Change Management Resources
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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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A Key to Successful Change are Inspired Middle Managers | Harvard Biz

A Key to Successful Change are Inspired Middle Managers  | Harvard Biz | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Research shows manager traits that create success."

     

Nurse Michelle delaCalle faced a room full of people who were discouraged by the organization’s earlier attempts at change. She stood and shared a story of her own about how making people wait for hours in the emergency department seemed like a violation of her caregiving role. Her story seemed to move people. “I could feel my own intensity,” she said, and when she was done speaking, she could tell that people finally understood the need to change.
     

Change efforts often crumble into excruciatingly dull meetings and PowerPoint presentations. This hospital’s effort won’t, I believe, because of people like delaCalle. A mid-level manager in this 5,000-employee hospital, she is leading a 70-member group on patient flow as part of a larger organizational effort. Her ability to lead and inspire — to become a change leader from her position as a mid-level manager — is helping her team produce results.


For instance,

  • flow is improving:  patients are moving from the emergency department to beds faster
  • the number of patients discharged before 11:30 a.m. doubled from 20% to 40% between July and December 2013, and has stayed at that level since.
        

I studied large-scale change and innovation efforts in 56 randomly selected companies in the high-tech, retail, pharmaceutical, banking, automotive, insurance, energy, non-profit, and health care industries.

  • My research found that the majority of the efforts failed. 
  • A hallmark of the successful 32% was the involvement of mid-level managers two or more levels below the CEO. 
  • In those cases, mid-level managers weren’t merely managing incremental change; they were leading it by working levers of power up, across and down in their organizations.
        
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There can be change leaders at every level as well.  This example helps illustrate the wisdom of whole system change, where all levels of leaders have the opportunity to share the business case for change throughs stories, as well as lead change and the organization forward.  ~ Deb

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Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:54 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Smart Risk, Without HandCuffs to Free Your Innovation Culture

Smart Risk, Without HandCuffs to Free Your Innovation Culture | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
To foster an environment of smart risk-taking, leaders should use guardrails, not handcuffs.


Examples from the list of 7 strategies for defining guardrails:
   

1. Define smart vs. stupid risks. Every leader’s level of risk tolerance varies, but some amount of risk is essential to innovation. 


3. Encourage experimentation. ...give the go-ahead for “managed experimentation” ...resource boundaries...and have the small team that’s in charge share the results of the experimentation phase with a larger team upon completion.

7. Celebrate smart risk-taking. The Tata Group, a global conglomerate, hosts an annual “Dare to Try” awards, which celebrates the idea that failures often lead to groundbreaking innovations. This type of public acknowledgement that every big bet won’t pay off fuels a spirit of smart risk-taking among its employees.


Within your own organization, you can use the company’s intranet, e-letters, and Twitter account to showcase individuals who take smart risks. By identifying them, you publicly reward the person/team and provide a company-wide reference point for acceptable risk-taking. 


Related posts & tools by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful pointers & examples from the Booz&Co. bloggers on how to define the guardrails vs. manager bottlenecks and handcuffs.  To see a future without managers at all, check out:   

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

~  D

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, January 7, 2014 3:38 AM

A very good paper on how to encourage "adequate" risk taking in an organization

Un très bon billet sur les moyens d'encourager la prise de risque "pertinents" au sein d'une collectivité

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Tools Review ~ And Change: Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Tools Review ~ And Change:  Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As this book fits measurement and planning, it should also be a great resource for anyone working through change.  Not doing may be smarter than doing when it comes to using certain approaches and tools.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes

Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Embracing change requires you yourself to experience the changes you’re asking your organization to undergo."


Our client is now desperately hoping his division’s leaders will embrace change, maybe even a Blue Ocean Strategy. They’ve reached a dangerous tipping point that could risk the future of their business.


____________________

To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first.
____________________ 


...if you truly want to see, feel and think in new ways, you have to fight your brain’s desire to stay put.


To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first. You need to recognize that new ideas come from trying new solutions in your own head and changing your brain’s focus. Then you can rollout the rest of the plan to your company.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Any Blue Ocean change practitioners out there who wish to comment on their client experience of "do it yourself first?"  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, April 10, 2013 8:04 AM

In 2009, Steve McKee published “When Growth Stalls” in which he notes that 41.2% of nearly 5,700 companies he studied stalled in the previous decade. The number of reasons why are staggering, namely: a failure to focus, no competitive point of difference, and weak brand images and identities, to name just a few.

