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The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Digital hives: Creating a surge around change | McKinsey

Digital hives: Creating a surge around change | McKinsey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

[Successful] "Large-scale engagement of the workforce requires...a determination by management to loosen if not relinquish its traditional top-down approach, and an ability to demonstrate how digital activities complement offline or other real-world events.

   

Four ways to drive change using the digital hive concepts:

       

1. Engaging the workforce in better strategy

Early experience suggests that better results follow when a problem is presented in stages to avoid overwhelming the participants, when a company uses volunteers rather than conscripts, when it offers training on how to think about innovation, when energy- and community-building offline events (such as workshops or weekly cafeteria sessions) supplement the online discussions, and when executives strike an authentic tone.

    

2. Connecting silos with a social chain

One of the biggest organizational challenges is to break siloed behavior and get employees talking to one another and cooperating across intracompany boundaries. …[What’s} promising …the “social chain”: a digital platform that …allows employees to work “out loud” online by sharing how they do things. It also encourages people who were previously isolated in part of the chain to identify areas where they depend on others and to tackle problems or bottlenecks collaboratively. 

       

3. Enlisting key customers to improve the proposition

KLM, the Dutch airline, has successfully used this approach to foster a stronger client-centric mind-set among its employees. The company’s executives opted for a large-scale digital dialogue between KLM and its emerging customers …involving 1,500 participants from small and midsize businesses, who generated more than 1,000 concrete ideas and 4,000 other contributions. Management and customer-facing staff from KLM Netherlands actively participated in these discussions. …It… “opened our eyes to the possibilities of social media to build a far stronger customer focus among our staff.” KLM has since become one of the airline industry’s foremost social-media exponents.

    

4. Uniting a dispersed sales force to drive higher sales

…[A] new network, implemented at minimal cost, puts collective expertise in the hands of each of the frontline reps, binds them more closely to the organization, and generates faster performance feedback. Within a year of the start, the company has increased cross- and upselling rates to more than 50 percent, from 4 percent, realizing an increase in gross margins of $25 million.

    

Leading while letting go

Digital hives involve large numbers of previously “disenfranchised” employees in setting strategy, company-wide transformations, and customer-outreach initiatives. Creating these hives requires a delicate balancing act—not least a willingness by top managers to let go. Managers should not be afraid to commit themselves explicitly to acting on the results of these initiatives and should encourage unrestrained participation, however unpredictable the consequences.


Related posts by Deb:
        

           

              

         


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The quality of conversation, or lack of it, is telling and provides insights about what is current and what is pending. McKinsey offers four solid examples of how to drive change focusing on digital “hives”—designed to solve a particular problem or set of problems as well as to build new behaviors, so they can become new habits.

This is how a culture shift can happen and sustain itself. ~ D

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Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:54 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work

Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Karl Marx created very sophisticated theories of labor value already in 19th century. His view was that capitalistic system will lead to alienation of work. Of course his writings reflected his time..." 

____________________

...Specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen.

____________________


Excerpts from the post:  


As the company grows and more people are joining in the cooperative processes of product-making, only option to grow is the work division, specialization.




This is needed because of two things: 

  • first of all there are new skills that are needed, 
  • secondly people need to have time to grow their expertise on these matters. 
[It is] specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen. There will be different functions like marketing, R & D, logistics > inside these functions there are further divisions...

The diagram on this post is of how a software organization might look like from the point of view of alienation.

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Alienation means less dependence to the actual results of the work and more dependence on the abstract knowledge.

____________________

Click the post title to read the full post.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 3:41 PM

"It is curious how often you humans manage to obtain that which you do not want."    ~ Spock in 'Errand of Mercy'


Cultural factors and practices, including possible Organization Development (OD) activities like Open Space and Whole Scale Change conferences may help organizations regain creativity and connection to vision and meaning **WITH** metrics. Some companies can do it and hold on to the alignment. 

Many have it for awhile, then lose it. SouthWest Airlines, for example, has been touted recently as perhaps losing sight of what has made them so unique and resilient in a VERY tough industry.
 

Steelcase, a 100+ year company, continues to reinvent and renew itself. Building something tangible and taking pride in it is probably a major factor, no matter what your role is in the company. Working in the finance industry, being distanced through numbers in ways more than in a typical company, perhaps not so much, being able to grab ahold of the meaning and hold on.   ~ Deb

PS:  I've listed this post on Change Management Resources as well.

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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection

10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Leading change is about being connected to and engaging everyone affected by the change, a strength of social media.

 

Change leaders have engaged infrastructure that includes social media in other examples on this newsletter curation stream including IBM, Proctor & Gamble and Apple.

 

Excerpts:

Acceptance of change – processes, services, working relationships, policies and more - can be accelerated across the organization through the real-time sharing of experiences.

 

Social networking and collaboration applications are extremely effective ways of bringing employees together to perform new processes and to share experiences – both the successes and the temporary setbacks. People with common interests or related roles can form communities to learn from and support one another.

 

 Deb:  At key points, it's important to create the environments and provide several good tools that allow staff to do this for themselves, instead of attempting to engineer all of this from the top.  Social media policies and guidelines help immensely.


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Build a change platform, not a change program, Whole system change | McKinsey

Build a change platform, not a change program, Whole system change | McKinsey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

It’s not you, it’s your company. Management Innovation eXchange founders Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini believe that continuous improvement requires the creation of change platforms, rather than change programs ordained and implemented from the top.
    
