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Will 2014 Be Different? 2013 Study - 75% Change Failure Rate continues #Infographic

Will 2014 Be Different?  2013 Study - 75% Change Failure Rate continues #Infographic | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

 

Related tools by Deb:

     

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Another post from change scholar and Aon - Hewitt consultant Ron Koller.  Ron is also offering a change survey / audit for a collaborator organization with at least 500 participants for a pre-mid-post change survey, at NO cost. Ask me for more info if needed.  He has stellar references.  More info here:  http://www.changestudy.com/

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 9:23 PM

What change leaders need to get right:   Focus your training and tools on helping managers and keeping the message consistent and fully communicated throughout the organization.  ~  D

BhanuNagender's curator insight, February 13, 10:58 PM

Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 18, 3:54 PM

This is an helpful infographic for perspective in Agile Learning as well it's original location on ScoopIt:  Change Management Resources.  ~  D

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Why Change Management Research Fails, Moving the Cheese Perspective

Why Change Management Research Fails, Moving the Cheese Perspective | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Personality gets all the headlines while context [for change]  is ignored."


...The challenge is that the researcher needs to define (bound) the change.  By defining the change, the researcher limits the amount of people he or she can send the survey to.  Researching a particular change, rather than change in a general sense, is not without its own set of challenges, but that is for another post.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/10/why-change-management-research-sucks.html#sthash.xkvnrn6g.dpuf


Related posts by Deb:
     

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems   

          

Two Tried & True Change Models – Evergreen for Agile Change

        

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Getting the type of change right, as well as knowing the right questions to ask, is a part of increasing the liklihood of success in planning and adjusting to change along the way.  ~  Deb

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Top Speakers in OD Change Management this Weekend, Benedictine University

Top Speakers in OD Change Management this Weekend, Benedictine University | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Speakers include:


  • David L. Cooperrider, Ph.D.,  the Fairmount Minerals Professor for Social Entrepreneurship at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University
    
  • W. Warner Burke, Ph.D.,  the Edward Lee Thorndike Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University

     

  • Janine Waclawski, Ph.D., vice president of human resources for PepsiCo’s commercial and corporate functions

    

  • Dalitso Sulamoyo, Ph.D., the president and CEO of the Illinois Association of Community Action Agencies, a membership organization of 40 nonprofits and public entities that serve communities and economically challenged citizens of Illinois.



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's good to see who's on the list for this event in Illinois and what it implies for OD and Change Management.  ~  Deb

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Change Warriors: They Master Four Solutions

Change Warriors: They Master Four Solutions | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Many management gurus, academics, and CEOs are writing on change, yet there is a difference between the theoretical and academic, and actual change


...top-down compliance approach[es], where the senior team determines the new direction, strategies and mission. In some cases, after much effort, leaders give up or lose energy.

Some even find that people are more disillusioned than before.

Yet there are successes -- when leaders become 
Change Warriors and not Change Worriers.


Related posts by Deb:

   
    




Via the Change Samurai
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Where does the academic meet the practical? This  is a helpful summary on getting past traditional change barriers and includes co-creation as a key element. ~  Deb

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Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change

Kotter Change Communication Gap > One-Way Traffic Doesn't Motivate Change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

For the past 20 years, corporate communication specialists have tried as hard as they can to tailor the message to the frontline... Unfortunately, this violates the Platinum Rule of Organizational Change:


Change is a threat when done to me,
but an opportunity when done by me.


Managers often say, "but when I get everyone together to hear their perspective, it devolves into a complaint session." This brings us back to the Golden Rule of Organizational Change:


If you're not getting the response you need, 
change the stimulus. (YOU)


...this means "ask better questions" and/or structure your meetings to move beyond the complaints to a constructive place.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/07/kotter-change-commuication-gap.html?utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=twitterfeed#sthash.HP9c7pKP.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Participative processes throughout a project make a huge difference here.  See the next  post for an example of the new and changing management structures for how and why.  


(Originally posted on the Science of Motivation curation stream.) 