Given this reality, we can turn to science to explain why businesses stagnate. Growing research from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences reveal that change really is difficult for humans. Resistance comes from three forces:

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Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work

Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Karl Marx created very sophisticated theories of labor value already in 19th century. His view was that capitalistic system will lead to alienation of work. Of course his writings reflected his time..." 

____________________

...Specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen.

____________________


Excerpts from the post:  


As the company grows and more people are joining in the cooperative processes of product-making, only option to grow is the work division, specialization.




This is needed because of two things: 

  • first of all there are new skills that are needed, 
  • secondly people need to have time to grow their expertise on these matters. 
[It is] specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen. There will be different functions like marketing, R & D, logistics > inside these functions there are further divisions...

The diagram on this post is of how a software organization might look like from the point of view of alienation.

____________________

Alienation means less dependence to the actual results of the work and more dependence on the abstract knowledge.

____________________

Click the post title to read the full post.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 3:41 PM

"It is curious how often you humans manage to obtain that which you do not want."    ~ Spock in 'Errand of Mercy'


Cultural factors and practices, including possible Organization Development (OD) activities like Open Space and Whole Scale Change conferences may help organizations regain creativity and connection to vision and meaning **WITH** metrics. Some companies can do it and hold on to the alignment. 

Many have it for awhile, then lose it. SouthWest Airlines, for example, has been touted recently as perhaps losing sight of what has made them so unique and resilient in a VERY tough industry.
 

Steelcase, a 100+ year company, continues to reinvent and renew itself. Building something tangible and taking pride in it is probably a major factor, no matter what your role is in the company. Working in the finance industry, being distanced through numbers in ways more than in a typical company, perhaps not so much, being able to grab ahold of the meaning and hold on.   ~ Deb

PS:  I've listed this post on Change Management Resources as well.

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There’s No Such Thing as Leadership? Using Pull, Influence and Open Space vs. Power

There’s No Such Thing as Leadership?  Using Pull, Influence and Open Space  vs. Power | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How many times has the question been asked, “What is management vs. what is leadership?”  Peter Drucker gets clear, "There's no such thing as leadership."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my blog post on Peter Drucker's surprising admission, Open Space leadership events, social media and Agility.  Just a few things to think about.  ~  Deb

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The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices

The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Don’t train leaders, coach them, mentor them, disciple them, and develop them, but please don’t attempt to train them. " 

  

_____________

  
Training is transactional – Development is transformational."

_________________

  

Excerpts:  

  

A 20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development:

     

1. Training blends to a norm – Development occurs beyond the norm.

  

2. Training focuses on technique/content/curriculum – Development focuses on people.

  

4. Training focuses on the present – Development focuses on the future.

  

6. Training is transactional – Development is transformational.

  

More here:  'http://t.co/vcn5rSxa


More about leaders and being strategically & learning agile is here:




Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How does real leadership development happen?  Through development.  The authors  20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development.  Training is convenient and can reach many people, but only development make the grade in agiiity for adapting to change.


This article also reminds me of the limitations of ADDIE, a training design approach still used in many companies. By the time leadership training gets there (after design), there isn't there anymore.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, May 22, 2013 11:58 AM
Wow, did this hit a nerve. Great!
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Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world

Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Today's global business environment requires bold new programs to drive high performance along three dimensions: change management, leadership, and culture.

  

This may why Peter Drucker say that there is no such thing as leadership.  

  

Culture trumps leadership and change, which is why multi-polar world  (as well as VUCA world, Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambigious in another post) caught my eye.

  

Excerpts:

  

Managers face major operational challenges in a global environment....

  

Communications and business processes must take place through virtual structures—teleconferences, e-mails, videoconferencing, electronic workflows...

____________________________

  

Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally.

____________________________

   

...new ways of working must be explicitly detailed and incorporated into management processes and structures, and in the ways work is moved around, checked and handed off (see "A bold new look for global sourcing,” Outlook, September 2007).

  

From a legal perspective, a crazy quilt of regulatory guidelines must be attended to as well.

  

....Some countries, for example, have restrictions on where an individual’s supervisor must reside. That can be a deal breaker for a company looking to have a team in one country reporting to a manager in another.

  

...Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally. Companies that still rely only on local efforts or, on the other hand, try to force change only from the center, are being outperformed.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kate Crisp
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Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed: MSN Money & HBR

Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed:  MSN Money & HBR | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Let employees tell their stories. ~ The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer."


This reminds me "slow is fast," from Theory U, popularized by Otto Scharmer.  This thinking is not new to change strategy, but it can be difficult to those used to cascade implementations. 

