Change Management...
Follow
Find tag "leaders"
16.2K views | +0 today
Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Build a change platform, not a change program, Whole system change | McKinsey

Build a change platform, not a change program, Whole system change | McKinsey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It’s not you, it’s your company. Management Innovation eXchange founders Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini believe that continuous improvement requires the creation of change platforms, rather than change programs ordained and implemented from the top.
    
______________________________
     
The problem lies in beliefs about who is responsible for launching change and how change is implemented.

______________________________
      

Transformational-change initiatives have a dismal track record. In 1996, Harvard Business School professor John Kotter claimed that nearly 70 percent of large-scale change programs didn’t meet their goals,1 and virtually every survey since has shown similar results. Why is change so confounding? ....The problem lies in beliefs about who is responsible for launching change and how change is implemented.

        

The reality is that today’s organizations were simply never designed to change proactively and deeply—they were built for discipline and efficiency, enforced through hierarchy and routinization. As a result, there’s a mismatch between the pace of change in the external environment and the fastest possible pace of change at most organizations. If it were otherwise, we wouldn’t see so many incumbents struggling to intercept the future.

       

In most organizations, change is regarded as an episodic interruption of the status quo, something initiated and managed from the top. The power to initiate strategic change is concentrated there, and every change program must be endorsed, scripted, and piloted before launch.

         

Transformational change,...is typically belated and convulsive—and often commences only after a “regime change.” What’s needed is a real-time, socially constructed approach to change, so that the leader’s job isn’t to design a change program but to build a change platform—one that allows anyone to initiate change, recruit confederates, suggest solutions, and launch experiments.

       

Related change posts by Deb:

      

         

  

   
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This approach is consistent with Whole Systems Change approaches, from my connection with the Dannemiller Tyson approach.  Good framework here! ~ Deb

more...
Change Et Al.'s curator insight, November 21, 2014 1:55 AM

This is why building the culture of change is more important than one specific initiative. In today's world, change continues to happen at every level, function and geography in different size and form. It will only be successful if Change is part of the DNA.

Claude Emond's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:25 AM

Be the Change !

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Change leader competencies that also include mindsets. All can be developed."


This is a handy list worth reviewing from colleague Gail Severini. There's more to come, including a top-ten competencies for change agents those who are the focus of the change.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


Change Leaders' Competencies include:


1.  Determination and discipline - The leader …“Has a profound resolve toward the specific shifts the organization has identified as essential for its future success,...” And, has the personal discipline to ...ake difficult and challenging actions.


2.  Self-Knowledge and mindfulness - ...calm in the midst of high-stress, dynamic change. The ability to concentrate and be attentive to other people and concepts...are intricately connected.


6.  Integrative thinking - Once we accept that transformational change presents enormous ambiguity it becomes obvious that the ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”.


7.  Culture awareness - An understanding of the organization’s current and desired cultures [and] plans for making the shift.


10.  Make meaning - Making the change relevant to every resource who has to make the transition --the  unusual capability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, to ...help them ...navigate their way through it. 


Read the full post here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."


Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb


Excerpts:  


There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

___________________________

   

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

___________________________


The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.


Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

  • “Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”
   
  • “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  


She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.


  • “Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.


Photo credit:  JD Hancock

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Fear & the Real Roots of Change Resistance - from the Five Basic Fears, Albrecht

Fear & the Real Roots of Change Resistance - from the Five Basic Fears, Albrecht | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Author Dale observes how three of Karl Albrecht's core fears 'We All Live By' are directly related to change resistance."


Naming things correctly is powerful, especially when dealing with change resistance.

 

Author DALE ARSENEAULT comments on the recent Psychology Today blog post by Karl Albrecht, on the root fears that drive all others from his compact post, The (Only) Five Basic Fears We All Live By.  

  

______________________
  
....core fears are directly related to change resistance.      

   

______________________


Excerpts:


Karl helpfully includes what fear is:   An anxious feeling, caused by our anticipation of some imagined event or experience.

 

Dale observes how three of Karl's described core fears are directly related to change resistance.

   

  • Loss of Autonomy - fear of being immobilized, paralyzed, restricted, enveloped, overwhelmed, entrapped, imprisoned, smothered, or controlled by circumstances. In a physical form, it's sometimes known as claustrophobia, but it also extends to social interactions and relationships.
 
