Change Management Resources
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Top Tips For Leading Technology Change In Schools

Top Tips For Leading Technology Change In Schools | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

One challenge is understanding the actual training needs of your colleagues:


  • Some present as vaguely competent and actually have very little idea of how to use devices to support learning
  • Others...hide under a bushel a deep and valuable understanding and set of of skills. 


_____________________________
   
Some people will need ...intensive support ...you will need to make a judgement about w...what constitutes ‘enough’ progress for this term/ year


_____________________________


Unless your staff is small and stable, it’s likely that you won’t have the in-depth knowledge you need to design a training program that meets everyone’s needs. For this, a Training Needs Analysis (TNA) tool is required. An example is listed here.


It serves a number of purposes:

   

  • to identify those most in need of intensive support;
     
  • to identify those who might be able to support others, particularly in specific areas of expertise;
      
  • to help you plan large-scale training aimed at common areas of weakness/ concern;
   
  • to help you plan training targeted at smaller groups (e.g. the English department), based on a better understanding of their skills.
     

It's best administered online survey and analyzed via a spreadsheet.
Some people will need really intensive support and you will need to make a judgement about who should get your time and what constitutes ‘enough’ progress for this term/ year.

Some teachers will resist the change, whatever you do to support them. This is something that many 1-to-1 leaders struggle with, pouring time and energy into trying to shift the most stubborn of refuseniks.

Our advice? Put your effort where it is likely to have an outcome and ‘ignore the haters’. If you can create momentum with 75% of staff, they may carry the rest with them.  ...Teach to the top end.

Top tips:

  1. Full support of Leadership team with regular communication;
  2. A defined Director of Technology role for implementation;
  3. Regular training sessions with support available by email, in lessons and 1-to-1;
  4. Model good practice and offer lesson observations;
  5. Implement a student Digital Leader programme;
  6. Identify a staff technology champion in every department;
  7. Remember that use of the technology is always about learning not the device;
  8. Find quick wins that make the change worthwhile for staff;
  9. Focus your time on the positives.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These are great tips, also following the "early adopters, early majority" model of how change happens in learning organizations.  ~  Deb

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Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results

Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions."


Diversity and T shaped people


Excerpted, Paraphrased:


Working on innovation requires experience of team members and of their leadership mainly when where the combination of various disciplines is an unquestionable necessity such in the area of health.
 

Take:

  

  • People with different backgrounds and experiences who are also experts in a specific area?
   
  • To collaborate ...gather forces in two dimensions:


Plot out:


  • The vertical axis, each team member is able to answer questions specific of a discipline or area of work.
    
  • The horizontal axis ~ the ability to generate empathy and move through a common language. 

   
This is translated into opening, in curiosity, optimism, a tendency to learn by doing, and for experimentation => Those are “T” shaped people. 

  
Those are able to show a desired future, and build a path for its accomplishment.

   

...Management consultants long ago realized that only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions.

   

McKinsey and Company came up with the idea of hiring what they termed ‘T-shaped’ people.


People with deep analytical skills (the vertical stroke of the T) but also broad empathy toward those other skills and disciplines encountered in business (the horizontal stroke of the T).


These highly adaptable, rapid learners turned out to be ideal management consultants.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The "T” shaped = "highly adaptable, rapid learners" which sounds like aspects of the characteristics of agile learning to me, an asset to change facilitators & project leaders.  ~  Deb


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Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks

Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
You’ve probably experienced it, that uncomfortable feeling of letting go of something tried and formerly true without knowing what is coming next. Welcome to the Neutral Zone, coined by chang...


For now, consider that the middle state of letting go to enter the Neutral Zoneincludes building improved learning agility, a developmental process as we:


1) UnLearnlet go and prepare to accept something new,

2) Adapt, pilot and test new thinking and behaviors, and

3) Demonstrate New Learning (accept and refine new behaviors.)


A great metaphor for developing agility in learning can be found in rediscovering, and perhaps fully clarifying former misunderstanding of the classic change management research of Kurt Lewin. With credit to researcher Ron Koller, Lewin’s more nuanced, elegant original change work is diagrammed below.  His work has been oversimplified over the years as simply:  


1) Unfreeze,

2) Moving (Change), and

3) Refreeze2 (into the new state. )


See the full diagram of Lewin's original interrupted time series design in the full post here as well as what is key from Lewin and other change research.


Photo credit:   VinothChandar

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts in which I have the delight of uncovering a deeper, clearer understanding of the original change work of Kurt Lewin, as well as offering a Learning Agility perspective connected to current stories, Bob Johansen's VUCA perspective and Bridge's classic transitions work (a two-parter.)  


