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Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead

Shared Leadership and the University - Approaches to Change, Time to Lead | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

While we often look to one hierarchical leader to guide us through difficult changes, in business and in public life, this may not be what is most effective.


__________________________
 
...shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change....
even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 

__________________________



In cases where a large scale strategic or transformative change needs to occur, leadership responsibilities need to shift and often become shared between various individuals or groups. 


Professor Duin and forum participants all shared personal cases where singular leadership was misaligned with the needs of the organization and shared leadership strategies, though messy, were more effective in establishing change that would be by all the parties involved.   
This type of buy-in is often needed in the University setting, even though the academy leans strongly towards hierarchical leadership reliance. 


Whether restructuring colleges and departments to be a more competitive and well aligned university to developing ways for various technology centers to work together to delineate responsibilities, meet the needs of users, and continue evolving with the fast pace of new technology offerings, developing inroads for collaborative co-leadership is key to making broad innovative changes. 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a reminder of the basics of change, from a higher education perspective.  It's interesting to see the siloed, bridged and shared scope definitions, appropriate to the hierarchies natural to higher education. 

In my own hometown, we have a new president about to begin, along the task of filling key, top-level vacancies in administration. Professor Ann Hill Duin, University of Minnesota has shared forum perspectives on change in academe, particularly what works, and what does not work.   ~  Deb

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, July 19, 3:15 AM

Une bonne synthèse des divers types de changements...

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The Eight Super-Adaptable Life Forms That Rule Our Planet

The Eight Super-Adaptable Life Forms That Rule Our Planet | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
As the most intelligent and technologically advanced species on Earth, we humans like to think that we own the place. But evolutionary success can be measured any number of ways. As evolutionary biologist Stephen G.


Take a look at the ants, #3:

Their evolutionary success has been attributed to their highly coordinated social organization, an ability to modify habitats, exploit resources, and defend themselves.

 

Nearly 12,500 species have been identified, but it's thought that as many as 22,000 species may actually exist.

 

Ants have also colonized virtually every landmass on Earth, and may comprise anywhere from 15 to 25% of the total terrestrial animal biomass. Put another way,  ~ there are more ants on this planet by weight than all humans combined.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These top 8 Life Forms have something "anti-fragile" about them, particularly #3, the ants, considered a super-organism because of their " hive-mind composition.  


I think there are take-aways here that can help any change project.  ~  Deb

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The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices

The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails - Best vs. Agile Next Practices | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Don’t train leaders, coach them, mentor them, disciple them, and develop them, but please don’t attempt to train them. " 

  

_____________

  
Training is transactional – Development is transformational."

_________________

  

Excerpts:  

  

A 20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development:

     

1. Training blends to a norm – Development occurs beyond the norm.

  

2. Training focuses on technique/content/curriculum – Development focuses on people.

  

4. Training focuses on the present – Development focuses on the future.

  

6. Training is transactional – Development is transformational.

  

More here:  'http://t.co/vcn5rSxa


More about leaders and being strategically & learning agile is here:




Via Susan Bainbridge
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How does real leadership development happen?  Through development.  The authors  20 item list  point out  main differences between training and development.  Training is convenient and can reach many people, but only development make the grade in agiiity for adapting to change.


This article also reminds me of the limitations of ADDIE, a training design approach still used in many companies. By the time leadership training gets there (after design), there isn't there anymore.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, May 22, 2013 11:58 AM
Wow, did this hit a nerve. Great!
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Web over Wheels: Change in Trends, Connectivity rules as "Manager Knows Best" era is ending

Web over Wheels:  Change in Trends, Connectivity rules as "Manager Knows Best" era is ending | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
To get a glimpse of what tomorrow's young global managers might be like as leaders, take a look at how today's young people think about communications.


A sign of a helpful, trusted advisor is to ask smart questions.  This article does that.

The trends, surveys mentioned are also harbingers of the need for highly adaptable, flexible approaches to managing and leading in an era of continuous change.


Excerpted, HBR blogs, Sujai Hajela, VP & general manager of the Wireless Networking Business Unit at Cisco:


Today's young people are devoted to connectivity.

In a recent survey of more than 2,800 college students and young professionals in 14 countries, Cisco found that more than half said they could not live without the internet, and if forced to choose, two-thirds would opt to have the internet rather than a car.


Companies will need to ask these hard questions:

  • What is the appropriate level of openness? Should employees be prevented from slamming their bosses' ideas, for example?
  • How much blurring of public and private life is too much?
  • Social media encourages people to mix work- and nonwork-related communication, but some workers prefer to keep their social lives strictly off-limits.
  • How can the company prevent abuse of social media?  (DN: Or mitigate, educate to help prevent abuse.)
  • Do employees understand what information is confidential and what is public?



As companies resolve these issues, management styles will evolve.


Managers will no longer be able to communicate with just a small circle of trusted advisers — they'll be expected to interact digitally with a much broader range of people both inside and outside the company.



