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Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change

Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is a useful collection of webinars, handouts and materials from thought leaders via Nexus 4 Change.  Examples:

  • Whole System Transformation, A Fireside Chat with Harrison Owen (Open Space Technology), 
  • Future Search 
  • and more.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I attended the insightful and affirming webinar with Harrison Owen.   There is much to mine here.  Great resource!  ~  Deb

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Six (6) Steps for Implementing Agile Across the Organization from Lessons Learned

Six (6) Steps for Implementing Agile Across the Organization from Lessons Learned | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"After facing difficulties attempting to transform a group of twelve skilled people into a self-organized agile team, Ove Holmberg learned some valuable lessons on what it takes to implement agile within an organization."


Excerpts:

1. Decide if Agile Is Right for Your Organization
The agile mentor is one tool for building up this knowledge if you are not sure or need facts or success stories to support your approach.


The agile mentor...builds up your confidence as an agile manager and helps you take small agile steps toward your self-organized team and your new role as an agile manager.  ...(Get) an agile mentor early on in the project. 

2. Get Managers’ Buy-in with Data
The State of Agile Development Survey 2010 (Version One) states that the top two reasons for companies not fully adopting agile methods are: “management opposed to change” and “loss of management control.”  

3. Get an Excited Team; Get Rid of the Slackers
...I should have formed my new team. ...I discovered the biggest defect in agile: It is assumed that people, by default, are skilled, disciplined, and willing to self-organize. The real world isn’t so.  

    

Related posts by Deb:

     
      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Hindsight in Agile implementation tends to be a valuable change management resource or any similar change. ~ D

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Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results

Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions."


Diversity and T shaped people


Excerpted, Paraphrased:


Working on innovation requires experience of team members and of their leadership mainly when where the combination of various disciplines is an unquestionable necessity such in the area of health.
 

Take:

  

  • People with different backgrounds and experiences who are also experts in a specific area?
   
  • To collaborate ...gather forces in two dimensions:


Plot out:


  • The vertical axis, each team member is able to answer questions specific of a discipline or area of work.
    
  • The horizontal axis ~ the ability to generate empathy and move through a common language. 

   
This is translated into opening, in curiosity, optimism, a tendency to learn by doing, and for experimentation => Those are “T” shaped people. 

  
Those are able to show a desired future, and build a path for its accomplishment.

   

...Management consultants long ago realized that only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions.

   

McKinsey and Company came up with the idea of hiring what they termed ‘T-shaped’ people.


People with deep analytical skills (the vertical stroke of the T) but also broad empathy toward those other skills and disciplines encountered in business (the horizontal stroke of the T).


These highly adaptable, rapid learners turned out to be ideal management consultants.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The "T” shaped = "highly adaptable, rapid learners" which sounds like aspects of the characteristics of agile learning to me, an asset to change facilitators & project leaders.  ~  Deb


More here:


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Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks

Agile Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through the Sharp Rocks | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
You’ve probably experienced it, that uncomfortable feeling of letting go of something tried and formerly true without knowing what is coming next. Welcome to the Neutral Zone, coined by chang...


For now, consider that the middle state of letting go to enter the Neutral Zoneincludes building improved learning agility, a developmental process as we:


1) UnLearnlet go and prepare to accept something new,

2) Adapt, pilot and test new thinking and behaviors, and

3) Demonstrate New Learning (accept and refine new behaviors.)


A great metaphor for developing agility in learning can be found in rediscovering, and perhaps fully clarifying former misunderstanding of the classic change management research of Kurt Lewin. With credit to researcher Ron Koller, Lewin’s more nuanced, elegant original change work is diagrammed below.  His work has been oversimplified over the years as simply:  


1) Unfreeze,

2) Moving (Change), and

3) Refreeze2 (into the new state. )


See the full diagram of Lewin's original interrupted time series design in the full post here as well as what is key from Lewin and other change research.


Photo credit:   VinothChandar

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts in which I have the delight of uncovering a deeper, clearer understanding of the original change work of Kurt Lewin, as well as offering a Learning Agility perspective connected to current stories, Bob Johansen's VUCA perspective and Bridge's classic transitions work (a two-parter.)  