The power of story is very real when combined with honest questions, that is, if you ask the question, you are truely open to hearing and responding fully to the answers. ~ Deb


_______________________


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows.   

_______________________


Excerpts:   


"Conventional approaches to change management urge leaders to set a vision and cascade it down the organization.


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows. The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer.


Instead of dictating how the organization will evolve, take a high-involvement approach. Describe the problem you are trying to solve and then ask others how they would address it.


During these discussions, roughly lay out your vision, but ask employees how they picture the change taking place. This takes time and effort of course. But the payoff is huge."


Source:   Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\www.hbr.org).


Photo credit:  by Jill Clardy

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is never so powerful a change impetus as when the people own the story.  There are many famous quotes on this concept, yet suffice it to say large system change, whole system change, large group methods all are centered in the power of story and how it goes forward.  ~  Deb

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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

______________________________

   

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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Sales is also about Change Management & Change Leading

Sales is also about Change Management & Change Leading | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The buyer who was 100 percent satisfied last month may have a whole new perspective this month. Here's what to do to stay on top of these changes & keep customers satisfied."

I'm always looking for new perspectives on managing & helping leaders, at all levels, with change. Sales is about staying flexible in realizing your client / customer needs may not stay the same. Some will, some won't. ~ Deb

______________________________


...you’re well positioned to learn about any changes long before your competitors get wind of them – if you make a point of asking.

______________________________


Excerpts:

Change could leave you vulnerable. The buyer who was 100 percent satisfied last month might have a whole new perspective this month – not because of anything you did, but because something about his or her situation changed.

Fortunately, you’re well positioned to learn about any changes long before your competitors get wind of them – if you make a point of asking.


How long has it been since you’ve asked these questions about your accounts?

  • How is your customer’s business different than it was a year ago? 
  • How will it be different a year from now? 
  • Do your products and services deliver at least as much value as before?
  • Is my customer’s business expanding? 
  • Are their needs changing as a result? 
  • Are your solutions scalable – and does the customer know it?
  • Is the customer’s business consolidating? 
  • Downsizing? Are you offering alternatives or leaving them for an outsider?
  • Is your primary contact’s job changing? 
  • Will he or she be more or less influential in the purchase decision? 
  • What would happen if he or she found a new job or got laid off? 


Read the full article here: http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/top-sales-dog/sales-as-change-management/

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Fear & the Real Roots of Change Resistance - from the Five Basic Fears, Albrecht

Fear & the Real Roots of Change Resistance - from the Five Basic Fears, Albrecht | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Author Dale observes how three of Karl Albrecht's core fears 'We All Live By' are directly related to change resistance."


Naming things correctly is powerful, especially when dealing with change resistance.

 

Author DALE ARSENEAULT comments on the recent Psychology Today blog post by Karl Albrecht, on the root fears that drive all others from his compact post, The (Only) Five Basic Fears We All Live By.  

  

______________________
  
....core fears are directly related to change resistance.      

   

______________________


Excerpts:


Karl helpfully includes what fear is:   An anxious feeling, caused by our anticipation of some imagined event or experience.

 

Dale observes how three of Karl's described core fears are directly related to change resistance.

   

  • Loss of Autonomy - fear of being immobilized, paralyzed, restricted, enveloped, overwhelmed, entrapped, imprisoned, smothered, or controlled by circumstances. In a physical form, it's sometimes known as claustrophobia, but it also extends to social interactions and relationships.
 
  • Separation - fear of abandonment, rejection, and loss of connectedness - of becoming a non-person - not wanted, respected, or valued by anyone else. The "silent treatment," when imposed by a group, can have a devastating psychological effect on the targeted person.
  
  • Ego-death - fear of humiliation, shame, or any other mechanism of profound self-disapproval that threatens the loss of integrity of the Self;  fear of the shattering or disintegration of one's constructed sense of lovability, capability, and worthiness.
   
Dale comments that good change strategy is not just about throwing more information at people.  It is about:
  
  • understanding the fear and dealing effectively with it.
  
  • communicate clearly about when change does not affect autonomy, separation (or connectedness) and integrity of the individual. 
  
  • being clear and transparent about instances where there is impact so people can make informed decisions, offering help as needed.


Photo credit:  by *Zephyrance - don't wake me up, posted on Flickr.com

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Classic: Different cultures challenge authority in different ways | Allon Shevat

Classic:  Different cultures challenge authority in different ways | Allon Shevat | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

..Do not assume that agreement with what you say is real; do not assume that those who challenge you are against you; and don’t ignore gossip but factor it in in societies where harmony is more valued than “truth”.

