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Brain Based: 4 Factors That Distinguish Change Management Successes From Failures

Brain Based: 4 Factors That Distinguish Change Management Successes From Failures | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many MANAGEMENT GURUS, ACADEMICS and CEOs are writing on change, yet there is a difference between theory and actual change. ...When successful change occurs, employees feel like authors not objects of change. They feel fully invested, accountable and energetic about the future, regardless of challenges.


_____________________

   

Change only happens when we are engaged with others ...Only when our "brain-hardwiring changes" do we change.

_____________________



...many companies embarked on Re-engineering, Total Quality and Lean Manufacturing. However ...these approaches often failed. The energy ...was a top-down compliance approach...


Yet there were successes.   ...The key lies in understanding change from a brain-based perspective...change is a process "we" do together... 

 

Examples:


Scar 3: Change is head, heart and soul   Solution 3: Storytelling


Scar 4: Speed of change   Solution 4: Navigational Communications  ...navigating scenarios from many perspectives to arrive at practices and rituals that "we" all embrace


Photo:  by Daniele Oberti, Flickr CC


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Good, practical concepts here, including the one about, "We underestimate people's need for dialogue in order to feel comfortable regarding the new changes."  In an earlier comment, I mentioned that a change colleague said we under-communicate by a factor of 4 in change projects. ~  D

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larry costello's comment, May 15, 2014 4:11 PM
For successful change you must have engagement, there's no engagement without trust.
Brett Bearfield's comment, May 15, 2014 8:10 PM
I am not sure I fully buy into the comment that "these approaches often failed"....GE and several other companies have demonstrated progress here, I have 7 lean/black belts on my team who have been very effective in driving change in the Pharmacy. That being said, the practice (at least for us) that has proven results is getting our front line associates engaged AND ensuring that we call them by name as the people who made it possible. Good Lean professionals understand to defer the credit and watching the people grow is their reward.
Louis Fernandez MD's comment, May 15, 2014 9:46 PM
Engagement starts by giving all the stakeholders a say in how and what to change. Most of the questions that we are facing as an organization have the answers in the front lines. The associates that operationalize the work see where the inefficiencies, confusion, and barriers lay. They also have the best perspective to suggest how to improve the process. The storytelling that has been mentioned in the articles and the post is the vehicle to set change in motion and give it direction. Everyone like to listen to stories because they can inspire and motivate us. Why is it that the story developers are usually very removed from the front lines where the problem lives? Why do we have remote teams try to fix problems that they do not experience first hand? Think we need to answer these before we move on.
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Leading and sustaining a nimble organization: Interview with Daryl Conner, 2014

Leading and sustaining a nimble organization: Interview with Daryl Conner, 2014 | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Excerpted, via Gail Severrini & the Change Whisperer:

The authors of the current  Innosight study, “Creative Destruction Whips through Corporate America,” offer a warning to executives: “At the current churn rate, 75% of the S&P 500 will be replaced by 2027.”

....The Innosight study also proposes three questions that the CEO and executive committee should ask themselves. I found the second question to be arresting: “How fast do we have to change to maintain our position within our industry?”


_____________________________
   

It is about creating and sustaining an organizational DNA that views change as a constant...

_____________________________


It is about creating and sustaining an organizational DNA that views change as a constant, as part of the daily activities of leaders, managers, and employees.
     

How are Strategy Realization Offices different than conventional Project Management Offices and how an SRO can contribute to building a nimble organization?


We built the Strategy Realization Office structure to give leaders two things: oversight on their most strategic imperatives and line of sight on benefits realization.


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There is always strategic change in organizations. ...We need permanent structures to manage it. ~ Daryl Conner

______________________________


    

Conventional PMOs are assembled on project funding and adjourned on installation. This kind of timing mindset does not serve leaders who need to manage continuity of business performance all the way through to full realization of the initiative’s promise.

   

There is always strategic change in organizations. It is a fact of life now. We need permanent structures to manage it.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Whether they are called strategic focus areas or 

Strategy Realization Offices, leaders need information to help them guide their focus on their strategic imperatives and help them continually clarify their line of sight on getting to the benefits of their change promise and plans, allowing for course corrections along the way.  ~  D   

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 21, 2014 11:31 AM

Replacing  "75% of the S&P 500 ...by 2027" is a huge pointer to what our learning is and needs to be for the months and years ahead.  ~  D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:36 AM

I only wish that more companies understood that this Change Thing is a requisite for corporate survival and thriving,....but many are just too afraid to change the way they think about change, let alone manage and be a leader with it....Too bad the market punishes those companies that don't embrace it.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:27 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,
but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:


If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Harry Cannon's curator insight, August 1, 2013 10:04 AM

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation

Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How about a step beyond the change agents and focusing on the people who matter most, frontline employees and managers, in working through change transition?