~  D


PS:  If you are in an organization that uses yearly performance appraisals, that may be a big indicator of the problem.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 30, 2013 7:06 AM

If the meetings are structured by those without participative change expertise, the results may be what is described on Ron's change website.


Involvement and engagement is not for the inexperienced with process tools and results.  

Those who ARE deeply experienced with vision, strategy, project development and execution may NOT have the expertise for engaging in a to z two-way communication
 through all stages, to overcome the low success rate with change inititatives.


 ~  Deb

Harry Cannon's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:04 AM

Managers need facilitation skills, a clear purpose and an honest ear.

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3 Key Partners in Change Management Execution

3 Key  Partners in Change Management Execution | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

There are three basic key players in strategy execution: the leader, the program manager and the change management lead.

What if we partnered?

It all starts at the beginning.


....It might open productive conversations and whole new working relationships with them. They may want to negotiate a few parameters in the beginning to get comfortable with this dynamic, but that should be quite achievable.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Great stuff from Gail on execution success focused on roles & relationships => partnering to deliver & sustain.  ~  Deb

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 21, 2013 1:29 PM

Collaboration in programme change. Why is this not the norm yet?

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Tools Review ~ And Change: Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools)

Tools Review ~ And Change:  Beyond Performance Management (40 Tools) | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Just 30 percent of these tools deliver as intended. Why?  ...They’re misused by most organizations."


As Jeremy Hope and Steve Player reveal in Beyond Performance Management, while many tools are sound in theory, they’re misused by most organizations. 

For example, executives buy and implement a tool without first asking,

  • "What problem are we trying to solve?” 

And they use tools to command and control frontline teams, not empower them—a serious and costly mistake.
 

Issue No. 251 of Your Weekly Staff Meeting highlights a new book from Harvard Business Review Press on how to select the right management tool—at the right time. The authors describe 40 tools in detail.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As this book fits measurement and planning, it should also be a great resource for anyone working through change.  Not doing may be smarter than doing when it comes to using certain approaches and tools.  ~  D

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Harry Cannon's curator insight, July 2, 2013 5:07 AM

Sounds like one to read. Certainly seen tools misunderstood and mis-used.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 2, 2013 1:45 PM
I'm 1/3rd into this book and it is REALLY on target. Great resource. Thanks for the comments from Suchitra and Harry. I so agree with the "not doing may be smarter" based on a solid review of what the needs and problems are.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 29, 2013 12:47 PM
Ok, I've about finished the book. It does contribute in many helpful ways to breaking out of industrial mindsets that hamper creativity, innovation and collaboration sorely needed in organizational thinking today. It is a helpful checklist for assessing blind spots and "keeping up with the joneses" when such "best practices" in corporate measurement and reporting are not necessary and, even worse, a drain on productivity. Highly recommended!
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Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation

Crossing Over the Change Readiness Bridge with Resistance, to Implementation | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

How about a step beyond the change agents and focusing on the people who matter most, frontline employees and managers, in working through change transition?


Read about the study that provides a conceptual bridge from change readiness (pre-change) to change implementation (post-change).


Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


       

     


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More helpful scholarly work from Ron Koller on making it through the change process, from readiness to and THROUGH implementation. - Deb

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More Commitment isn't Always Better : Change Management Success

More Commitment isn't Always Better : Change Management Success | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Researchers found that more affective  commitment is NOT better.  They found that affective commitment (i.e. desire for a change) has a ceiling. "


Researcher Ron Koller finds that "human behavior is not linear.  While you may think that is an obvious assumption, it is this linear mindset that drives change management failure."



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm quite intrigued by this concept of overcommitment "burnout."  Are you?  There is a parallel in performance management and performance development that I'll blog about soon. ~  Deb

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Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes

Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Embracing change requires you yourself to experience the changes you’re asking your organization to undergo."


Our client is now desperately hoping his division’s leaders will embrace change, maybe even a Blue Ocean Strategy. They’ve reached a dangerous tipping point that could risk the future of their business.


____________________

To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first.
____________________ 


...if you truly want to see, feel and think in new ways, you have to fight your brain’s desire to stay put.


To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first. You need to recognize that new ideas come from trying new solutions in your own head and changing your brain’s focus. Then you can rollout the rest of the plan to your company.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Any Blue Ocean change practitioners out there who wish to comment on their client experience of "do it yourself first?"  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, April 10, 2013 5:04 AM

In 2009, Steve McKee published “When Growth Stalls” in which he notes that 41.2% of nearly 5,700 companies he studied stalled in the previous decade. The number of reasons why are staggering, namely: a failure to focus, no competitive point of difference, and weak brand images and identities, to name just a few.

Given this reality, we can turn to science to explain why businesses stagnate. Growing research from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences reveal that change really is difficult for humans. Resistance comes from three forces:

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Rutgers, Universities, Bias: 3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns and How Timing Counts

Rutgers, Universities, Bias: 3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns and How Timing Counts | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Tensions among senior staff in universities seem to be making the news on a regular basis. Examples include leader strife at Rutgers (blame), Penn State (cascade failure to deal with a crime) and University of Virginia (abrupt leadership goings and comings.)"

At the time of this post, we have the breaking story of not only the firing of a Rutgers basketball coach because of abusive behavior  of his players, as shared widely on video, but also high level conflict of senior university administrators over who is responsible.


The interviews and documents reveal a culture in which the university was far more concerned with protecting itself from legal action than with protecting its students from an abusive coach.


Source:  The New York Times



_____________________________________



…we are biased in every single situation. There’s no such thing as objectivity. ~ Erin White 



_____________________________________

Leaders are the ones who set the tone.  They can also easily miss things in the complexity of the organizational system.  Enron, Johnson and Johnson, and the classroom cheating examples (listed in the post) are three of the sample stories that provide a good range of how challenging it is to consistently walk to talk of ethics in leadership.


Get the full story here:  



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is one of my own posts, a 2013 updated mash-up from a popular post from 2011 on ethics, trust and consistency, now including references on adaptive systems views of leadership. ~  Deb

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Forget About Influence And Change Management, It's Time To Lead A Revolution!

Forget About Influence And Change Management, It's Time To Lead A Revolution! | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"There’s a reason why revolutionary movements so often originate in closed systems like college campuses."


You don’t need to convince everybody, just a local majority.  Once you’ve attained that, the idea can spread to other clusters through the strength of weak ties and before you know it, the movement is gathering steam.

Majorities don’t just rule, they influence, to a much greater extent than most people would think.

...Also, the strength of your community isn’t a function of the number of your followers, but in their relationship to each other.  Once again, it’s not the nodes, but the network that’s really important.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is thoughtful, systemic approach that challenges change myths.  ~  Deb

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:57 PM

Aim for revolution rather than for change management ? Better suited for politics and social life than for private companies and management, I think. But who knows?

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What is change management? (Mount Rushmore version) : Change Management Success

What is change management? (Mount Rushmore version) : Change Management Success | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
The Mount Rushmore of Change Management
- the big four:  John Kotter, Daryl Conner, Linda Ackerman Anderson & Jeff Hiatt

From Daryl Conner, a two-part definition including:

  • Its focus in not on "what" is driving change (technology, reorganization plans, mergers/acquisitions, globalization, etc.),
  •  but on "how" to orchestrate the human infrastructure that surrounds key projects to that people are better prepared to absorb the implications affecting them. 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a clever way to make a point about the origins of Change Management, definitions and to set the context for where it has ended up today.  ~  Deb

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Culture’s Critical Role in Change Management

Culture’s Critical Role in Change Management | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
A new survey shows that when executives fail to focus on culture, their change initiatives founder.

________________________________


    

...it is easier to act your way into a new way of thinking than it is to think your way into a new way of acting.


  
________________________________


Excerpted:  ....those who work with and within their existing culture to change critical behaviors have more success than those who try to change their culture.

     

Said another way, it is easier to act your way into a new way of thinking than it is to think your way into a new way of acting.


