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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,
but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:


If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 7:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Harry Cannon's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:04 AM

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

  • take a break from their normal day jobs
  • creatively solve problems and drive change
  • Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents
  • agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition
  • knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs
  • collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth
  • evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization
  • serves for a period of one year
   

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.

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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.
________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  

I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I found Ron's chart very direct, humorous and a bit sobering.  How does it match your change project stories?  ~  Deb

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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 12:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 7:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 8:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb