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6 Words for Chaos ~ High Creative, Low on Scale, Implications for International Change

6 Words for Chaos ~ High Creative, Low on Scale, Implications for International Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Two from the list of six:

“”Bardak”,a Turkish borrowed word meaning messy and disorganized, although the translation is “brothel”.


“Buka-umavulaka”, an Aramaic borrow word, a “high level” form of speech, also implying very very deep chaos.


Balagan, yet another popular borrowed word to describe lack of order.

   

The great number of words available represents a linguistic need to differentiate between various levels of  poor organization of of our society
    
Reasons for this disorder are:


1) A disdain for planning, which is seen as a luxury of the opulent.


2) A lack of belief in systems, and massive use of relationships to bypass systems.


3) The proclivity to re open decisions because nothing is very final, ever.


4) An immigrant society with few shared ways of doing things.


5) Belief that the individual is and must be empowered with ingenuity to work around barriers and obstacles.


All of the above create a large balagan, and a lot of creativity, and a low level of scalability


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Allon's blogs contain helpful insights into international change considerations and why structure will only take you so far if other considerations are met in working through issues of chaos and complexity. ~ D

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Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.


Focusing on Black Swans


Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by RandomnessThe Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


...The quest for antifragility

The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   


He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:28 PM

Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

Harry Cannon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:25 AM

Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions

Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Reductionism [is useful] in understanding and managing the world around us.     However the possibility space is now expanding to higher levels of resolution such as a focus on complex systems. Learning and tools are ratcheting in lock-step.


Via juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a handy list for referencing complexity theory in a practical way.  Many change projects reference concepts mentioned here including non-linear dynamics, networks, chaos, fractals, and power laws.  ~ Deb

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Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world

Change Management - Leading and Managing Change in a Multi-polar world | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Today's global business environment requires bold new programs to drive high performance along three dimensions: change management, leadership, and culture.

  

This may why Peter Drucker say that there is no such thing as leadership.  

  

Culture trumps leadership and change, which is why multi-polar world  (as well as VUCA world, Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambigious in another post) caught my eye.

  

Excerpts:

  

Managers face major operational challenges in a global environment....

  

Communications and business processes must take place through virtual structures—teleconferences, e-mails, videoconferencing, electronic workflows...

____________________________

  

Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally.

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...new ways of working must be explicitly detailed and incorporated into management processes and structures, and in the ways work is moved around, checked and handed off (see "A bold new look for global sourcing,” Outlook, September 2007).

  

From a legal perspective, a crazy quilt of regulatory guidelines must be attended to as well.

  

....Some countries, for example, have restrictions on where an individual’s supervisor must reside. That can be a deal breaker for a company looking to have a team in one country reporting to a manager in another.

  

...Companies that are successful in changing globally have programs that are both driven from the center and embedded locally. Companies that still rely only on local efforts or, on the other hand, try to force change only from the center, are being outperformed.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kate Crisp
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Abolishing Myths: 7 Levers to Achieve High-Performance Culture

Abolishing Myths:  7 Levers to Achieve High-Performance Culture | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Culture is hot. ...we have observed a markedly increasing emphasis on culture.   Case studies are how to achieve sustaining transformational change via  Boston Consulting Group


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Leaders ...want to know how to spark the behaviors that will deliver results during the transformation—and sustain them well beyond. 

______________________


Leaders trying to reshape their organization’s culture are asking: How can we break down silos and become more collaborative or innovative? Others, struggling to execute strategy, are wondering: How do we reconnect with our customers or adapt more proactively to the new regulatory environment?


Leaders overseeing a major transformation want to know how to spark the behaviors that will deliver results during the transformation—and sustain them well beyond.


Those involved with a postmerger integration grapple with how to align the two cultures with the new operating model—and reap the sought-after synergies.


And those simply seeking operating improvements often ask: How can we become more agile? Accelerate decision making? Embed an obsession for continuous improvement throughout the organization?


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Boston Group full article highlights a path through complexity, featuring, Corference Board style, a list of levers:  1) Leadership, 2) People and Development, 3) Performance Management, 4) Informal Interactions, 5) Organization Design, 6) Resources and Tools, 7) Values (beliefs, ideas, norms.)  


It reminds be very much of the venerable 7S McKinsey model that I've referenced for years that stands the test of time.  ~  D

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Keith Meyer's curator insight, June 12, 2013 6:23 PM

Transformational and Culture change in business have become the focus on how to keep an Organisation on top of it's game.

John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's curator insight, September 29, 2013 5:23 PM

Some great insights into why some organisations are better able to implement and leverage change better than others.