Read about the study that provides a conceptual bridge from change readiness (pre-change) to change implementation (post-change).


Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


       

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More helpful scholarly work from Ron Koller on making it through the change process, from readiness to and THROUGH implementation. - Deb

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Transformational leaders and change: What's the Collective Purpose in the Process?

Transformational leaders and change:  What's the Collective Purpose in the Process? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Transformational leaders and change:  ...If your workers won't change, maybe you should.

Through their behavior, transformational leaders, foster change as an element of education, growth, experimentation, and, ultimately, change acceptance. This bears fruit in the minds of our employees: 

  • psychological freedom,
  • engagement in the thinking parts of the job, and
  • systematic organizational approval.


________________________

..It's the human touches, combined with all the formal systems that build confidence." ...be positive and avoid negativity, get to know people.


________________________


Transformational leaders are intuitive experts at motivating followers to see the collective purpose of their jobs. Understanding purpose should be a sought after identifier for members of any organization, whether the boss-types comprehend it or not.


Source:   http://t.co/kyBESMLC)    


Related articles by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Rank and yank performance metrics, "human capital" jargon, cycles of reorganization, no wonder cynicism is a continuing visitor at the performance & results table.  


The psychology of modeling the change personally to build collective purpose is worth a look.  ~  Deb

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What's the real finish line? Prosci's 2014 research report features sustainability, reinforcing actions

What's the real finish line?  Prosci's 2014 research report features sustainability, reinforcing actions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

From Prosci's Best Practices Benchmarking report - "The data is clear - organizations that are planning and resourcing for reinforcement are more likely to meet or exceed project objectives than organizations that neglect this critical step in the change process."


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Only 44% reported that resources were allocated to reinforcement and sustainment activities

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Participants in the 2013 benchmarking study were asked if reinforcement and sustainment activities were planned for as part of their projects. Sixty-one percent of participants planned for these activities.

   

Participants were also asked if project resources were allocated to the reinforcement and sustainment activities. Only 44% reported that resources were allocated to this effort.

   

Participants who allocated resources to reinforcement and sustainment activities reported greater success rates on their projects.  [Data collected] shows that 60% of participants who allocated resources to reinforcement and sustainment activities met or exceeded project objectives, compared to 53% of those who did not allocate resources to reinforcement.

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...we are often already moving on to the next change...reinforcement efforts can often fall
short.
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...reinforcement can be difficult because once a change is finished, we are often already moving on to the next change. It takes concerted effort and time to make sure a change "sticks" - and given the scarce resources and change saturation that many organizations face, reinforcement efforts can often fall short.
         
We see this scenario playing out in the data. A little more than half of organizations are planning for reinforcement and sustainment activities, but fewer than half are dedicating resources to this effort.
      
The data is clear - organizations that are planning and resourcing for reinforcement are more likely to meet or exceed project objectives than organizations that neglect this critical step in the change process.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
The race is not over when reaching the early finish line of a change project's objectives.  The second leg of the race,  is a marathon finish line that is the more important for a change to truly be fully implemented:  funding sustainment and reinforcing the change as real, "yes this is a permanent" change.  


Including resources to sustain change is often overlooked in change projects, and can becomes a part of the ubiquitous change project 70% failure rate.  

Helping people with reinforcing systems in the new behaviors is essential.  Remember the classic William Bridges model starting with endings and then the neutral zone.  Continue to provide a solid foundation for new beginnings to fully take root. 

Put another way, make sure you make it to the real finish line, with behavioral results and other people connected measures, not just the one on a project plan or in an administrators report. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 25, 2014 10:35 AM

When planning resources for a change project, it's important to include resources to sustain the change, which is often overlooked and then becomes a part of the ubiquitous change project 70% failure rate.  

The race is not over when reaching the early finish line of a change project's objectives.  There is a second leg of the race, a marathon finish line that is the more important for a change to truly be fully implemented:  funding sustainment and reinforcing the change as real, "yes this is a permanent" change.  


Helping people with reinforcing systems in the new behaviors is essential.  Remember the classic William Bridges model starting with endings and then the neutral zone.  Continue to provide a solid foundation for new beginnings to fully take root.

Put another way, make sure you make it to the real finish line, with behavioral results and other people connected measures, not just the one on a project plan or in an administrators report. ~ D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:54 PM

Is this obvious?  According to the research, it is not! ~ D

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A Change Audit Reveals Blind Spots in Failing Change Initiatives

A Change Audit Reveals Blind Spots in Failing Change Initiatives | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Often feedback from teams via a “Change Audit” surprises the change leader who's dream is brutally subjected to a reality check of the gap between his teams’ actual involvement in the change and his perception of their participation.