______________________________
     
The problem lies in beliefs about who is responsible for launching change and how change is implemented.

______________________________
      

Transformational-change initiatives have a dismal track record. In 1996, Harvard Business School professor John Kotter claimed that nearly 70 percent of large-scale change programs didn’t meet their goals,1 and virtually every survey since has shown similar results. Why is change so confounding? ....The problem lies in beliefs about who is responsible for launching change and how change is implemented.

        

The reality is that today’s organizations were simply never designed to change proactively and deeply—they were built for discipline and efficiency, enforced through hierarchy and routinization. As a result, there’s a mismatch between the pace of change in the external environment and the fastest possible pace of change at most organizations. If it were otherwise, we wouldn’t see so many incumbents struggling to intercept the future.

       

In most organizations, change is regarded as an episodic interruption of the status quo, something initiated and managed from the top. The power to initiate strategic change is concentrated there, and every change program must be endorsed, scripted, and piloted before launch.

         

Transformational change,...is typically belated and convulsive—and often commences only after a “regime change.” What’s needed is a real-time, socially constructed approach to change, so that the leader’s job isn’t to design a change program but to build a change platform—one that allows anyone to initiate change, recruit confederates, suggest solutions, and launch experiments.

       

Related change posts by Deb:

      

         

  

   
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This approach is consistent with Whole Systems Change approaches, from my connection with the Dannemiller Tyson approach.  Good framework here! ~ Deb

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Change Et Al.'s curator insight, November 21, 2014 1:55 AM

This is why building the culture of change is more important than one specific initiative. In today's world, change continues to happen at every level, function and geography in different size and form. It will only be successful if Change is part of the DNA.

Claude Emond's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:25 AM

Be the Change !

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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,
but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:


If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Harry Cannon's curator insight, August 1, 2013 10:04 AM

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples

Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The HBR post cites several case studies illustrating why many transformations fizzle, then two examples for how to turn it around."


The cautionary tales, names removed, are listed first.  Then the positive stories follow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


______________________

   

But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

______________________


A health insurer demonstrates a repeated pattern of 3- to 5-year cycles where it launches a change program, takes awhile for managers to get behind it, and then more time to get it funded. A program gets funded for a year but then everyone loses interest, and it gets defunded and dies.


Recently they're failing faster; the three- to five-year cycle is moving to two to three years. But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.


Just about everyone in the company agrees the culture is dysfunctional:

   

  • Some point to politics - competition between the COO and CFO blocking each other's progress. 
  • The CEO also had a way of questioning and stress-testing people that discouraged risk-taking => a "play it safe" mentality.
  • Executives who want quick wins scope projects to be done in a year. Most change programs there needed multiple years, so by the time a program extends beyond year one, executives move onto a new initiative.


What countermeasures are there to break a tragic change cycle like this?


______________________

   

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.

______________________


Successful efforts at health insurance companies Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan offer insights:


Organizational realignment — The structure of an organization determines the incentives that drive identity, behavior, and employee understanding of roles and responsibilities and priorities, as well as a sense of ownership and accountability.


Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's tried a more traditional functional management structure but then found it lost customer focus.

  

  • It appointed leaders to run market segments with profit and loss responsibility with the focus of changing the product mix and improve profitability. 
  • By organizing by customer, cross-functional changes became much easier to implement, and there was a dramatic turnaround in business results.
   

Improvement methods — a platform for doing work nimbly and at low cost included:

  

  • Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture as employees are empowered  so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts. 
  • Tactics such as daily huddles drove immediate wins and helped entrench a culture of empowerment.


Employee engagement — Employees fundamentally want themselves and the company to be successful, so successful change agents listen to their needs and help them transition.


Aetna describes how new CEO John Rowe and the senior team "sought out employees at all levels — those who were well connected, sensitive to the company culture, and widely respected — to get their input on the strategy, design and execution of intended process changes."


Executives at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan went into the field to gather input and communicate their commitment to change. Employees were trained in improvement methods ("Lean"), with every employee going through two sessions in accountability training.


Curator: Enrich your perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing.


Contact Deb Nystrom here for an initial consultation, without obligation.

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Harry Cannon's comment, November 1, 2012 11:30 AM
See article in HBR Jul-Aug 2012 by Katzenback et al.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 3, 2012 8:10 PM
Thanks Harry. I appreciate the link.
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Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed: MSN Money & HBR

Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed:  MSN Money & HBR | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Let employees tell their stories. ~ The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer."


This reminds me "slow is fast," from Theory U, popularized by Otto Scharmer.  This thinking is not new to change strategy, but it can be difficult to those used to cascade implementations. 

The power of story is very real when combined with honest questions, that is, if you ask the question, you are truely open to hearing and responding fully to the answers. ~ Deb


_______________________


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows.   

_______________________


Excerpts:   


"Conventional approaches to change management urge leaders to set a vision and cascade it down the organization.


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows. The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer.


Instead of dictating how the organization will evolve, take a high-involvement approach. Describe the problem you are trying to solve and then ask others how they would address it.


During these discussions, roughly lay out your vision, but ask employees how they picture the change taking place. This takes time and effort of course. But the payoff is huge."


Source:   Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\www.hbr.org).


Photo credit:  by Jill Clardy

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is never so powerful a change impetus as when the people own the story.  There are many famous quotes on this concept, yet suffice it to say large system change, whole system change, large group methods all are centered in the power of story and how it goes forward.  ~  Deb

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