Harish Maru's curator insight, March 6, 2014 8:17 PM

Culture in an organisation reflects the values of the society. For example in India society is paternalistic. In business context it will result in limiting some person or group's liberty or autonomy for their own good.

 

How an Indian business organisation leverage this value to achieve high performance? It will be futile to go against this social norm.

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Understanding simple, complicated, complex, and chaos in Systems Thinking

" If you manage a complex organization as if it were just a complicated one, you’ll make serious, expensive mistakes.”


Most of the approaches used to address complex system are approaches for complicated system ( Six Sigma, Balance Scorecard, …).


But how to work in a complex system ?  


According to Gökçe Sargut and Rita Gunther McGrath , they recommend to:
    
· Improve the way you forecast by using tools/models that simulate the behavior of the system. Process Behaviour Chart (see Shewart)
· Improve the way you mitigate risk by minimizing the need to rely on predictions/expectations to experiment, by…
· Make different resource tradeoffs by providing diversity of thoughts and by investing in incremental and small investment in new project/approaches.



They describe some of the essential parts of " a system of profound knowledge" :
  • appreciation for a system, 
  • knowledge about variation, 
  • theory of knowledge, and 
  • psychology. 
     
The system of profound knowledge is a complex system as we've to consider it a a network of interdependent components that work together to accomplish the purpose of the system.
   
The  4 interrelated parts can't be understood if separated from one another.
     
As Deming said : "Rational prediction requires theory and builds knowledge through systematic revision and extension of the theory based on comparison of prediction with observation."(Deming, The New Economics). 
     
The system of profound knowledge is based on the premise that management is prediction.  
    
If we fail to predict what we expect  ("Theory), we fail to predict the results of our experiment to improve, we fail to analyze the results of our experiment and we fail to learn about our system.
     
So we don't improve. 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As many large change projects ARE in complex systems, dealing with forecasts (alternate scenarios included), and risk and resource allocation changes IS key to agile  & appropriate change plans.  ~  D

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Change Useful: The Cynefin Framework helps with Complexity, Complex, Chaos and Simplicity

The Cynefin (play /ˈkʌnɨvɪn/) framework is used to describe problems, situations and systems. It provides a typology of contexts that guides what sort of explanations and/or solutions may apply. Cynefin is a Welsh word, which is commonly translated into English as 'habitat' or 'place', although this fails to convey its full meaning. A more complete translation of the word would be that it conveys the sense that we all have multiple pasts of which we can only be partly aware: cultural, religious, geographic, tribal etc. The term was chosen by the Welsh scholar Dave Snowden to illustrate the evolutionary nature of complex systems, including their inherent uncertainty. The name is a reminder that all human interactions are strongly influenced and frequently determined by our experiences, both through the direct influence of personal experience, and through collective experience, such as stories or music.

The Cynefin framework draws on research into complex adaptive systems theory, cognitive science, anthropology and narrative patterns, as well as evolutionary psychology. It "explores the relationship between man, experience and context"[1] and proposes new approaches to communication, decision-making, policy-making and knowledge management in complex social environments.

The Cynefin framework was originally developed in 1999 in the context of knowledge management and organisational strategy by Dave Snowden[2] It was originally a modification of Max Boisot's I-Space[3] combined with the study of actual, as opposed to stated management practice in IBM. By 2002 it had developed to include complex adaptive systems theory and had started to become a general strategy model.[4] It was then further developed and elaborated with Cynthia Kurtz as a part of their work with the IBM Institute of Knowledge Management (IKM).[5] Kurtz had worked with Snowden as a part of an IBM special interest group on narrative from 1999 before joining the IKM in 2001)[6] Kurtz and others continued this work in Cognitive Edge formed by Snowden when he left IBM in 2005. This period included work to extend the model to Leadership with Mary E Boone which culminated in the HBR article referenced below.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Quotable, "There's nothing so practical as a good theory, " and this one in particular helps with the complexity of change.  ~  D

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This is Your Brain on Change | Contributor: Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D. - Change Management Resources

This is Your Brain on Change | Contributor: Carol Kinsey Goman, Ph.D. - Change Management Resources | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

New research suggests that those trouble-making, inflexible, change resistors are . . . all of us!

 

So what’s a change agent to do?
1. Make change familiar
2. Let people create change
3. KISS your communication    Your job is to help people make sense of complexity by condensing it into two or three critical goals they can understand and absorb.
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help people make sense of complexity by condensing it into two or three critical goals they can understand and absorb.
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4. Never underestimate the power of a vision

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