Explicit hardball challenging: Gilad (m, Israel) argues with his Israeli boss all the time. ...US based colleagues who have observed Gilad believe that Gilad shows no respect for his boss. However, once a directive is given, Gilad will carry it out to a T, never trying to stand by passively as things go bad.  Gilad and his boss play on the same soccer team and socialize together at the beach.

   

Pragmatic Controlled  Disagreement: Karen (f USA) believes that her American boss has made several critical errors over the last month. Karen i...asks some mildly  “challenging” questions after adding “well, let me play the devil’s advocate”. ...When one of her boss’s directives goes bad, Karen will be remain composed, and not go out of her way to help, allowing things “to take their course”.  Karen needs her boss’s recommendations after she leaves to “further her career”. Karen and her boss socialize only at the Christmas party.

     

.   


Posts by Deb:
     

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

         

Two Tried & True Change Models – Evergreen for Agile Change 

     

Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment

     

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

           

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Allon lists four examples in the full post.  It's a good test of your own degree of enthnocentricism to notice if you identify with the biases and blind spots he identifies so well in his posts.    His posts are very helpful for building your global citizenship and for the USA, minimizing the inept, ugly American syndrome abroad.  ~  Deb

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Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

While we often look to one hierarchical leader to guide us through difficult changes, in business and in public life, this may not be what is most effective.


__________________________
 
...shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change....
even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 

__________________________



In cases where a large scale strategic or transformative change needs to occur, leadership responsibilities need to shift and often become shared between various individuals or groups. 


Professor Duin and forum participants all shared personal cases where singular leadership was misaligned with the needs of the organization and shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change that would be by all the parties involved.   
This type of buy-in is often needed in the University setting, even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 


Whether restructuring colleges and departments to be a more competitive and well aligned university to developing ways for various technology centers to work together to delineate responsibilities, meet the needs of users, and continue evolving with the fast pace of new technology offerings, developing inroads for collaborative co-leadership is key to making broad innovative changes. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

      

    

     

        
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a reminder of the basics of change, from a higher education perspective.  It's interesting to see the siloed, bridged and shared scope definitions, appropriate to the hierarchies natural to higher education. 

In my own hometown, we have a new president about to begin, along the task of filling key, top-level vacancies in administration. Professor Ann Hill Duin, University of Minnesota has shared forum perspectives on change in academe, particularly what works, and what does not work.   ~  Deb

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, July 19, 2014 3:15 AM

Une bonne synthèse des divers types de changements...

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Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change

Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is a useful collection of webinars, handouts and materials from thought leaders via Nexus 4 Change.  Examples:

  • Whole System Transformation, A Fireside Chat with Harrison Owen (Open Space Technology), 
  • Future Search 
  • and more.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I attended the insightful and affirming webinar with Harrison Owen.   There is much to mine here.  Great resource!  ~  Deb

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Yahoo to Buy Tumblr for $1.1 Billion

Yahoo to Buy Tumblr for $1.1 Billion | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Yahoo’s move aims to make up for years of missing out on the growth of social networks and mobile devices.


Excerpts:


The deal would be the largest acquisition of a social networking company in years, surpassing Facebook’s $1 billion purchase of Instagram last year.


Tumblr has over 108 million blogs, with many highly active users.

For Yahoo and its chief executive, Marissa Mayer, buying Tumblr would be a bold move as she tries to breathe new life into the company. The deal, the seventh since Ms. Mayer defected from Google last summer to take over the company, would be her biggest yet.


It is meant to give her company more appeal to young people, and to make up for years of missing out on the revolutions in social networking and mobile devices.


News from Deb:


   
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 20, 2013 11:05 AM

The 7th and biggest deal - Yahoo acquisitions.  The stock market is not liking it --today that is. 


Now the biggest challenge yet, for Marissa Mayer,culture change at Yahoo AND smart connection with the hip, youthful Tumblr and their 108 million blogs, with many highly active users.  Wordpress watching at the gate.

I do like my venerable, old fashioned Flickr.com photo account. Yet if well handled, the coolness of Tumblr could make a good things happen at Flickr.  Challenge:  the account owners are quite a bit different.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 20, 2013 3:08 PM

More change bound to show soon if this biggest, hip buy of Tumblr has any effect on the venerable Yahoo. ~ Deb

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Rutgers, Universities, Bias: 3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns and How Timing Counts

Rutgers, Universities, Bias: 3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns and How Timing Counts | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Tensions among senior staff in universities seem to be making the news on a regular basis. Examples include leader strife at Rutgers (blame), Penn State (cascade failure to deal with a crime) and University of Virginia (abrupt leadership goings and comings.)"