Thanks for stopping by!  ~  Deb

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Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser

Change Management Basics with an Agile Project Management chaser | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

The classics of change management are here, featuring Lewin, as well as Agile project management and risks.

   

Excerpts:

  

Lewin’s change management model depicts three phases that apply to any change.

  

  1. Unfreeze, which means removing the constraints and generate the will to change. 
  2. The change itself, where people reposition themselves according to the new objectives. 
  3. Refreeze, where the new situation becomes stable.


Kotter’s 8-step change model is also listed. The article highlights:
Steps 1-to-5 fit into the “unfreeze” phase, steps 6 and 7 correspond to the “change” itself, and step 8 corresponds to the “refreeze” phase of Lewin’s model.


By Dr. John Kotter:

  1. Create urgency
  2. Form a coalition
  3. Create a vision for change
  4. Communicate the vision
  5. Remove obstacles
  6. Create short-term wins
  7. Build on the change
  8. Anchor the change


_______________________________


The change curve...shows that [a] main objective... is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.

_______________________________



Change management also deals with people’s stress and the temporary negative effect of change.  What helps with change stress?

   

  • Guarantee job stability for a period of time long enough for them to learn the new skills and settle in their new roles.
  • Increase tolerance to mistakes and decreased efficiency during a period of time.
  • Emphasize that this is a chance to develop new, more marketable skills.


The change curve (see Daryl Conner's work especially) pictures the negative impact of change across time.  It shows that one of the main objectives of change management is to reduce negative effect during transition and to shorten the time needed to reach a new equilibrium.


_______________________________

   

Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects

_______________________________

    


Setting Up a Project to Manage Change

Many changes are carried in operational mode, which tends to be chaotic because it doesn’t explicitly address concerns such as cost management, quality management, schedule management, procurement, etc,

    

By balancing discipline and flexibility appropriately, Agile project management is well suited to deal with transformation projects.

      

  • The most critical area is risk management.
  • In project management, risks are “known unknowns”, identified areas of uncertainty to manage. 
  • “Unknown unknowns”,  means risks not yet identified yet. 


    

The full article is here:  http://t.co/ADKBgl3v...)...

    

Companion, relevant articles by Deb are here:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Lewis is a bedrock source when looking for the origins of change management.  Adding agile project management adds perspectives on types of change as well.

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Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples

Cure Your Company's Allergy to Change, Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield Examples | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"The HBR post cites several case studies illustrating why many transformations fizzle, then two examples for how to turn it around."


The cautionary tales, names removed, are listed first.  Then the positive stories follow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


______________________

   

But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.

______________________


A health insurer demonstrates a repeated pattern of 3- to 5-year cycles where it launches a change program, takes awhile for managers to get behind it, and then more time to get it funded. A program gets funded for a year but then everyone loses interest, and it gets defunded and dies.


Recently they're failing faster; the three- to five-year cycle is moving to two to three years. But they're not failing fast to learn. They're just failing more. It's definitely not a learning organization.


Just about everyone in the company agrees the culture is dysfunctional:

   

  • Some point to politics - competition between the COO and CFO blocking each other's progress. 
  • The CEO also had a way of questioning and stress-testing people that discouraged risk-taking => a "play it safe" mentality.
  • Executives who want quick wins scope projects to be done in a year. Most change programs there needed multiple years, so by the time a program extends beyond year one, executives move onto a new initiative.


What countermeasures are there to break a tragic change cycle like this?


______________________

   

Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts.

______________________


Successful efforts at health insurance companies Aetna and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan offer insights:


Organizational realignment — The structure of an organization determines the incentives that drive identity, behavior, and employee understanding of roles and responsibilities and priorities, as well as a sense of ownership and accountability.


Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's tried a more traditional functional management structure but then found it lost customer focus.

