, unfamiliarity, uncertainty.  …Many leaders forget to support people through the emotional challenges that novelty can bring. 
 

People will need new information, a chance to learn new skills, time to develop attitudes and values that support the change, and rewards for adopting the change. Being deliberate and patient in these areas will help speed the change along.

     

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PREACH TO YOUR CHOIR. ... “...creating a critical mass of people …who will ensure that the change process becomes self-sustaining.” 

___________________


    

Perhaps the most important message Adams offers is this: PREACH TO YOUR CHOIR....it is actually “the most important mechanism for creating a critical mass of people who are solidly behind a change program and who will ensure that the change process becomes self-sustaining.”


…the easiest path is to start with those who are willing to get on board immediately. Don’t take them for granted; stay focused on them to build momentum.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

          

    
    

           

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I was not familiar with John D. Adams' work, until yesterday.  His tools for understanding stress, transition (similar to William Bridges) and change is useful and may resonate with change practitioners who like to review models that may provide a useful reminder of the basics or clarify common mistakes in change leading.
   
Besides, if there is one thing that provokes curiosity to change and OD practitioners,  it is discovering a model and/or perspective that may shed light in the dark corners of the mysteries of leading change successfully.
   
As I was offering programs in stress in the early 80s, 9-10 years later than Adams.  He started offering health and stress workplace programs and coaching in 1975.

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Transformational leaders and change: What's the Collective Purpose in the Process?

Transformational leaders and change:  What's the Collective Purpose in the Process? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Transformational leaders and change:  ...If your workers won't change, maybe you should.

Through their behavior, transformational leaders, foster change as an element of education, growth, experimentation, and, ultimately, change acceptance. This bears fruit in the minds of our employees: 

  • psychological freedom,
  • engagement in the thinking parts of the job, and
  • systematic organizational approval.


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..It's the human touches, combined with all the formal systems that build confidence." ...be positive and avoid negativity, get to know people.


________________________


Transformational leaders are intuitive experts at motivating followers to see the collective purpose of their jobs. Understanding purpose should be a sought after identifier for members of any organization, whether the boss-types comprehend it or not.


Source:   http://t.co/kyBESMLC)    


Related articles by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Rank and yank performance metrics, "human capital" jargon, cycles of reorganization, no wonder cynicism is a continuing visitor at the performance & results table.  


The psychology of modeling the change personally to build collective purpose is worth a look.  ~  Deb

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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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4 Phases to Building Organizational Synergy, Change Process | Daryl Conner & Change Thinking

4 Phases to Building Organizational Synergy, Change Process | Daryl Conner & Change Thinking | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Daryl's series focuses on synergy in organizations:


Before people can create and maintain synergistic relationships, they must be willing, and they must have the ability to engage with each other, understand, integrate learning, and implement what they learn.



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