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What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

   


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 8:31 AM

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

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See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools
     

      

      

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Holacracies, wirearchies and simply feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change.  It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations already committing to it, like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

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Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 17, 2:23 PM

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes

Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

'Antifragile' is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility.

Many readers misunderstand Taleb’s core message.  They assume that because Taleb writes about unseen and improperly calculated risks, his objective must be to reduce or eliminate risk.  Nothing could be further from the truth. 


Antifragile is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility. 


Rather than reduce risk, organize your life, your business or your society in such a way that it benefits from randomness and the occasional Black Swan event.


Taleb’s own life is a case in point.  He had the free time to write Fooled, The Black Swan and Antifragile because—in his own words—he made “F___ you money” during the greatest Black Swan event of our lifetimes, the 1987 stock market crash.  


...Taleb’s trading style is antifragile, had the 1987 crash never happened, Taleb would not have been materially hurt.  His trading style puts little at risk but allows for outsized returns.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Taleb's coinage of "Antifragile" is compelling.  Change practitioners might find this a useful concept to understanding how to survive and thrive in a VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous) world.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 17, 2013 2:57 PM
Anne, your layering encourages critical nuanced views beyond the book's "shiny new term" idea. Sometimes the first thing to do is "not do," as in, don't just do something, stand there. Doe we need an "intervention?" What are the other perspectives available, thinking systemically? Re: Iatrogenics: From the "Black Swan Report: "...the argument of Chapters 21 and 22 on the convexity of iatrogenics (only treat the VERY ill): Mortality is convex to blood pressure."
Anne Caspari's comment, April 22, 2013 9:42 AM
Hi Deb, thanks :-). I also reckon there are MANY fresh perspectives on how to handle different systems (or leave them alone), may they be health, financial, socio-political, ecological.... I love it and keep smiling to myself when I see the aha - moments on applied convexity/anti/fragility pop up in daily life, business and otherwise... compliments also on your scoops...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 22, 2013 10:16 PM
Thanks Anne. Systems and org. groupies a bit, maybe. ;-)
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Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

While we often look to one hierarchical leader to guide us through difficult changes, in business and in public life, this may not be what is most effective.


__________________________
 
...shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change....
even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 

__________________________



In cases where a large scale strategic or transformative change needs to occur, leadership responsibilities need to shift and often become shared between various individuals or groups. 


Professor Duin and forum participants all shared personal cases where singular leadership was misaligned with the needs of the organization and shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change that would be by all the parties involved.   
This type of buy-in is often needed in the University setting, even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 


Whether restructuring colleges and departments to be a more competitive and well aligned university to developing ways for various technology centers to work together to delineate responsibilities, meet the needs of users, and continue evolving with the fast pace of new technology offerings, developing inroads for collaborative co-leadership is key to making broad innovative changes. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.    

      

    

     

        
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a reminder of the basics of change, from a higher education perspective.  It's interesting to see the siloed, bridged and shared scope definitions, appropriate to the hierarchies natural to higher education. 

In my own hometown, we have a new president about to begin, along the task of filling key, top-level vacancies in administration. Professor Ann Hill Duin, University of Minnesota has shared forum perspectives on change in academe, particularly what works, and what does not work.   ~  Deb

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, July 19, 3:15 AM

Une bonne synthèse des divers types de changements...

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Beyond Resilience, Building Anti-Fragile Organizations, REVELN

It is about resilience? Or is it about learning how to be Anti-Fragile, a term coined by Nassim Taleb to describe natural or organic systems, things that need some dose of disorder in order to develop.


For example, deprive your bones of stress and they become brittle. Are our HR and organizational system destined to decline, are exist in a mediocre state due to their structure? 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own slide share for a recent presentation on change, adapting using both Nassim N. Taleb's "Anti-Fragile" concepts and Adam Grant's work on Givers, Matchers and Takers.   The full blog post here here:


Thanks for visiting.  I'm curious on what you think of these combinations of concepts.  Comments welcome!  ~  Deb

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