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Robert Kegan & Immunity to Change - YouTube

Prof. Robert Kegan sets up the environment for an inquiry on WHY there is a gap between a person's verbalized intention to change and what the person actually does.
     
He recalls an illustration in which heart doctors advise their patients to take their medications as prescribed or literally die. Yet the follow up research shows that only 1 out 7 actually take their medications. The other 6 have just as great a desire to stay alive and yet risk death by not following their doctor. He proposes a deep need for some ways of thinking about what is in the way between a person's genuine intention and what the person is actually able to bring about.


What is this gap -- 'Immunity to Change' -- and how can it be addressed?

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

From the video, Why are you NOT taking the life preserving drug? There were great examples of "immunity to change."  
    
These are very useful for looking at how change happens on a personal and organizational example.   Key question, "What would be the biggest worry if you DID take the drug every day."  This question was misinterpreted incorrectly, and this is lesson. How to see differently. How to alter mindset and review assumptions.  ~ Deb

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

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See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools
     

      

      

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Holacracies, wirearchies and simply feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change.  It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations already committing to it, like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

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Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2014 2:23 PM

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."


Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb


Excerpts:  


There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

___________________________

   

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

___________________________


The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.


Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

  • “Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”
   
  • “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  


She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.


  • “Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.


Photo credit:  JD Hancock

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Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals: Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur

Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals:  Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

In 1996 a disaster of historic proportion happened on the peak of Mount Everest. In the entire climbing season, 15 climbers died. Eight of those deaths took place on a single day."


____________________


In the corporate world we’re often focused on achieving our goals at all costs. This eventually reaches the status of dogma.

____________________
     


Journalist and mountain climber Jon Krakauer captured this story in his book “Into Thin Air;” he was on the mountain that day.
    
Krakauer puts part of the blame on the stubbornness of a climbing guide. While there is some evidence to support this claim, most climbers are, by definition, stubborn and arrogant. Yet disasters of this magnitude are rare. 
    
...
In this case the teams encountered a traffic jam at Hilary pass that slowed progression, and disregarded their turnaround time.   ...Members, however, continued on reaching the summit   ...Doug Hansen, a postal service worker from the New Zealand group, was the last to summit. While he made it to the top, the odds were against him ever coming back.

Like seven others, he died on the descent. 

     

...What would it look like to embrace uncertainty?

      

____________________
   
Start with your means.  Don't wait for the perfect opportunity.
   
____________________
      
    

Professor Saras Sarasvathy interviewed forty-five “successful” entrepreneurs and found a disconnect between our thoughts on entrepreneurs as successfully pursuing a goal-oriented approach and reality.

    

"An entrepreneur's ...precise endpoint was often mysterious to them, and their means of proceeding reflected this. Overwhelmingly, they scoffed at the goals-first doctrine of Locke and Latham. Almost none of them suggested creating a detailed business plan or doing comprehensive market research to hone the details of the product they were aiming to release."

  

The most valuable skill of a successful entrepreneur...[is] the ability to adopt an unconventional approach to learning: an improvisational flexibility  [including] a willingness to change the destination itself, [using] a set of principles she calls “effectuation.”

      

 “Start with your means. Don’t wait for the perfect opportunity. Start taking action, based on what you have readily available: what you are, what you know and who you know.”

     

A second is the “principle of affordable loss”  ...— ask how big the loss would be if you failed. So long as it would be tolerable, that’s all you need to know. Take that next step, and see what happens.

        

“The quest for certainty blocks the search for meaning,” argued the social psychologist Erich Fromm. “Uncertainty is the very condition to impel man to unfold his powers.” Uncertainty is where things happen. It is where the opportunities — for success, for happiness, for really living — are waiting.

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    



     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  

    

_______________________
   
“A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at.”  

~ Bruce Lee
_______________________

     

This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  

    

~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 25, 2014 2:18 PM

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  
    
This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  


~  Deb 

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With the Zombies? Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey

With the Zombies?  Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is the first story in a series featuring Sara taking the path many seasoned change practitioners (Daryl Conner's intended audience) follow as they come to terms with how they work with clients.  It kicks off a provocative, insightful series. 


The basic storyline: 


The hero pursues a series of adventures that takes her beyond the safety of her ordinary life in order to learn some vital lessons important to her and others.


In the process of her odyssey, she leaves her status quo, evolves into a wiser person, and returns to share her insights with those who could benefit.


....Sara had become “comfortably numb” without ever knowing what happened.

 

Sample questions:


  • Have you heard a wakeup call but been reluctant to heed the implications?


  • To what degree has victimization played a part in any disillusionment you feel (or have felt) about your change work?


  • To what degree has sovereignty played a part in avoiding or recovering from being a zombie practitioner?
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I zombie-photo-bombed this update ~ just to have some fun with the serious side of change initiatives that tend fall into that 70%+ failure rate abyss.


This is a helpful series from one of the founders of Change Management, Daryl Conner, who writes about what it takes to be alive in the change practitioner's role, considering to what you say "yes"  and to what you say "no" - especially before you become "zombiefied" or perhaps to bring you back from the dead. ~  Deb


Related posts by Deb:

 

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Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed: MSN Money & HBR

Let employees tell their stories - Change on Speed:  MSN Money & HBR | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Let employees tell their stories. ~ The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer."


This reminds me "slow is fast," from Theory U, popularized by Otto Scharmer.  This thinking is not new to change strategy, but it can be difficult to those used to cascade implementations. 

The power of story is very real when combined with honest questions, that is, if you ask the question, you are truely open to hearing and responding fully to the answers. ~ Deb


_______________________


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows.   

_______________________


Excerpts:   


"Conventional approaches to change management urge leaders to set a vision and cascade it down the organization.


When people make their own decisions, they are more dedicated to what follows. The energy needed to drive change comes through a sense of ownership over the answer.


Instead of dictating how the organization will evolve, take a high-involvement approach. Describe the problem you are trying to solve and then ask others how they would address it.


During these discussions, roughly lay out your vision, but ask employees how they picture the change taking place. This takes time and effort of course. But the payoff is huge."


Source:   Harvard Business Review and HBR.org (http:\\www.hbr.org).


Photo credit:  by Jill Clardy

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is never so powerful a change impetus as when the people own the story.  There are many famous quotes on this concept, yet suffice it to say large system change, whole system change, large group methods all are centered in the power of story and how it goes forward.  ~  Deb

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