At the time of this post, we have the breaking story of not only the firing of a Rutgers basketball coach because of abusive behavior  of his players, as shared widely on video, but also high level conflict of senior university administrators over who is responsible.


The interviews and documents reveal a culture in which the university was far more concerned with protecting itself from legal action than with protecting its students from an abusive coach.


Source:  The New York Times



_____________________________________



…we are biased in every single situation. There’s no such thing as objectivity. ~ Erin White 



_____________________________________

Leaders are the ones who set the tone.  They can also easily miss things in the complexity of the organizational system.  Enron, Johnson and Johnson, and the classroom cheating examples (listed in the post) are three of the sample stories that provide a good range of how challenging it is to consistently walk to talk of ethics in leadership.


Get the full story here:  



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts, a 2013 updated mash-up from a popular post from 2011 on ethics, trust and consistency, now including references on adaptive systems views of leadership. ~  Deb

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Transformational leaders and change: What's the Collective Purpose in the Process?

Transformational leaders and change:  What's the Collective Purpose in the Process? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Transformational leaders and change:  ...If your workers won't change, maybe you should.

Through their behavior, transformational leaders, foster change as an element of education, growth, experimentation, and, ultimately, change acceptance. This bears fruit in the minds of our employees: 

  • psychological freedom,
  • engagement in the thinking parts of the job, and
  • systematic organizational approval.


________________________

..It's the human touches, combined with all the formal systems that build confidence." ...be positive and avoid negativity, get to know people.


________________________


Transformational leaders are intuitive experts at motivating followers to see the collective purpose of their jobs. Understanding purpose should be a sought after identifier for members of any organization, whether the boss-types comprehend it or not.


Source:   http://t.co/kyBESMLC)    


Related articles by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Rank and yank performance metrics, "human capital" jargon, cycles of reorganization, no wonder cynicism is a continuing visitor at the performance & results table.  


The psychology of modeling the change personally to build collective purpose is worth a look.  ~  Deb

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Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks

Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
You’ve probably experienced it, that uncomfortable feeling of letting go of something tried and formerly true without knowing what is coming next. Welcome to the Neutral Zone, coined by chang...


For now, consider that the middle state of letting go to enter the Neutral Zoneincludes building improved learning agility, a developmental process as we:


1) UnLearnlet go and prepare to accept something new,

2) Adapt, pilot and test new thinking and behaviors, and

3) Demonstrate New Learning (accept and refine new behaviors.)


A great metaphor for developing agility in learning can be found in rediscovering, and perhaps fully clarifying former misunderstanding of the classic change management research of Kurt Lewin. With credit to researcher Ron Koller, Lewin’s more nuanced, elegant original change work is diagrammed below.  His work has been oversimplified over the years as simply:  


1) Unfreeze,

2) Moving (Change), and

3) Refreeze2 (into the new state. )


See the full diagram of Lewin's original interrupted time series design in the full post here as well as what is key from Lewin and other change research.


Photo credit:   VinothChandar

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts in which I have the delight of uncovering a deeper, clearer understanding of the original change work of Kurt Lewin, as well as offering a Learning Agility perspective connected to current stories, Bob Johansen's VUCA perspective and Bridge's classic transitions work (a two-parter.)  


Thanks for stopping by!  ~  Deb

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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."


Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb


Excerpts:


Elaine Rumboll suggests:


  1. Adaptability
  2. Back Up
  3. Curiosity
  4. Diversity
  5. Ease of Access
  6. Foresight
  7. Grace in Failure
  8. Hubs
  9. Inclusiveness


The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:


  • be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected
  • create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction
  • build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react
  • [let go of] things remaining stable


Read the full article here.


Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous

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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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First Follower: Change Leadership Lessons from Dancing Guy

"A new, viral classic video in that the first follower is really the dance of change leadership." 


This useful, brief video classic has been around awhile.  Yet I'm still discovering leaders and change staffers who don't know about it. Clear, compelling change teaching in under 3 minutes. ~  Deb

__________________________


The first follower transforms a lone nut into a leader.
__________________________


Excerpts:  


If you've learned a lot about leadership and making a movement, then let's watch a movement happen,  ...