  • Separation - fear of abandonment, rejection, and loss of connectedness - of becoming a non-person - not wanted, respected, or valued by anyone else. The "silent treatment," when imposed by a group, can have a devastating psychological effect on the targeted person.
  
  • Ego-death - fear of humiliation, shame, or any other mechanism of profound self-disapproval that threatens the loss of integrity of the Self;  fear of the shattering or disintegration of one's constructed sense of lovability, capability, and worthiness.
   
Dale comments that good change strategy is not just about throwing more information at people.  It is about:
  
  • understanding the fear and dealing effectively with it.
  
  • communicate clearly about when change does not affect autonomy, separation (or connectedness) and integrity of the individual. 
  
  • being clear and transparent about instances where there is impact so people can make informed decisions, offering help as needed.


Photo credit:  by *Zephyrance - don't wake me up, posted on Flickr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @ ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012

March 15 Deadline Approaching: Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors @  ACMP Global, April, Las Vegas 2012 | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


As a curator of CMRsite.com for which this is the curation stream on ScoopIt as well as Change Leadership Watch, I'm pleased to be on a unique panel to share diverse perspectives on the role of the Trusted Advisor in today's turbulent world.  


We'll also be trying something new at global conference of this nature, using Open Space to explore the nature of collaborative learning within a session format.


Note the approaching conference deadline of March 15, 2012.


Here's a few excerpts from our program as well as from Liz Guthridge, who is facilitating our panel and organized this conference event:


What does it mean to be a trusted change advisor in today's turbulent times?


My colleague, Liz Guthridge, has written a helpful post about the Trusted Advisor role in supporting the work of leaders, outlining what we'll be covering in our session at ACMP Las Vegas. An excerpt:


[Liz] re-read quite a few of David Maister’s tips, primarily from his book, The Trusted Advisor...[a] 2000 classic. ...Some favorite things:


  • “I am not the center of the universe.”
  • “A point of view doesn’t commit you for life.”
  • “Reach out to notice, and acknowledge, something that has been held back in or about the other person.”
  • “Who am I serving by my present approach?”
  • “Assigning blame will trap me; taking responsibility will empower me.”
.
There's more, including biographies of who is presenting on the panel, photos, including yours truly, and links to register for the conference.
.
Do comment if you plan to attend.  It would be great to see you there!
~  Deb
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

While we often look to one hierarchical leader to guide us through difficult changes, in business and in public life, this may not be what is most effective.


__________________________
 
...shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change....
even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 

__________________________



In cases where a large scale strategic or transformative change needs to occur, leadership responsibilities need to shift and often become shared between various individuals or groups. 


Professor Duin and forum participants all shared personal cases where singular leadership was misaligned with the needs of the organization and shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change that would be by all the parties involved.   
This type of buy-in is often needed in the University setting, even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 


Whether restructuring colleges and departments to be a more competitive and well aligned university to developing ways for various technology centers to work together to delineate responsibilities, meet the needs of users, and continue evolving with the fast pace of new technology offerings, developing inroads for collaborative co-leadership is key to making broad innovative changes. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

      

    

     

        
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a reminder of the basics of change, from a higher education perspective.  It's interesting to see the siloed, bridged and shared scope definitions, appropriate to the hierarchies natural to higher education. 

In my own hometown, we have a new president about to begin, along the task of filling key, top-level vacancies in administration. Professor Ann Hill Duin, University of Minnesota has shared forum perspectives on change in academe, particularly what works, and what does not work.   ~  Deb

more...
Pascal Vedel's curator insight, July 19, 2014 3:15 AM

Une bonne synthèse des divers types de changements...

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

  • take a break from their normal day jobs
  • creatively solve problems and drive change
  • Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents
  • agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition
  • knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs
  • collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth
  • evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization
  • serves for a period of one year
   

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It's a science AND an art; people are involved.  Treat change management as being of equal importance as the technical aspects of implementation.

   

Yes, I've seen many of these mistakes over the years.  Most recently: Modeling someone else's culture as a change blueprint, being penny-wise and pound-foolish about budgeting for change, staying inside the bubble of your own viewpoint (item#1 below.)  See if you agree with this list.

   

_____________________________

   

5% or 15%?  Underfunding!  "Gartner recommends ...allocat[ing] an average of 15% ...to ...change management, inclusive of training ...more, if ...the corporate culture is more change-averse." 

