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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Revealed – the 147 Companies That Run the World | Forbes & New Scientist

Revealed – the 147 Companies That Run the World  |  Forbes & New Scientist | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.


The study's assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable.
 

The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York's Occupy Wall Street movement, ...but the study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power. It combines the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world's transnational corporations (TNCs).

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"If connectedness clusters, so does wealth, ...
money flows towards the most highly connected members." ~ Dan Braha of NECSI

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"Reality is so complex, we must move away from dogma, whether it's conspiracy theories or free-market," says James Glattfelder. "Our analysis is reality-based."

From the Forbes summary version of this post:


... the data set...excludes GSEs and privately-held companies and is dominated by banks, institutional investors and mutual funds that don’t always have much in the way of control over assets.


Forbes reader danogden ...commented: “…pension plans, corporate 401(k) plans and individual funds..manage trillions in assets ultimately belonging to individuals who are predominantly not in the “1%”. …


...“custodian banks” in the list — companies who hold the assets of asset managers to ensure timely processing of things ...do not own the assets, or even really control [them.] A better list would be the actual asset OWNERS, rather than the vendors who manage, house and clear said assets.”


 If connectedness clusters, so does wealth, says Dan Braha of NECSI: in similar models, money flows towards the most highly connected members. 


...The real question, says the Zurich team, is whether it can exert concerted political power. Driffill feels 147 is too many to sustain collusion. Braha suspects they will compete in the market but act together on common interests. Resisting changes to the network structure may be one such common interest.


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Complexity science is a window to understanding nature as well as ourselves in a global system.  This article is blend of two, from the original New Scientist post from 2011, and from a Forbes summary that was listed on LinkedIn today, September 2013.  ~  Deb

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Jim Allen, III's curator insight, September 13, 2013 10:26 AM

They didn't dig deep enough into who heads, runs, and holds most interest in these companies and the number will be closer to 12 families.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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The Balance of Fearlessness, Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, Businesses Aiding the World’s Poor

The Balance of Fearlessness, Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, Businesses Aiding the World’s Poor | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Jacqueline Novogratz of the Acumen Fund, which invests in businesses aiding the world’s poor, says, '...it’s holding that balance of not being reckless, but also having a huge element of fearlessness.'"

  

Insights into those working with the world's poor, including this leader, sheds light on moldering, out-of-date leadership practices and new ways of leading that have yet to take hold.

  

Jacqueline Novogratz is the chief executive of the Acumen Fund which invests in businesses aiding the world’s poor. This interview was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.


This also goes with this quote by Arianna Huffington:  


"Fearlessness is like a muscle. I know from my own life that the more I exercise it the more natural it becomes to not let my fears run me."

  

Excerpts:

  

Jacqueline Novogratz's approach to leadership:

  

Leaders can get stuck in groupthink because they’re really not listening, or they’re listening only to what they want to listen to, or they actually think they’re so right there's no listening. 

  

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Ask questions in a way that will elicit more nuanced answers...

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The kind of leaders we need....are really open to listening to solutions from people who are most impacted by the problems.

  

I’ll often say at Acumen that you’ve got to learn to listen with your whole body.

  

Lean in and pay attention to their body language and their level of comfort or discomfort. Ask questions in a way that will elicit more nuanced answers, rather than the answers you would like to get.


Q. What kind of culture are you trying to foster at Acumen?

  

We are building companies, and so we have to be really accountable. We’ve got to be tough, and yet we have to be very generous, since we’re working in communities where people make a dollar or two dollars a day.

  

We talk about the power of listening and we juxtapose it with leadership, because sometimes you’ve listened enough, and now it’s time to make a decision.

   

We think about our values [as] a tension or a balance. We talk about listening and leadership; accountability and generosity; humility and audacity.

  

You’ve got to have the humility to see the world as it is …working with poor communities, that’s not easy to do — have the audacity to know why you are trying to make it be different, to imagine the way it could be. And then the immutable values are respect and integrity.


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We’re building something no one has ever really built before, and so don’t be afraid of making mistakes. Let’s just make the decision to do something.

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Q. What are some other lessons you’ve learned about how to lead?

  

A. ...I have this mantra: Just start and let the work teach you. We’re building something no one has ever really built before, and so don’t be afraid of making mistakes. Let’s just make the decision to do something.

  

This goes back to audacity and humility. …If you start off talking about all the reasons that you’re not going to get there, you’re not going to get there. …It’s holding that balance of not being reckless, [and] having a huge element of fearlessness.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, October 20, 2012 12:45 AM
I am so happy there are still people like you who are making the lives of the poor easier. Today, as we wake up each morning, we think about what the future brings to us. We complain about bills, how tired are we i solving problems,Yet, all around the world, we did not realize that there are more pitiful and lost souls. We have to accept that we are still more lucky than those people who do not have homes, and are living in war zones.