How does a change leader become the victim of such “blindness?” 


Excerpted Reasons  (underlined items mine - DN):

 

1) The “organisation-focused” change leader - caught up in complex organisation diagrams – clutters of circles and rectangles – which he juggles in search of the best combination.

_________________
   
...the change leader, had not looked back...the engine had forged ahead under full steam, all alone.

     

_________________
    
 

…This manager’s collaborators had not followed him. They had allowed him to go off on his own, without really understanding him, ...And he, the change leader, had not looked back. He had failed to check – on a regular basis – whether the train cars of change were properly hitched to the engine. And the engine had forged ahead under full steam, all alone.


2) The “speeder” change leader [In one case]…driven by a powerful urge to conquer - the “Change Audit” immediately triggered his fury, so great was the gap it revealed between the positions of his closest collaborators and his own dynamism.
       

3) The “autistic” change leader Top Management …had failed to create confidence in it. …The best way to do that is to connect them solidly through real, effective and complete communication, from top to bottom and from bottom to top, involving all those concerned with the change.

   

Read the ToolBook full post here.
    
 

Related posts & tools by Deb:

     

     
    
     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As posted in an earlier Scoop on this stream, communication in change initiatives is usually under-resourced by a factor of four.  With this change audit approach, there is an opportunity to reconnect the cars on the change train.

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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.
________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  

I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I found Ron's chart very direct, humorous and a bit sobering.  How does it match your change project stories?  ~  Deb

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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 3:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 10:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb

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With the Zombies? Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey

With the Zombies?  Choices in the Change Practitioner’s Journey | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is the first story in a series featuring Sara taking the path many seasoned change practitioners (Daryl Conner's intended audience) follow as they come to terms with how they work with clients.  It kicks off a provocative, insightful series. 


The basic storyline: 


The hero pursues a series of adventures that takes her beyond the safety of her ordinary life in order to learn some vital lessons important to her and others.


In the process of her odyssey, she leaves her status quo, evolves into a wiser person, and returns to share her insights with those who could benefit.


....Sara had become “comfortably numb” without ever knowing what happened.

 

Sample questions:


  • Have you heard a wakeup call but been reluctant to heed the implications?


  • To what degree has victimization played a part in any disillusionment you feel (or have felt) about your change work?


  • To what degree has sovereignty played a part in avoiding or recovering from being a zombie practitioner?
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I zombie-photo-bombed this update ~ just to have some fun with the serious side of change initiatives that tend fall into that 70%+ failure rate abyss.


This is a helpful series from one of the founders of Change Management, Daryl Conner, who writes about what it takes to be alive in the change practitioner's role, considering to what you say "yes"  and to what you say "no" - especially before you become "zombiefied" or perhaps to bring you back from the dead. ~  Deb


Related posts by Deb:

 

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Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes

Change Management vs. Change Leadership -- What's the Difference? | John Kotter & Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

John Kotter, one of the top authors & researchers in the field of change scholarship, talks about the difference between change management and change leadership.


John Kotter's defines, "change leadership, ....[as]  the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation."


Add in Dr. Mary Lippitt's "Managing Complex Change" model, and Daryl Conner's classic Change Curve you've got some great expertise regarding how change works.

 

______________________________


   ...change leadership... —it’s an engine  ...it's about urgency. It’s ...about masses of people who want to make something happen.   ______________________________


Excerpts:

 

Change management, which is the term most everyone uses, refers to a set of basic tools or structures intended to keep any change effort under control. The goal is often to minimize the distractions and impacts of the change.

 

John Kotter Video:  http://vimeo.com/20000373


Change leadership, on the other hand, concerns the driving forces, visions and processes that fuel large-scale transformation.

 

...Change leadership is much more associated with putting an engine on the whole change process, and making it go faster, smarter, more efficiently. It’s more associated, therefore, with large scale changes.

 

Change management tends to be more associated—at least, when it works well—with smaller changes.

 

...change leadership... —it’s an engine. It’s more about urgency. It’s more about masses of people who want to make something happen.

 

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Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control.   ...you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

______________________________


It’s more about big visions.

It’s more about empowering lots and lots of people.

 

Change leadership has the potential to get things a little bit out of control. You don’t have the same degree of making sure that everything happens in a way you want at a time you want when you have the 1,000 horsepower engine.

 

What you want to do, of course, is have a highly skilled driver and a heck of a car, which will make sure your risks are minimum.

 

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