  

  • It appointed leaders to run market segments with profit and loss responsibility with the focus of changing the product mix and improve profitability. 
  • By organizing by customer, cross-functional changes became much easier to implement, and there was a dramatic turnaround in business results.
   

Improvement methods — a platform for doing work nimbly and at low cost included:

  

  • Adopting improvement methods such as "agile" or "lean" can change the culture as employees are empowered  so that results and trust are prized over process and contracts. 
  • Tactics such as daily huddles drove immediate wins and helped entrench a culture of empowerment.


Employee engagement — Employees fundamentally want themselves and the company to be successful, so successful change agents listen to their needs and help them transition.


Aetna describes how new CEO John Rowe and the senior team "sought out employees at all levels — those who were well connected, sensitive to the company culture, and widely respected — to get their input on the strategy, design and execution of intended process changes."


Executives at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan went into the field to gather input and communicate their commitment to change. Employees were trained in improvement methods ("Lean"), with every employee going through two sessions in accountability training.


Curator: Enrich your perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing.


Contact Deb Nystrom here for an initial consultation, without obligation.

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Harry Cannon's comment, November 1, 2012 11:30 AM
See article in HBR Jul-Aug 2012 by Katzenback et al.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 3, 2012 8:10 PM
Thanks Harry. I appreciate the link.
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Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.


Focusing on Black Swans


Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by RandomnessThe Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


...The quest for antifragility

The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   


He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


Related posts by Deb:


   

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 8, 2013 2:28 PM

Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

Harry Cannon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:25 AM

Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.

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Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work

Got a Metrics Fetish? Welcome to Alienation of Work | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Karl Marx created very sophisticated theories of labor value already in 19th century. His view was that capitalistic system will lead to alienation of work. Of course his writings reflected his time..." 

____________________

...Specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen.

____________________


Excerpts from the post:  


As the company grows and more people are joining in the cooperative processes of product-making, only option to grow is the work division, specialization.




This is needed because of two things: 

  • first of all there are new skills that are needed, 
  • secondly people need to have time to grow their expertise on these matters. 
[It is] specialization” ...It is the only thing that can happen. There will be different functions like marketing, R & D, logistics > inside these functions there are further divisions...

The diagram on this post is of how a software organization might look like from the point of view of alienation.

____________________

Alienation means less dependence to the actual results of the work and more dependence on the abstract knowledge.

____________________

Click the post title to read the full post.

Related posts by Deb:
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 3:41 PM

"It is curious how often you humans manage to obtain that which you do not want."    ~ Spock in 'Errand of Mercy'


Cultural factors and practices, including possible Organization Development (OD) activities like Open Space and Whole Scale Change conferences may help organizations regain creativity and connection to vision and meaning **WITH** metrics. Some companies can do it and hold on to the alignment. 

Many have it for awhile, then lose it. SouthWest Airlines, for example, has been touted recently as perhaps losing sight of what has made them so unique and resilient in a VERY tough industry.
 

Steelcase, a 100+ year company, continues to reinvent and renew itself. Building something tangible and taking pride in it is probably a major factor, no matter what your role is in the company. Working in the finance industry, being distanced through numbers in ways more than in a typical company, perhaps not so much, being able to grab ahold of the meaning and hold on.   ~ Deb

PS:  I've listed this post on Change Management Resources as well.

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6 People You Need in Your Corner For a Great Team for Change - Forbes

6 People You Need in Your Corner For a Great Team for Change - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Nothing incredible is accomplished alone. You need others to help you, and you need to help others.

  

With the right team, you can form a web of connections to make the seemingly impossible practically inevitable."

  

Her post on leadership team roles includes the roles of the:

   

  • Instigator, (pictured)
  • Doubter,  (Awareness, Problems, "The first step to a solid strategy)
  • Example,  (Been there, done that, Knowledge)

    

as well as the:

  • Cheerleader,
  • Taskmaster, and the
  • Connector.
  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

For any change project, when using an advisory, transition and/or implementation team, who's on it and their ability to shift perspectives & deal with complexity makes all the difference. 


Diverse strengths in team members has been central to what I've seen in project implementation success in over 20 years of facilitation work.