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Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals: Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur

Mount Everest Shows the Danger Of Clinging To Goals:  Embrace Uncertainty Like An Entrepreneur | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

In 1996 a disaster of historic proportion happened on the peak of Mount Everest. In the entire climbing season, 15 climbers died. Eight of those deaths took place on a single day."


____________________


In the corporate world we’re often focused on achieving our goals at all costs. This eventually reaches the status of dogma.

____________________
     


Journalist and mountain climber Jon Krakauer captured this story in his book “Into Thin Air;” he was on the mountain that day.
    
Krakauer puts part of the blame on the stubbornness of a climbing guide. While there is some evidence to support this claim, most climbers are, by definition, stubborn and arrogant. Yet disasters of this magnitude are rare. 
    
...
In this case the teams encountered a traffic jam at Hilary pass that slowed progression, and disregarded their turnaround time.   ...Members, however, continued on reaching the summit   ...Doug Hansen, a postal service worker from the New Zealand group, was the last to summit. While he made it to the top, the odds were against him ever coming back.

Like seven others, he died on the descent. 

     

...What would it look like to embrace uncertainty?

      

____________________
   
Start with your means.  Don't wait for the perfect opportunity.
   
____________________
      
    

Professor Saras Sarasvathy interviewed forty-five “successful” entrepreneurs and found a disconnect between our thoughts on entrepreneurs as successfully pursuing a goal-oriented approach and reality.

    

"An entrepreneur's ...precise endpoint was often mysterious to them, and their means of proceeding reflected this. Overwhelmingly, they scoffed at the goals-first doctrine of Locke and Latham. Almost none of them suggested creating a detailed business plan or doing comprehensive market research to hone the details of the product they were aiming to release."

  

The most valuable skill of a successful entrepreneur...[is] the ability to adopt an unconventional approach to learning: an improvisational flexibility  [including] a willingness to change the destination itself, [using] a set of principles she calls “effectuation.”

      

 “Start with your means. Don’t wait for the perfect opportunity. Start taking action, based on what you have readily available: what you are, what you know and who you know.”

     

A second is the “principle of affordable loss”  ...— ask how big the loss would be if you failed. So long as it would be tolerable, that’s all you need to know. Take that next step, and see what happens.

        

“The quest for certainty blocks the search for meaning,” argued the social psychologist Erich Fromm. “Uncertainty is the very condition to impel man to unfold his powers.” Uncertainty is where things happen. It is where the opportunities — for success, for happiness, for really living — are waiting.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  


_______________________
   
“A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at.”  

~ Bruce Lee
_______________________

    

    


This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  


~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 25, 2:18 PM

As one who faithfully taught purpose, goals and work planning since the 90s, I've learned to revise my thinking post 9-11, in a global, "anti-fragile" (Taleb) age, embracing a different approach to adaptive change.  Now, it is especially important to think like an entrepreneur, to embrace uncertainty, and to get clear about how goals can also be a trap.  
    
This piece illustrates the deadly side of goal-setting, and features one of my favorite entrepreneurial professors, Dr. Saras Saravathy - who has the research goods on how to embrace uncertainty, a bias for action, and how pushing through failure helps create entrepreneurial success.

    
Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that can help all of us let go of the industrial age rigidity.  Note that GM is mentioned in the article.   It's worth pondering for what you might choose to do differently, tolerating a certain amount of uncertainty, in your own life, tonight and tomorrow.  


~  Deb 

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Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results

Agile Empathy of the Experts Turbocharge Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration => Results | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions."


Diversity and T shaped people


Excerpted, Paraphrased:


Working on innovation requires experience of team members and of their leadership mainly when where the combination of various disciplines is an unquestionable necessity such in the area of health.
 

Take:

  

  • People with different backgrounds and experiences who are also experts in a specific area?
   
  • To collaborate ...gather forces in two dimensions:


Plot out:


  • The vertical axis, each team member is able to answer questions specific of a discipline or area of work.
    
  • The horizontal axis ~ the ability to generate empathy and move through a common language. 

   
This is translated into opening, in curiosity, optimism, a tendency to learn by doing, and for experimentation => Those are “T” shaped people. 

  
Those are able to show a desired future, and build a path for its accomplishment.

   

...Management consultants long ago realized that only certain kinds of people thrived in the unpredictable world where clients might ask an almost infinite set of questions.

   

McKinsey and Company came up with the idea of hiring what they termed ‘T-shaped’ people.


People with deep analytical skills (the vertical stroke of the T) but also broad empathy toward those other skills and disciplines encountered in business (the horizontal stroke of the T).


These highly adaptable, rapid learners turned out to be ideal management consultants.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The "T” shaped = "highly adaptable, rapid learners" which sounds like aspects of the characteristics of agile learning to me, an asset to change facilitators & project leaders.  ~  Deb


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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."


Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb


Excerpts:


Elaine Rumboll suggests:


  1. Adaptability
  2. Back Up
  3. Curiosity
  4. Diversity
  5. Ease of Access
  6. Foresight
  7. Grace in Failure
  8. Hubs
  9. Inclusiveness


The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:


  • be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected
  • create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction
  • build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react
  • [let go of] things remaining stable


Read the full article here.


Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous

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