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Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That.

Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research show how these top executives have taken charge of their careers.

     

It’s the responsibility of management to tackle gender diversity..[and]… evidence suggests that our leaders aren’t doing a very good job of it, at least not yet.


________________
 

[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program. 

________________

     

Women still represent less than 5% of CEOs around the globe, and they remain seriously underrepresented in other top management positions and on executive boards.

     

[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program.  … Lauren Ready concluded [this] from a study she did here at the International Consortium for Executive Development Research, in which she interviewed 60 top female executives from around the world to learn how they rose to the top.

   

For one, these executives take the time to explore what they want out of work and life [photo, chart.]

One byproduct…they pay special attention to how they might fit within a company’s culture.

    

This finding is consistent with research from Harvard professor Boris Groysberg, who’s found that while the performance of male stars falters when they switch companies, women continue to excel, in part because they’ve done their homework when it comes to fit.

   

The women in Ready’s study also understand the limits of fit. They aren’t “one of the guys” and they don’t try to be.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's still a man's world in the executive ranks, even in the college town where I live, the land of start-ups, women sparsely populate the fast growing, entrepreneurial executive ranks.  


It is also good to reach that the qualities listed in Ready's research among high-achieving women includes the urge to bring other women along with them.   It's a way ambitious women can "lean it" with a little help from her friends in high places, for the savvy reason that the executives "view [it] as a way to raise their companies’ market value, by boosting the presence of women in senior roles and in boardrooms."  


This brings hope that leadership will someday represent the world, rather than tradition and history in the leadership ranks.  ~  D 

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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, April 14, 2014 1:02 AM

There is sexism in the workplace, and I'll do my best to keep it out of my future classroom. I think that feminism has the potential to be taken overboard, by way of radicals, and that a 'humanism' is a better approach. Equality is obviously better than some of the superiority complexes associated with oppression ideologies gone awry; something I hope doesn't happen to feminism in the coming years as we combat this women-don't-riseto-the-top trend.

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Harvard Business School Case Study: Gender Equity, Women in the Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School Case Study: Gender Equity, Women in the Harvard Business School | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

An aggressive Gender Equity program intended to foster female success brought improvements, but also resentment and uncertainty.


___________________
   
Many Wall Street-hardened women confided that Harvard was worse than any trading floor...
   

___________________

      

     

Year after year, women who had arrived with the same test scores and grades as men fell behind at the country’s premier business training ground. Attracting and retaining female professors was a losing battle; from 2006 to 2007, a third of the female junior faculty left


     

Harvard Business School says it wants to improve the gender balance among faculty members, but it is far from that goal without extensive hiring.

    

Many Wall Street-hardened women confided that Harvard was worse than any trading floor, with first-year students divided into sections that took all their classes together and often developed the overheated dynamics of reality shows.


Some male students, many with finance backgrounds, commandeered classroom discussions and hazed female students and younger faculty members, and openly ruminated on whom they would “kill, sleep with or marry” (in cruder terms). Alcohol-soaked social events could be worse.

      

In 2010, Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard’s first female president, appointed a new dean who pledged to do far more than his predecessors to remake gender relations at the business school.

      

Dean Frances Frei, …a popular professor turned administrator who had become a target of student ire, was known for the word “unapologetic,” as in: we are unapologetic about the changes we are making.

       

By graduation, the school had become a markedly better place for female students, according to interviews with more than 70 professors, administrators and students…   Women at the school finally felt like, “ ‘Hey, people like me are an equal part of this institution,’ ” said Rosabeth Moss Kanter, a longtime professor.

    

…yet even the deans pointed out that the experiment had brought unintended consequences and brand new issues. The grade gap had vaporized so fast that no one could quite say how it had happened. The interventions had prompted some students to revolt, wearing “Unapologetic” T-shirts to lacerate Ms. Frei for what they called intrusive social engineering.


UPDATE:  See the 2014 apology by the current Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria here.



 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In the tradition of excellent storytelling, the Times ends this in-depth story with a graduation speech by a Ms. Boyarsky, “the classroom truth-teller” - winner of the a prized Baker Scholarship, usually held by mostly males.  

Her “witty, self-deprecating speech unlike any in the school’s memory” and provides a capstone ending to a remarkable and sobering story about women in business.


Baby, you’ve still got a long way to go.  (Paraphrase of old Virginia Slims cigarette ad.)

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A Change Leader Profile: 3 Ways to Define it

A Change Leader Profile:  3 Ways to Define it | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Look for five key competencies - drawn from..." a change-agent profile [based on]... extensive data on Fortune 1000 executives across a wide spectrum of industries. 


We’ve discovered... in that senior group:

    

  • They’re somewhat rare. Approximately 20 percent of senior executives scored high on five key competencies that correlate with effective change management.
   
  • Executives with those five competencies are more task-oriented than people-oriented.
    
  • They also appear to be motivated most by achievement. Power is a close second.
    

