Change Leadership Watch
15.2K views | +3 today
Follow
Change Leadership Watch
How change happens and who is leading it.  For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

It’s a beautiful time to be alive, educated and entrepreneurial

It’s a beautiful time to be alive, educated and entrepreneurial | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

I grew up watching Star Trek, ...believing t...we would all be using communicators, replicators, tricorders, and transporters. I was optimistic...

    

...I was disappointed. I grew up into a world filled with hunger, poverty, and disease—....a world .... in which people obsess over maximizing their share of the pie. There is a greater focus on building wealth than on bettering the world.

      

_____________________
   
...
This period in human history is unique, because now entrepreneurs can do what only governments and big corporations could do before. 

   

_____________________
    

No wonder so many MBA students want to join investment banks: it is the best way to reap big financial rewards and to get ahead.   ...I’m an MBA myself, so I can be critical about MBAs. I too worked at an investment bank, ...I too used to obsess over building wealth, and didn’t believe I could really make a difference in the world. 

         

...I am here to tell you that you have opportunities that I could not even have imagined when I was young. You can build the Star Trek future that we have dreamed about. 

      

...This period in human history is unique, because now entrepreneurs can do what only governments and big corporations could do before. You are the space cadets with the opportunities to make amazing things happen.



_____________________

    
We need people who care about enriching humanity rather than just themselves. 

_____________________

    


....Whatever you do, don’t take a mindless, meaningless job with a big company just because they offer you a big salary. Try to be somewhere where you can constantly redefine yourself and keep learning. That is what it is going to be about: constant learning and reinvention.

      

The future is going to be what we make it. It can be the Star Trek utopia or a Mad Max wreck, a creative playground or an Orwellian nightmare. That is why we need people with good values and ethics leading the way.  We need people who care about enriching humanity rather than just themselves. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This gem of a commencement address is well worth a slow, careful reading.  Vivek Wadhwa delivered this address this year at Hult International Business School. It is informative to us all, not just his audience this past summer at the school formerly known as  the Arthur D. Little School of Management.  Click on the photo or title to review the well-researched, technology savvy, compassionate and practical view of what's coming, affecting our families, including changes in livelihood.   I like how the author encourages us to choose other options than just corporate jobs for the big bucks. 


Who is he?

 His bio, from his website is as follows:

Vivek Wadhwa is a Fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; Director of Research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at the Pratt School of Engineering,  Duke University; and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University. He is author of  “The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent”—which was named by The Economist as a Book of the Year of 2012, and ” Innovating Women: The Changing Face of Technology”—which documents the struggles and triumphs of women.  He was named by Foreign Policy Magazine as Top 100 Global Thinker in 2012. In 2013, TIME Magazine listed him as one of The 40 Most Influential Minds in Tech.  

    

 ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 17, 2014 9:46 PM

I've shared this gem of a commencement address by Vivek Wadhwa on Change Leadership Watch as well as here.  He delivered this address at Hult International Business School. It is informative to us all, not just his audience this past summer at the school formerly known as  the Arthur D. Little School of Management.  Click on the photo or title to review the well-researched, technology savvy, compassionate and practical view of what's coming, affecting our families, including changes in livelihood.   I like how the author encourages us to choose other options than just corporate jobs for the big bucks. 

    

Who is he?    His bio, from his website is as follows:
    
Vivek Wadhwa is a Fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; Director of Research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at the Pratt School of Engineering,  Duke University; and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University. He is author of  “The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent”—which was named by The Economist as a Book of the Year of 2012, and ” Innovating Women: The Changing Face of Technology”—which documents the struggles and triumphs of women.  He was named by Foreign Policy Magazine as Top 100 Global Thinker in 2012. In 2013, TIME Magazine listed him as one of The 40 Most Influential Minds in Tech. 

     

 ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op

Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Zingerman's Community of Businesses is a staple of Ann Arbor, and it's achieved great success through highly unorthodox practices.


The flagship deli, founded in 1982, is now just one of nine businesses in the Zingerman's Community of Businesses, which also includes a bakery, creamery, candy company, and restaurant.


These businesses are founded on a unique philosophy without traditional business hierarchy.  Zingerman's emphasize collective decision-making.  [Now] ...the company is on track to make $50 million this fiscal year.


A worker co-op is an old business model that has seen renewed interest post-recession due to a lack of investors creating jobs in communities.


Zingerman's has been focused on getting its employees to think like owners long before hard economic times.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer as competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 20, 2014 7:33 PM

As I commented originally on Change Leadership Watch:  Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What Makes Costco One of America’s Best Companies

What Makes Costco One of America’s Best Companies | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
The Motley Fool - Costco is one of the 25 Best Companies in America.


The case for Costco
Costco has been lionized as "the Anti-Walmart" for its long policy of paying all employees a living wage and good benefits, including health coverage. In 2005, The New York Times claimed the average pay for Costco employees was 42% higher than Wal-mart's Sam's Club warehouse.


In 2008, Slate reported that after five years, a cashier makes about $40,000, and that workers pay only about 12% of health care costs out of pocket.