Now comes the first follower with a crucial role: he publicly shows everyone how to follow. Notice the leader embraces him as an equal, so it's not about the leader anymore - it's about them, plural. Notice he's calling to his friends to join in. It takes guts to be a first follower!


The first follower transforms a lone nut into a leader. If the leader is the flint, the first follower is the spark that makes the fire.


Now here come 2 more, then 3 more. Now we've got momentum. This is the tipping point! Now we've got a movement!


__________________________

   

As more people jump in, it's no longer risky.

__________________________


If they were on the fence before, there's no reason not to join now. They won't be ridiculed, they won't stand out, and they will be part of the in-crowd, if they hurry.


Over the next minute you'll see the rest who prefer to be part of the crowd, because eventually they'd be ridiculed for not joining.


And ladies and gentlemen that is how a movement is made!


See the official, full transcript at http://sivers.org/ff 

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Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It's a science AND an art; people are involved.  Treat change management as being of equal importance as the technical aspects of implementation.

   

Yes, I've seen many of these mistakes over the years.  Most recently: Modeling someone else's culture as a change blueprint, being penny-wise and pound-foolish about budgeting for change, staying inside the bubble of your own viewpoint (item#1 below.)  See if you agree with this list.

   

_____________________________

   

5% or 15%?  Underfunding!  "Gartner recommends ...allocat[ing] an average of 15% ...to ...change management, inclusive of training ...more, if ...the corporate culture is more change-averse." 

_____________________________

   

Excerpted:

  

...the most common mistakes:

   

1) Not Seeking Outside Expertise
Rarely do companies have deep change management expertise, though some [seek] to build this capability inhouse. Typically companies expect [their own people] to foster stability, eliminate process deviation, and minimize risk ...—and are rewarded for doing so. Expecting these same people to introduce change and “rock the boat” is ...counter to the normal, expected behaviors.

   

2) Short-Cutting the Change Process
... leaders disband the change management effort prematurely, cease to communicate, and stop engaging stakeholders too soon.  ...The greater the ...change ...the longer the ...change “sustainability” phase that is required.   


3) Executive Delegating Change Leadership Responsibility
....executive sponsors ...not seen or heard from again; sponsors ...uninformed of their initiative’s progress and unsure how to help; and sponsors not clear about what priority an initiative had among multiple business objectives.


4) Under-Funding the Change Management Effort
A 2011 Gartner survey found that companies under-invest in organizational change management. Companies allocate, on average, only 5% of the overall system implementation budget to the change management effort. Gartner recommends that companies allocate an average of 15% of the program budget to organizational change management, inclusive of training — but more, if changes are significant or the corporate culture is more change-averse.


5) Not Integrating Change Management with Program Management
...this can be a separate plan, with the critical milestones listed on the master program or project plan. ...program success is greatly diminished when the change management activities are “bolted on” ....

   

Read the full article here.    http://www.leadersbeacon.com/most-common-change-management-mistakes-companies-make/


For more Deep Change expertise, see our panel here:  http://www.scoop.it/t/change-leadership-vision/p/1549448247/the-trusted-advisors-with-open-space-event-was-a-hit-in-las-vegas    (I'm in orange, facilitating the Open Space portion.)



Via Charney Coaching & Consulting
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Strategic Agility? FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous

Strategic Agility?  FLIP to thrive in our VUCA world:  Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"If you stand still, you’ll fall behind in today’s VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. Movement alone, however, doesn’t guarantee success." ~ Liz Guthridge


Great post by Liz!  On her blog, I commented that Liz speaks to a practical tool for VUCA preparedness so well, especially in cultivating a state of strategic agility, a big interest of mine this past year in assisting clients.


Excerpts:

.

By committing to FLIP (focus, listen, involve and personalize), you’re leading from wherever you are. And you’re serving as a role model to encourage others to be active, not passive, about your responsibilities.

.

With #3, INVOLVE, Liz talks about smart-mob organizing, bringing together groups of people for a common business challenge or social change.  This can easily include social media or other technology.

  • Liz is conducting a Best Practice Institute webinar on Change Through Crowdsourcing: How to Use Peer-by-Peer Practices to Transform Organizations on June 19 at 2 pm

.

With smart mobs, you can collaborate and cooperate in new, clever ways faster and more effective than ever before.

.

Rather than be content living with uncertainty and ambiguity in a VUCA world, you’re switching them around. You’re showing “agility” instead of “ambiguity” by seeking “understanding” instead of floundering in uncertainty.


Full post here.

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