Change Leadership...
Follow
Find tag "teams"
12.4K views | +7 today
Change Leadership Watch
How change happens and who is leading it.  For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Waigaya Is the Way, Beyond the Hierarchy at Honda, On the Shop Floor

Waigaya Is the Way, Beyond the Hierarchy at Honda, On the Shop Floor | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

At the Japanese auto giant, unplanned, agenda-free meetings are ubiquitous and indispensable.


None of the conference rooms were available, so the meeting was held in a maintenance closet...


Shoehorned into the room were factory floor managers, assembly line associates ...and quality control experts at the Anna, Ohio, engine plant, where Honda has been making motors and drivetrain components since 1985. 


...All points of view or suggestions are equal.  A serious crisis on the plant floor spurred [a} spontaneous meeting. 


Such unplanned, shapeless gatherings are the hallmark of the Honda Way. They are called waigaya, ...a name given them by Takeo Fujisawa, the business partner of company founder Soichiro Honda...


On that day…, away from the thrum of the factory, …a Honda manager said to the others, “Look, I’d prefer not to belabor this issue because we’ve got a lot of work to do to get this process moving. And since the fix will be such a time sink, let’s not make it worse by losing more time discussing it.”

    

Although most in the room concurred with the manager, one of the associates noted… “We’re doing something very wrong if a slight problem in the engine isn’t addressed until the end of the vehicle’s assembly line…   We should have discovered this problem before.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Equality of viewpoints, perspective, fixing problems in real time, this is the modern company.    Honda's brand is focused on

their Fundamental Beliefs of:

  • Respect for the Individual
  • The Three Joys:   The Joy of Buying, Selling, and Creating
    

Management Policy includes:

  • Proceed always with ambition and youthfulness.
  • Enjoy your work and encourage open communication.
  • Strive constantly for a harmonious flow of work.


The example of the meeting in a broom closet illustrates a less hierarchical approach. Hierarchy has advantages, but is also not as necessarily in Honda's fluid approach.  What do you find useful in the Honda example?  `  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Your Team Can Smell a Rat

Your Team Can Smell a Rat | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Let’s call him Frank.He seemed so sincere, so talented, so driven. When I met him on a business trip—my former CEO and I—I liked him right away. ...Seemed like a great fit."


The CEO and I didn’t listen to our subject matter experts. We thought we knew better.


Frank was a disaster. He one of the most self-absorbed and devious people I’ve ever worked with. Because of the benevolent nature of our organization I was working for at the time, it took us years to untangle the mess we had gotten into, and by then he’d done serious damage to our team’s reputation—not to mention motivation and productivity.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One of the author's more recent book is, All In: How the Best Managers Create a Culture of Belief and Drive Big Results,  It features solid research and good examples of the impact of culture on success, so he knows from this single example of "the rat" to company wide culture change on what makes a difference.  


From one reviewer:   In a healthy culture....those who share it are nourished by mutual respect and trust. It is no coincidence that most of the companies that are annually ranked [as] most admired and best to work for are also annually ranked among those that are most profitable and have the greatest cap value in their respective industries.    ~  D

more...
John Michel's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:50 PM

A great lesson in hoy leaders would listen to their team before making  key hires.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


It's the how, the what, not so much!


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see buzz about updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


HOW we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from EPIC Infographic
Scoop.it!

Leading the Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion

Leading the Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

How can change leaders support high performance, innovative teams? The infographic below cites 10 innovation strategies.  This is close.  There will be more of these process charts and innovation graphics.  


This one features:


Step 2:  Working at the organization's edges, the fringe & close to customers (I've heard Dr. Jeff DeGraff talk about fringe teams this year.)


Step 3:  Culture that  supports experimentation, failure.  This is ubiquitous in mention, scarce in after-the-fact reporting.  Better known examples, 3M (Post-Its) and Google (Google Lab: Buzz, Wave, etc.)