_____________________________

   

Excerpted:

  

...the most common mistakes:

   

1) Not Seeking Outside Expertise
Rarely do companies have deep change management expertise, though some [seek] to build this capability inhouse. Typically companies expect [their own people] to foster stability, eliminate process deviation, and minimize risk ...—and are rewarded for doing so. Expecting these same people to introduce change and “rock the boat” is ...counter to the normal, expected behaviors.

   

2) Short-Cutting the Change Process
... leaders disband the change management effort prematurely, cease to communicate, and stop engaging stakeholders too soon.  ...The greater the ...change ...the longer the ...change “sustainability” phase that is required.   


3) Executive Delegating Change Leadership Responsibility
....executive sponsors ...not seen or heard from again; sponsors ...uninformed of their initiative’s progress and unsure how to help; and sponsors not clear about what priority an initiative had among multiple business objectives.


4) Under-Funding the Change Management Effort
A 2011 Gartner survey found that companies under-invest in organizational change management. Companies allocate, on average, only 5% of the overall system implementation budget to the change management effort. Gartner recommends that companies allocate an average of 15% of the program budget to organizational change management, inclusive of training — but more, if changes are significant or the corporate culture is more change-averse.


5) Not Integrating Change Management with Program Management
...this can be a separate plan, with the critical milestones listed on the master program or project plan. ...program success is greatly diminished when the change management activities are “bolted on” ....

   

Read the full article here.    http://www.leadersbeacon.com/most-common-change-management-mistakes-companies-make/


For more Deep Change expertise, see our panel here:  http://www.scoop.it/t/change-leadership-vision/p/1549448247/the-trusted-advisors-with-open-space-event-was-a-hit-in-las-vegas    (I'm in orange, facilitating the Open Space portion.)



Via Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Trusted Advisors with Open Space event was a Hit in Las Vegas!

The Trusted Advisors with Open Space event was a Hit in Las Vegas! | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"I asked the 'change elite,' how many of you know about/have participated in an Open Space event?"


Well, among change practitioners, only about 8 - 10 hands were raised in a group of over 150 attendees at the global Association of Change Management Practitioners in Las Vegas this past week, (April 1-4, 2012) where we discussed Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.

_____________________


"First people need to know you, then like you, then trust you."

_____________________



Preliminary photos from our Open Space event are also shared on this link.  


Chip Heath, coined us as the "change elite" - that would be all of us attending ACMP 2012 conference.  Heh.  Professor Heath, Stanford, is the author of Switch: How to Change Things when Change is Hard, and was our first keynote speaker this past Sunday.


What a pleasure it was to be a part of a robust Q & A discussion with an elite group of panel-mates followed by offering Open Space to over 150.  Our panel was a mix of change leader internals at major, well-known large companies and external consultants.  


I was in a middle role, as I functioned as a hybrid internal/external while I worked at the University of Michigan in Organization Development:


  • Liz Guthridge - Session Facilitator, Connect Consulting Group;
  • Deborah Nystrom - Open Space facilitator (me); Reveln Consulting & CMRsite.com; 
  • Jim Bohn, PhD., Global Director, CMO - Johnson Controls;
  • Gail Severini, Conner Partners;
  • Michael Nestor, Vice President, Head of Change Management, Bayer Group

   

And yes, it was Vegas.  I've include ONE photo on this post of my recent Las Vegas tour, the day before the conference started.   (As they say, what happens in Vegas, stays on Facebook, twitter, LinkedIn and now, ScoopIt.)


We also welcome you to the discussion via our new "Trusted Advisors" LinkedIn discussion group, which is an open, join-able group.


Check out the session Slideshare there, that includes our Open Space and Trusted Advisors handout, which I'll also upload to my Reveln blog soon in .pdf format.


Meanwhile, if any of you are in my consultant & coach, or small business circles, you may be interested in a free webinar I'm doing this evening on LinkedIn, including the  updates coming to LinkedIn. One of them is the "People you May Know" function. You can read my post about this via today's Social Media Learning Lab post here.


One of my favorite sayings that is essential to LinkedIn is listed above.  It is about building trusted, mutually beneficial connections: the know, like, and trust equation.


Thanks for stopping by!

more...
No comment yet.