Thanks for stopping by!  ~  Deb

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The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices

The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Don’t train leaders, coach them, mentor them, disciple them, and develop them, but please don’t attempt to train them. " 

  

_____________

  
Training is transactional – Development is transformational."

_________________

  

Excerpts:  

  

A 20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development:

     

1. Training blends to a norm – Development occurs beyond the norm.

  

2. Training focuses on technique/content/curriculum – Development focuses on people.

  

4. Training focuses on the present – Development focuses on the future.

  

6. Training is transactional – Development is transformational.

  

More here:  'http://t.co/vcn5rSxa


More about leaders and being strategically & learning agile is here:




Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How does real leadership development happen?  Through development.  The authors  20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development.  Training is convenient and can reach many people, but only development make the grade in agiiity for adapting to change.


This article also reminds me of the limitations of ADDIE, a training design approach still used in many companies. By the time leadership training gets there (after design), there isn't there anymore.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, May 22, 2013 11:58 AM
Wow, did this hit a nerve. Great!
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Tools Review ~ And Change: Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Tools Review ~ And Change:  Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As this book fits measurement and planning, it should also be a great resource for anyone working through change.  Not doing may be smarter than doing when it comes to using certain approaches and tools.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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6 People You Need in Your Corner For a Great Team for Change - Forbes

6 People You Need in Your Corner For a Great Team for Change - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Nothing incredible is accomplished alone. You need others to help you, and you need to help others.

  

With the right team, you can form a web of connections to make the seemingly impossible practically inevitable."

  

Her post on leadership team roles includes the roles of the:

   

  • Instigator, (pictured)
  • Doubter,  (Awareness, Problems, "The first step to a solid strategy)
  • Example,  (Been there, done that, Knowledge)

    

as well as the:

  • Cheerleader,
  • Taskmaster, and the
  • Connector.
  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

For any change project, when using an advisory, transition and/or implementation team, who's on it and their ability to shift perspectives & deal with complexity makes all the difference. 


Diverse strengths in team members has been central to what I've seen in project implementation success in over 20 years of facilitation work.


For team growth, I suggest the MCG > Membership, Control & Goal series > which includes a post on Belbin (TM) team roles:


   
   

 

~ Deb


PS:  In my @Agile_Change twitter stream today, "I'll take a great team over a great individual anyday - in sports and in business. #leadership" from @DarrenHudach.    Oh yeah.


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Classic to New: Learning Agility is Change Mastery

Classic to New:  Learning Agility is Change Mastery | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
“Learning Agility, which has four dimensions—Mental Agility, People Agility, Results Agility and Change Agility—is a key to unlocking our change proficiency.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In reading through the change research of a colleague, this approach resonates, especially cultivating the ability to be a combination of a data nerd (listener), synthesizer, developer of self & others and master communicator.  These relate well to change proficiencies touted by this author.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:43 PM
@Paul, thanks for the share.
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7 Compelling Arguments for Learning & Change Success: A Whopping 47% of Influence is Peer Group

7 Compelling Arguments for Learning & Change Success:  A Whopping 47% of Influence is Peer Group | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"It becomes cool to participate."  Peer learning is on the rise!   This has implications for change success including events like Open Space.


Here's several attributes that connect with social & peer learning from a helpful post by Donald Clark that I'm reposting within the context of change management resources.


Peer learning has:

 

1. Powerful theoretical underpinning

  • Donald references Judith Harris’s "The Nurture Assumption," for which she received the George Miller Medal in psychology. 
  • He describes Ms. Harris' work on the psychology of learning as "brilliant (and shocking)"
  • In a deep look at the data she found something surprising: that 50% was genetic, just a few per cent parents and a whopping 47% peer group.

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2. Massively scalable:  Peer learning may actually be better with large classes.  That may also be transferable to Open Space and other community events like UnConferences and UnConventions (Pinterest board & blog post link.)  



3. Learning by teaching is probably the most powerful way to learn.
Peer learning involves high-order, deep-processing activity.  The teacher may actually gain more than the learner.


His post also covers 6 more points including how peer learning:

  • encourages critical thinking, 
  • has group bonding as a side effect
  • dramatic decreases drop-out rates (DN: read, engagement)
  • increases attainment of goals, ex: "It becomes cool to participate."
  • You don’t actually need any tools to get started.  
.
I'll find out more about scale & Donald's other points as we engage in an Open Space peer learning event focused on the Trusted Advisor role during the ACMP 2o12 change conference in Vegas in April. (Deadline March 15th, 20o12)

.

Read Donald Clark's full article here.

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