For team growth, I suggest the MCG > Membership, Control & Goal series > which includes a post on Belbin (TM) team roles:


   
   

 

~ Deb


PS:  In my @Agile_Change twitter stream today, "I'll take a great team over a great individual anyday - in sports and in business. #leadership" from @DarrenHudach.    Oh yeah.


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Classic to New: Learning Agility is Change Mastery

Classic to New:  Learning Agility is Change Mastery | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
“Learning Agility, which has four dimensions—Mental Agility, People Agility, Results Agility and Change Agility—is a key to unlocking our change proficiency.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In reading through the change research of a colleague, this approach resonates, especially cultivating the ability to be a combination of a data nerd (listener), synthesizer, developer of self & others and master communicator.  These relate well to change proficiencies touted by this author.  ~  D

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Paul Thoresen's curator insight, December 30, 2012 3:59 PM
"Classic to New: Learning Agility is Change Mastery"
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:43 PM
@Paul, thanks for the share.
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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."


Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb


Excerpts:


Elaine Rumboll suggests:


  1. Adaptability
  2. Back Up
  3. Curiosity
  4. Diversity
  5. Ease of Access
  6. Foresight
  7. Grace in Failure
  8. Hubs
  9. Inclusiveness


The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:


  • be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected
  • create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction
  • build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react
  • [let go of] things remaining stable


Read the full article here.


Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous

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IT, Agile & Change Management: Four Cs for Success

IT, Agile & Change Management: Four Cs for Success | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"IT offers a seasoned perspective on both agility & change due to the volatile, fast moving nature of their field, including this CIO view on successful change Cs."
 

The author offers that IT is the lynchpin for crucial business change.  IT has also been labeled the accelerator of successful change.  


Consider the role of IT in facilitating growth in emerging markets (social media, analysis), adapting more agile business models [from IT we have agile as a business structure for projects), or helping with our increased dependence on collaborative, globally dispersed teams (Skype, WebEx, Google+ hangout meetings, anyone?)  ~ Deb

  

____________________________

   

People won’t commit to “a good idea.”  ...People who have a “why” will accomplish almost any “how.”

____________________________


Excerpted:  Four Secrets to Success - Commitment, Community, Clarity & Communication

   

1. Commitment. ...the single most important reason why CIOs cannot sustain change.

   

  • being bound emotionally and intellectually to a course of action 
  • [NOT] mere “compliance” -- people going along with a mandatory recommendation or new process without really believing in it
  • people ...believe in what they’re doing and are intent on completing the journey.
  • people have to make that jump themselves, even while their natural instincts scream at them to resist. 
  • invite discussion and dissent, air these misgivings and steer the negative emotions into positive ones.
   

2. Community   ...requires different people collaborating in diverse roles to purposefully drive change forward, leaving nothing to chance.   Key roles include: a change leader, change agents & advocates.

  

3. Clarity. People won’t commit to “a good idea” -- they need to understand why the change is necessary and why the current state is no longer viable. People who have a “why” will accomplish almost any “how.”   (For a good change model on this, see the DVF>R here.)

  

____________________________

   

...invite discussion and dissent, air these misgivings and steer the negative emotions into positive ones.

____________________________



4. Communication...the glue that holds the entire change initiative together. [This is more than] sending an e-mail, holding a town hall meeting or conducting a presentation. [Some also include] two-way methods, such as small-group meetings and facilitated Q&As.

   

Inspiring change requires more ...creating opportunities for groups to voice their concerns, bringing obstacles to light...and training, coaching and providing feedback, as well as opportunities for practice and learning.


...some IT teams now anticipate stakeholder needs rather than just respond to them; help reshape business strategy rather than just support it; and consult on business process improvements rather than just provide system upgrades.


The full article is here.  Author, Dan Roberts is the CEO and President of Ouellette & Associates and contributing author of the book "Unleashing the Power of IT," which profiles the successful change initiatives of three CIOs and their staffs.  


For more about Deb & her work with change, visit Deb's homepage REVELN here.


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