....Overall, change initiatives are only adopted and sustained about half the time, our survey shows. But when companies tap into the energy and emotional commitment that are bound up in their cultures, change initiatives are far more sustainable.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More about Booz Allen's approach to change management within culture is in their report:    2013 Culture and Change:  Why Culture Matters and How it Makes Change Stick.  ~  D


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Dr Pam Hill's curator insight, December 20, 2013 7:15 AM

Culture is also important in school districts and school buildings.  It's essential that leaders understand how to bring about long lasting change through the development of a culture that supports the evolution of learning practices!

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Changing Structures and Behaviors at Walgreens

Changing Structures and Behaviors at Walgreens | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
When your strategy shifts, you may need to redesign your organization as well.


…We recognized that [our] command-and-control approach [was] outdated. ...We were missing the richness of empowering [our people] to come up with solutions on their own.



In the past, we had really strong policies and procedures, but our model didn’t allow for innovation or empowered customer service.


...Now, the way we do things is different. At the store level, we don’t want employees to simply complete tasks. We want them to come up with new ideas, and new ways of helping the customers.


This requires a big shift in leadership. Our model of the ideal executive has gone from an authoritative leader who could get new stores up and running fast, to an engaged leader who can hold people accountable, develop them, and manage them.


….A big part of the redesign was to help employees understand how this was different from what they did before.


…Under the new system, leaders are evaluated and bonuses are set according to three key critical areas: financial results, team member engagement, and customer service. There’s also a percentage that accounts for community engagement and events…and another component to accountability: managing under-performers.


There’s a huge change-management effort to make sure the initiatives are sustainable, and we’ve spent about US$30 million on training alone, with more to come. However, a year into the implementation phase, the results are promising. In our pilot program, we went from the bottom 25 percent to the 95th percentile in our engagement survey results.


The Gallup Organization, which measured the results for us, actually thought the numbers were wrong because they’d never seen such a big improvement in one year. We’ll have the next results after the full rollout in 2013.


Source:  http://www.strategy-business.com/article-full-preview/00195

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The performance system cited here is individually based, still a bit traditional, yet Walgreens has made a huge leap from their by-the-numbers original growth only strategy.  It's a good case study of how a 240K member organization decided to implement enterprise and corporate strategy through tactical changes.  ~  Deb

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Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change

Change Thought Leaders ~ Webinar Archive | NEXUS 4 change | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

This is a useful collection of webinars, handouts and materials from thought leaders via Nexus 4 Change.  Examples:

  • Whole System Transformation, A Fireside Chat with Harrison Owen (Open Space Technology), 
  • Future Search 
  • and more.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I attended the insightful and affirming webinar with Harrison Owen.   There is much to mine here.  Great resource!  ~  Deb

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Abolishing Myths: 7 Levers to Achieve High-Performance Culture

Abolishing Myths:  7 Levers to Achieve High-Performance Culture | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Culture is hot. ...we have observed a markedly increasing emphasis on culture.   Case studies are how to achieve sustaining transformational change via  Boston Consulting Group


______________________

Leaders ...want to know how to spark the behaviors that will deliver results during the transformation—and sustain them well beyond. 

______________________


Leaders trying to reshape their organization’s culture are asking: How can we break down silos and become more collaborative or innovative? Others, struggling to execute strategy, are wondering: How do we reconnect with our customers or adapt more proactively to the new regulatory environment?


Leaders overseeing a major transformation want to know how to spark the behaviors that will deliver results during the transformation—and sustain them well beyond.


Those involved with a postmerger integration grapple with how to align the two cultures with the new operating model—and reap the sought-after synergies.


And those simply seeking operating improvements often ask: How can we become more agile? Accelerate decision making? Embed an obsession for continuous improvement throughout the organization?


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Boston Group full article highlights a path through complexity, featuring, Corference Board style, a list of levers:  1) Leadership, 2) People and Development, 3) Performance Management, 4) Informal Interactions, 5) Organization Design, 6) Resources and Tools, 7) Values (beliefs, ideas, norms.)  


It reminds be very much of the venerable 7S McKinsey model that I've referenced for years that stands the test of time.  ~  D

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Keith Meyer's curator insight, June 12, 2013 3:23 PM

Transformational and Culture change in business have become the focus on how to keep an Organisation on top of it's game.

