Change Management Resources
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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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With the Zombies? Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey

With the Zombies?  Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is the first story in a series featuring Sara taking the path many seasoned change practitioners (Daryl Conner's intended audience) follow as they come to terms with how they work with clients.  It kicks off a provocative, insightful series. 


The basic storyline: 


The hero pursues a series of adventures that takes her beyond the safety of her ordinary life in order to learn some vital lessons important to her and others.


In the process of her odyssey, she leaves her status quo, evolves into a wiser person, and returns to share her insights with those who could benefit.


....Sara had become “comfortably numb” without ever knowing what happened.

 

Sample questions:


  • Have you heard a wakeup call but been reluctant to heed the implications?


  • To what degree has victimization played a part in any disillusionment you feel (or have felt) about your change work?


  • To what degree has sovereignty played a part in avoiding or recovering from being a zombie practitioner?
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I zombie-photo-bombed this update ~ just to have some fun with the serious side of change initiatives that tend fall into that 70%+ failure rate abyss.


This is a helpful series from one of the founders of Change Management, Daryl Conner, who writes about what it takes to be alive in the change practitioner's role, considering to what you say "yes"  and to what you say "no" - especially before you become "zombiefied" or perhaps to bring you back from the dead. ~  Deb


Related posts by Deb:

 

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Motivated, Engaged Change: Thinking AND Acting Systemically

Motivated, Engaged Change:  Thinking AND Acting Systemically | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Acting systemically requires systems thinking in tandem. When people discover their own responsibility for perpetuating a problem, they are more motivated to change and take action outside of their own silos.

   

The Pegasus blog is a great resource for complex but not necessarily complicated change.  Here's a few excerpts on systems thinking and acting that features some gold nuggets of thinking in community, systemically.  ~ Deb

   

 _______________________________

   

“What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

 _______________________________

      

Excerpted:

   

Leaders committed to social change increasingly recognize the importance of “getting the whole system in the room.”   This means:  


  1. identifying the diverse stakeholders who impact and are affected by a problem
  2. creating forums where they can meet and share their respective points of view.

   

There are many approaches to bringing such people together, including Future Search, the World Café, and Open Space.


We call these approaches acting systemically because they facilitate communication among a wide range of stakeholders who might not have previously spoken or listened to each other.

  

...stakeholders also have individual commitments that often run counter to their espoused collective commitment.

  

...thinking systemically, people ...begin to see how they unwittingly undermine their own best intentions through their short-term actions.

  

They are moved to consider the question, “What might we have to give up as an individual organization in order to serve the system as a whole?”

  

Three options are listed in the blog post including this provocative example:

  

They might streamline or even close their own organization and shift its services to other organizations in the system who are better positioned to deliver them.    


See the full post here.

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Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question? What's the Goal?

Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question?  What's the Goal? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The answers we get out of data will always depend on the questions we ask.


Useful.  It also reminded me of one of the tools we use in Whole Scale change thinking:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate, or DPPE.  Thanks to twitter follower  @resilientchange for this link this week.


_______________________________

"Throughout history ....science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

_______________________________



Excerpts:


Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.


One key role we play in the process is choosing which data to look at. That this choice is often made for us by what happens to be easiest to measure doesn't make it any less consequential, as Samuel Arbesman writes, 


  • "Throughout history, in one field after another, science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."


In his book,  political forecaster Nate Silver writes about a crucial element, how we go about revising our views as new data comes in.


Silver is a big believer in the Bayesian approach to probability, in which we all have our own subjective ideas about how things are going to pan out, but follow the same straightforward rules in revising those assessments as we get new information.


It's a process that uses data to refine our thinking. But it doesn't work without some thinking first.


Read the full article here.


Perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining via Reveln.


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