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Change Management Resources
The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Talent and Performance Development
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Tools Review ~ And Change: Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Tools Review ~ And Change:  Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As this book fits measurement and planning, it should also be a great resource for anyone working through change.  Not doing may be smarter than doing when it comes to using certain approaches and tools.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 4:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 3:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."


 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.


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...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment
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What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.


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"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead." Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. ~ Deb


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It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  


Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:


  • Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way
  • Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes
  • Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other
  • Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment
  • Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change



A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  


  • Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne


What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?



Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine

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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

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   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

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Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

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It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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