John Wade: Coach; consultant; mentor's curator insight, September 29, 2013 2:23 PM

Some great insights into why some organisations are better able to implement and leverage change better than others.

Harish Maru's curator insight, March 6, 5:17 PM

Culture in an organisation reflects the values of the society. For example in India society is paternalistic. In business context it will result in limiting some person or group's liberty or autonomy for their own good.

 

How an Indian business organisation leverage this value to achieve high performance? It will be futile to go against this social norm.

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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.
________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  

I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I found Ron's chart very direct, humorous and a bit sobering.  How does it match your change project stories?  ~  Deb

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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 12:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 7:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 8:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb

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Good Resistance, Bad Resistance: How can you tell?

Good Resistance, Bad Resistance:  How can you tell? | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

When you think of an employee who is resistant to change, what comes to mind?  ....research on constructive resistance is on the rise.


Positive deviance is the scholarly term for constructive resistance.  The technical term is "constructive deviance," however deviance is so associated to criminal activity, I wish they had picked a different term (Warren, 2004).  They mean deviation from the norm, but the way.

Conflict is probably the easiest type of constructive resistance to tackle in this post.  Groupthink theory (Janis, 1972) posits that a LACK of conflict is bad for a project's performance.


See more at:   http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/06/good-resistance-bad-resistance.html#sthash.MsRgKept.dpuf

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One of Ron's recent post on understanding the true nature of resistance.  ~  Deb

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Beyond Resilience, Building Anti-Fragile Organizations, REVELN

It is about resilience? Or is it about learning how to be Anti-Fragile, a term coined by Nassim Taleb to describe natural or organic systems, things that need some dose of disorder in order to develop.


For example, deprive your bones of stress and they become brittle. Are our HR and organizational system destined to decline, are exist in a mediocre state due to their structure? 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is my own slide share for a recent presentation on change, adapting using both Nassim N. Taleb's "Anti-Fragile" concepts and Adam Grant's work on Givers, Matchers and Takers.   The full blog post here here:


Thanks for visiting.  I'm curious on what you think of these combinations of concepts.  Comments welcome!  ~  Deb

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Yahoo to Buy Tumblr for $1.1 Billion

Yahoo to Buy Tumblr for $1.1 Billion | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Yahoo’s move aims to make up for years of missing out on the growth of social networks and mobile devices.


Excerpts:


The deal would be the largest acquisition of a social networking company in years, surpassing Facebook’s $1 billion purchase of Instagram last year.


Tumblr has over 108 million blogs, with many highly active users.

For Yahoo and its chief executive, Marissa Mayer, buying Tumblr would be a bold move as she tries to breathe new life into the company. The deal, the seventh since Ms. Mayer defected from Google last summer to take over the company, would be her biggest yet.


It is meant to give her company more appeal to young people, and to make up for years of missing out on the revolutions in social networking and mobile devices.


News from Deb:


   
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 20, 2013 8:05 AM

The 7th and biggest deal - Yahoo acquisitions.  The stock market is not liking it --today that is. 


Now the biggest challenge yet, for Marissa Mayer,culture change at Yahoo AND smart connection with the hip, youthful Tumblr and their 108 million blogs, with many highly active users.  Wordpress watching at the gate.

I do like my venerable, old fashioned Flickr.com photo account. Yet if well handled, the coolness of Tumblr could make a good things happen at Flickr.  Challenge:  the account owners are quite a bit different.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:08 PM

More change bound to show soon if this biggest, hip buy of Tumblr has any effect on the venerable Yahoo. ~ Deb

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Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes

Nassim Taleb's 'Antifragile' Celebrates Randomness In People, Markets - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

'Antifragile' is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility.

Many readers misunderstand Taleb’s core message.  They assume that because Taleb writes about unseen and improperly calculated risks, his objective must be to reduce or eliminate risk.  Nothing could be further from the truth. 


Antifragile is a celebration of risk and randomness and a call to arms to recognize and embrace antifragility. 


Rather than reduce risk, organize your life, your business or your society in such a way that it benefits from randomness and the occasional Black Swan event.