Any kind of job at Costco can also turn into a career thanks to the company's policy of hiring from within.


Wall Street, predictably, hates this. According to them, employees should be paid the least possible so that returns can accrue to shareholders.


In 2004, Deustche Bank analyst Bill Dreher famously complained that at Costco, it's better to be an employee than a shareholder.


Well, if Bill Dreher was a shareholder in 2004, I hope he didn't sell. Between January of 2004 and 2013, Costco shares more than quadrupled market returns, returning 180% to the S&P 500's 40%.


...The Foolish bottom line
Over 30 years, ...Costco has defied Wall Street "wisdom" through generosity to employees and devotion to customers, making investors rich along the way.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Visit Sam's Club & visit Costco. Notice the difference in the vibe from the staff. ~ Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

3 Long-Lasting Sustainable Companies Teach How To Both Thrive And Give Back

3 Long-Lasting Sustainable Companies Teach How To Both Thrive And Give Back | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Inspiring Rockstars of the new economy ~ companies which inspire us with their ability to make money while making a difference, as well as their high growth and high impact."


Operating from 25 to nearly 225 years, these companies have maintained their commitment to mission through up and down business cycles, continued to create high-quality jobs and to improve the quality of life in our communities, and paved the way for today’s growing group of green, responsible, and sustainable businesses.


1) Sun Light and Power, founded in 1976,  has been providing renewable energy and energy efficiency technology to California homeowners and businesses throughout on-again, off-again government support for solar.

  • SLP has also remained devoted to its employees and the community and became a B Corp in 2009. 
  • Rather than subcontracting installations (a common industry practice), the company hires full-time employees and provides a living wage, health benefits, a retirement plan, and paid time off.


2) Seventh Generation founded in 1988,  is one of the nation’s most recognized brands of natural household and personal care products.  

  • The company has also grown its high-quality job base, doubling the size of its team to 113 in 2011.
  • All of Seventh Generation’s products, raw materials, byproducts, and processes are sustainable.

3)  King Arthur Flour, after nearly 225 years in business, their secret is: focusing on employees.
  • They began as a family-owned business before transitioning towards an employee-ownership model in 1996 and finally becoming 100% employee owned and thriving.
  • Aan employee-owned B Corp, KAF has the freedom to emphasize values beyond profit, like environmental responsibility, community engagement, and the wellness and satisfaction of employees. 
  • More than 80% of health care premiums are paid for families and both full- and part-time employees receive a living wage.

What are the priorities of your company?  One of Deb's recent posts:
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sustainable businesses that are thriving are great role models for us all.  Sharing the examples thanks to B Lab and Fast Company's co-create listings.  ~  Deb

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, January 7, 2015 4:43 PM

"The ability to live their values at work is the secret to King Arthur Flour’s longevity and success." Key to a company thats been successful for 225 years. Should be a sign for us all!

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Dare Care Share
Scoop.it!

Purpose Driven Profits: Are You a Conscious Capitalist?

Purpose Driven Profits:  Are You a Conscious Capitalist? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It’s time for capitalism to find a higher purpose.


Conscious capitalists focus on a higher purpose—to have a positive impact on the world, through the products and services they deliver and the value they create for their stakeholders. The four principles of conscious capitalism—purpose, stakeholder orientation, conscious leaders, and conscious cultures—are practiced in well-known and revered companies such as Whole Foods Markets, Patagonia, Tata Group, Toms Shoes, Medtronics, and TDIndustries. These companies have figured out how to be fierce competitors and generate superior financial performance while treasuring their employees and delighting their customers without destroying the planet.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Kenneth Mikkelsen  has aided the perspective in this article by defining Higher Purpose as more than, making money, Stakeholder Orientation from a ecosystem perspective, as "healthy stakeholders lead to a healthy business system."  He's added 2 more:  Conscious Leadership who recognize the integral role of culture and purposefully cultivate Conscious Culture, the "values, principles, practices [that] connects the stakeholders to each other and to the purpose [of] the company." ~  D

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, October 2, 2014 8:22 AM

Higher Purpose: Recognizing that every business has a purpose that includes, but is more than, making money. By focusing on its Higher Purpose, a business inspires, engages and energizes its stakeholders.


Stakeholder Orientation: Recognizing interdependent nature of life and the human foundations and business, a business needs to create value with and for its various stakeholders (customers, employees, vendors, investors, communities, etc.). Like the life forms in an ecosystem, healthy stakeholders lead to a healthy business system.


Conscious Leadership: Human social organizations are created and guided by leaders – people who see a path and inspire others to travel along the path. Conscious Leaders understand and embrace the Higher Purpose of business and focus on creating value for and harmonizing the interests of the business stakeholders. They recognize the integral role of culture and purposefully cultivate Conscious Culture.


Conscious Culture: This is the ethos – the values, principles, practices – underlying the social fabric of a business, which permeates the atmosphere of a business and connects the stakeholders to each other and to the purpose, people and processes that comprise
the company. 