Step 6: Customer immersion, pain points


Step 10:  Metrics, measures

 

Sources include:  Christensen & Raynor, The Innovator's Solution: Creating & Sustaining Successful Growth, 2003  


Note the continuous improvement language, adjusted slightly, a 'la W. Edwards Deming:  Ready, Aim, Fire, Adjust.  Like Plan, Do, Check, Act.


Via Jonha Revesencio
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

7 Secrets of Union Management Success with Teams, Michigan News

7 Secrets of Union Management Success with Teams, Michigan News | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

What are the 7 secrets to sustainability with teams, management and unions? We presented our lessons learned at the recent Partnerships in Progress Michigan Labor and Management Association (MLMA) Conference in East Lansing, Michigan."


Overview:  Once what I want differs from what you want, we are in conflict. Conflict will naturally increase when shifting from a supervisor-to-employee model to a team model. This presentation describes a whole system, top to bottom and side to side process to implement teams in a union environment.


The “from me to we” shift is continuous process that requires a different type of renewal annually. With commitment to this approach, everyone from top management and union officials down to frontline supervisors and employees can mutually benefit.


The full slideshare and photo set is here or go to:

http://reveln.com/7-secrets-of-union-management-success-with-teams-mlma/



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sustainability means "Never check the box" (the work never finishes) along with elevating the importance of growing relationships within and among union and management leaders and the work community.

This was one of my own recent presentations with Fenwick Koller Associates, who have made great progress in helping teamwork happen and sustain itself within very tradition-bound settings.  Let us know if you agree. 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 25, 10:31 AM
GABY, you are welcome!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 3:57 PM

The full slideshare and photo set is here or go to:

http://reveln.com/7-secrets-of-union-management-success-with-teams-mlma/

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson

How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

There is nothing more important for a business than hiring the right team. If you get the perfect mix of people working for your company, you have a far greater chance of success."


Excerpted:

Personality is the key. It is not something that always comes out in interview – people can be shy.....It is easier with an extrovert, but be wary of people becoming overexcited in the pressure of interviews.


________________________

Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. 

________________________


You can learn most jobs extremely quickly once you are thrown in the deep end. Within three months you can usually know the ins and outs of a role. If you are satisfied with the personality, then look at experience and expertise.


Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. While specialists are sometimes necessary, versatility should not be underestimated.


Related posts by Deb:
     

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

      

Beyond Resilience: Black Swans, Anti-Fragility and Change

       

Using Jung to Clarify the Power of Introversion and Extroversion in Coaching

 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes!  Starting with personality, then transferable skills and fit into culture (read, the BIG team) makes such a difference, yet does not fit our hiring patterns that are often about fitting into a template of past skill categories.   

Sir Richard Branson's piece also highly resonantes with his LinkedIn audience based on the commentary.   He moves credentials MUCH further down on the list.

This is from a successful entrepreneur who knows failure.  He did not succeed in his first two businesses, selling Christmas Trees and parakeets (really.) From there he rose from work at a record shop, to Virgin Records in the 1970s to a large network of businesses including Virgin Galactic in 2012.
 

"A business has to be involving, it has to be fun, and it has to exercise your creative instincts." ~ Richard Branson

~  Deb 


PS:  One of the comments, "Can I work for you?"  :-)

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:03 AM

Originally posted in Change  Leadership Watch, this post gives great pointers on what really matters when YOU decide where you best fit and can contribute.  ~  D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Leadership Teams: Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry

Leadership Teams:  Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Factors that truly differentiate top firms. It's the leader teams!

Recently, the Focus Consulting Group surveyed more than 100 asset management firms around the world, testing both for the strength of their cultures and for the effectiveness of their leadership teams....


Excerpts:


Of the investment professionals we surveyed, fully 94% agree with the statement: "Culture is important to our firm's success." Why do they think so? For them, the key benefit is "effective decision making." Both are interesting findings from an industry often seen as celebrating lone geniuses and superstars.


The same "elite" six firms that demonstrated superior cultures also posted senior leadership teamwork scores that are significantly higher than average. In particular, they distinguished themselves from the rest of the investment industry on five dimensions.


Source:  http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/04/where_teamwork_thrives_in_the.html?awid=9186393578493521766-3271



more...
No comment yet.