Taleb’s own life is a case in point.  He had the free time to write Fooled, The Black Swan and Antifragile because—in his own words—he made “F___ you money” during the greatest Black Swan event of our lifetimes, the 1987 stock market crash.  


...Taleb’s trading style is antifragile, had the 1987 crash never happened, Taleb would not have been materially hurt.  His trading style puts little at risk but allows for outsized returns.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Taleb's coinage of "Antifragile" is compelling.  Change practitioners might find this a useful concept to understanding how to survive and thrive in a VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous) world.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 17, 2013 11:57 AM
Anne, your layering encourages critical nuanced views beyond the book's "shiny new term" idea. Sometimes the first thing to do is "not do," as in, don't just do something, stand there. Doe we need an "intervention?" What are the other perspectives available, thinking systemically? Re: Iatrogenics: From the "Black Swan Report: "...the argument of Chapters 21 and 22 on the convexity of iatrogenics (only treat the VERY ill): Mortality is convex to blood pressure."
Anne Caspari's comment, April 22, 2013 6:42 AM
Hi Deb, thanks :-). I also reckon there are MANY fresh perspectives on how to handle different systems (or leave them alone), may they be health, financial, socio-political, ecological.... I love it and keep smiling to myself when I see the aha - moments on applied convexity/anti/fragility pop up in daily life, business and otherwise... compliments also on your scoops...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 22, 2013 7:16 PM
Thanks Anne. Systems and org. groupies a bit, maybe. ;-)
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Systems in Action: Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco

Systems in Action:  Collaboration and the Internet of Everything ~ Cisco | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Change is constant. And technology has always been about change and convergence. "This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit."


Massive, global-scale change occurring now is happening at rates faster than anyone ever predicted.

How Big is “Everything”?

The Internet of Everything will create $14.4 trillion in value at stake through the combination of increased revenues and lower costs in just the next ten years – creating an opportunity to increase global corporate profits by an estimated 21% over the next decade.


The five main factors fueling this value are:


  • Asset utilization: $2.5 trillion in reduced costs
  • Employee productivity: $2.5 trillion in greater labor efficiencies
  • Supply chain and logistics: $2.7 trillion through eliminating waste
  • Customer intimacy: $3.7 trillion through addition of more customers
  • Innovation: $3.0 trillion through reducing time to market
    

Collaboration ties in throughout these factors. This is a wide ecosystem where everyone can participate and benefit: Small businesses, enterprises, service providers, system integrators, device makers are all critical to building out the connections and scaling experiences across every industry.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is the promising side of big data and collaboration.  What do you see in your categories of cost & benefit and abundance in this thinking?  ~  Deb

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Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.


Focusing on Black Swans


Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by RandomnessThe Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


...The quest for antifragility

The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   


He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


Related posts by Deb:


   

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 8, 2013 11:28 AM

Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

Harry Cannon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:25 AM

Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.

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Six (6) Steps for Implementing Agile Across the Organization from Lessons Learned

Six (6) Steps for Implementing Agile Across the Organization from Lessons Learned | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"After facing difficulties attempting to transform a group of twelve skilled people into a self-organized agile team, Ove Holmberg learned some valuable lessons on what it takes to implement agile within an organization."


Excerpts:

1. Decide if Agile Is Right for Your Organization
The agile mentor is one tool for building up this knowledge if you are not sure or need facts or success stories to support your approach.


The agile mentor...builds up your confidence as an agile manager and helps you take small agile steps toward your self-organized team and your new role as an agile manager.  ...(Get) an agile mentor early on in the project. 

2. Get Managers’ Buy-in with Data
The State of Agile Development Survey 2010 (Version One) states that the top two reasons for companies not fully adopting agile methods are: “management opposed to change” and “loss of management control.”  

3. Get an Excited Team; Get Rid of the Slackers
...I should have formed my new team. ...I discovered the biggest defect in agile: It is assumed that people, by default, are skilled, disciplined, and willing to self-organize. The real world isn’t so.  

    

Related posts by Deb:

     
      
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Hindsight in Agile implementation tends to be a valuable change management resource or any similar change. ~ D

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