Ian Berry's curator insight, December 22, 2014 9:39 PM

I embrace the concept of conscious capitalism. The beginning for me is increased self-awareness amongst leaders and therefore the capacity to see other people and our planet in better ways than the majority do now

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Smart profits, smart values and sustainability from a bank boss who dares to be different

Smart profits, smart values and sustainability from a bank boss who dares to be different | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Anders Bouvin is the boss of the most successful bank you've probably never heard of. And he, like the bank he runs, will challenge your preconceptions.   

    

For starters, this African-born, Swedish chief executive of Handelsbanken's growing UK operation doesn't receive an annual bonus, ...[and] has been with the Swedish bank for 28 years.

    

Most surprisingly, the 55-year-old supports west London's Queens Park Rangers Football Club with a passion intriguing for a Swede who spent the first 10 years of his life growing up in Zimbabwe.

   

….Anders Bouvin…was thrilled to be offered a job…in a company "whose values coincided completely with my own".

    

Those values - long-term-ism, and a philosophy of de-centralization encapsulated in the slogan "the branch is the bank" - seem almost too good to be true in a current banking era of fines, debt crises and outsourced customer service.

  

Big banks, according to the popular narrative, were the primary causers of the global debt crisis thanks to their reckless investment in high-risk mortgage-backed bonds.

    

Handelsbanken says its branches, such as this one in Aberdeen, come first


But Handelsbanken remained above the fray, emerging with a balance sheet strong enough to make European banking regulators purr with delight.


…next to no marketing keeps overheads down and return on equity up.

     

At Handelsbanken returning a share of the profits to long-term staff is also key. If the bank exceeds the average profitability rate of its peers, then surplus profits are put into a fund and distributed to all the staff.

    

Handelsbanken
*  Founded in 1871
*  Has no sales or market-share targets
*  Staff get flat salaries without bonuses
*  Claims to have achieved higher profitability than the average of its rivals for 41 years in a row


...Handelsbanken, headquarter[ed] in London, is expanding to meet increased demand while some of its larger rivals get smaller.


"Many banks are having to absorb huge losses and have had to shrink to repair their balance sheets... and there are clear indications that SMEs [small and medium-sized businesses] are bearing the brunt of this. It's very sad."


All in all, Anders Bouvin appears the least likely candidate for executive burnout you'll ever meet.

Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

    

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is yet another positive example of how smart, people-centered values, with decision-making driven down the chain and low hierarchy, can drive profitability and sustainability, even in one of the most traditional industries. More information on comparisons with other business models to follow. ~ Deb


more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:02 PM

This is yet another positive example of how smart, people-centered values, with decision-making driven down the chain and low hierarchy, can drive profitability and sustainability, even in one of the most traditional industries. ~ Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Solid Systems: A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values

Solid Systems:  A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"A rare CEO personal phone call:  After making a customer complaint, I received a phone call from the CEO of Jiffy mix, the top producer of baking mixes in America."


While Jiffy competes by selling quality products at the lowest price (40 to 60 cents for corn muffins, for example), most American companies now try to sell their products by making people feel inadequate. 


Many of our best and brightest minds shuffle paper and money ...to earn big salaries, while the real creators of wealth — bakers, builders, farmers, inventors, teachers, designers, and doctors are loaded down by debt.

Jiffy mix is a welcome trend-breaker.

According to CEO Holmes, "Our staff puts more emphasis on internal and external relationships than we do on completing tasks. This is very different from most companies ... Our dedication to strong family business values, combined with real world professionalism has us uniquely situated for the 21st Century."


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Michigan based Jiffy Mix will have to fend with GMO issues & carb reduction in the future.  Yet today they know where their core audience is and where they are going.  In the end, business is still all about sustainability, relationships and not just the short term bottom line. ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

How Luther went Viral like Arab Spring: Message, Movement & Social Media

How Luther went Viral like Arab Spring: Message, Movement & Social Media | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Leader lessons from those who were too slow to adapt to new ways of sharing the message."


Higher education and churches are exemplars of slow change.  There are many examples of higher education disruption in this curation stream.  Here's the first church-based example with more to come.  The lessons apply to all change leaders, especially considering the pervasiveness of culture & belief in institutions of all types.



Excerpted:

 

Tom Standage of The Economist magazine wrote an article comparing the Protestant Reformation to the current use of social media in the Arab Spring.

 

Martin Luther, he says, was a relatively unknown cleric who took advantage of the hottest technology of 1517. He wrote short articles and theses, printed short and punchy pamphlets and also developed catchy hymns to pass his message along.

 

Tom points out three major ways that the Reformation-age use of printing parallels our own social media.

 

1) he connected directly with the everyman, writing in German, not Latin. He lead singing that stuck with people. He wrote short, non-theological works to make powerful points.

 

2)  When the church wanted to refute Luther, they wrote in Latin and attacked his theology. ...church leaders understood, but failed to capture the everyman...

 

3)  Finally, ...Martin Luther ultimately could not control his own message.   ...On the negative side, this lead to a bloody peasant's rebellion that Luther had to distance himself from. On the positive side, ...the Reformation was free to spread out of Germany and across the world.

 


Wednesday, 15 February 2012 

more...
No comment yet.