And here’s how we arrived at those high-level findings.


We analyzed competencies  ...we’ve identified the following strengths as key indicators of effective change management:

   

  1. Demonstrates flexibility and resilience. 
  2. Recognizes growth opportunities
  3. Strives for results. Focuses on improving performance.
  4. Leads courageously.  
  5. Gains buy-in.  



    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This post also connects DISC profile behaviors such as driving and impact, along with values such as achievement and power to those who lead the pack in effective change leader success.   ~  D

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    8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes

    8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches:  The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    "To date, there have been 44 United States presidents - on  January 21st Barack Obama delivered the 57th Inaurgural Address."



    Here are excerpts from eight (8) lessons the author, Margaret M. Perlis, learned from the best and worst of the inaugural addresses including:


    Excerpts:


    Keep It Real:  James Buchanan, our 15th president, was one of the worst in American history, when the issues of slavery and secession were reaching a boiling point. While Buchanan rejected slavery...he refused to challenge the constitutional establishment...and states that were threatening secession.


    ...His inauguration speech ...diminish(es) the severity of impending conflicts by peppering it with words like “simple” or “happy.”


    Know Your Audience, Understand Your Outcome:


    Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address was delivered to a war-torn and weary nation.  ...Lincoln’s brief 600-word address, ....one of the most powerful in U.S. history ...spurned triumphalism, instead choosing a tone of magnanimity: “both sides read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invoked His aid against the other.” 


    Read the full text here.


    For examples of the power of story, see these two examples:

    A personal and a human story of overcoming adversity via a classic from Deb's blog:

    Several story & case study examples of how to build agility in a volatile business climate:
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Via the highest office of the land, USA, change & progress is portrayed in ways that work and ways that do not, showing that storytelling and speeches are important to the leadership art of inspiration and influence.  ~  Deb


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    IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual

    IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    "To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks."


    Photo caption:  Preparing for the Google+ Hangout with the UN Secretary-General.


    Where One Door Closes:  I'm doing a Google+ hangout today to discuss setting up a blogging circle with friends nearby and in another time zone.  I maintain several relationships using Skype, Google+ hangout, Facebook and Pinterest.  


    The doors are opening to new methods not as bound by silos and other traditional organizational boundaries.  In business, conversational tools and collaborative tools, like PowerNoodle, a collaboration idea sharing tool, are becoming mainstream.


    _____________________


    There’s irony in an IBM report of how CEO’s are seeing their businesses changing, based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries...
    _____________________


    It's little wonder that CEO's are seeing the value of screen-time, even thought this well researched IBM study was conducted face-to-face.  The article from Formtek Blog has a title that is not as neutral:  ...Eroding the need for Face-to-Face in Business.   Yet it is hopeful.


    Some excerpts:


    There’s irony in the IBM report as the first page — contains only the words: “This study is based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries.”


    _____________________


    Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

    _____________________


    Several major findings:


    • CEO’s are seeing less value in face-to-face encounters and are increasingly pursuing social media and collaboration technologies for interacting with others.
    .
    • Over 50% [of the CEO's interviewed] expect social channels to be a primary way of engaging customers within five years.”

    .

    • 20% of CEO’s said that social media already is one of their most important forms of interaction with others

    .

    • 57% thought that within another 3-5 years social media would become important.

    .

    • Currently 80% see face-to-face interactions as very important today, that’s expected to slip to just 67 percent who will feel that way in 3-5 years.




    CEO’s are seeing collaboration increasingly as a tool that can be used to bring about team building and cooperation, allowing executives within the organization to work cross-functionally.


    Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.


    _____________________


    CEOs will need to learn from their own networks. They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios.

    _____________________


    Bridget van Kralingen, vice president of IBM Global Business Services, commented, ”Rather than ...de-personalising human relationships, this view leans heavily in favour of deepening them, and using dynamic social networks to harness collective intelligence to unlock new models of collaboration.”


    Pierre Morin a partner at IBM Global Business Services, said that “...they want people across the organization to feel comfortable reaching out to the CEO to share ideas or engage a discussion. Social media is a mechanism to do that.”


    The IBM report concludes that


    “To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks.


    They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios—with generational, geographic, institutional diversity. Then, they’ll need to help their organizations do the same.”


    Read the full post here.

    Photo credit:  Flickr, cc, by specialoperations

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    Newsjacked! Komen without a communications strategy allows the public to define the dialog

    Newsjacked! Komen without a communications strategy allows the public to define the dialog | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    It is a current, cautionary tale about social media timing.


    Communication strategies are a part of change  Regardless of where you may stand on the issues, once thing is clear from the Beth Katner post cited here - define the conversation, or your public will do it for you..


    The photo of PINK items on this post is being shared widely via Pinterest, Facebook an in other LARGE social media channels in protest to the Komen news about funding for breast cancer screening and Planned Parenthood.  


    Current update: 

    Planned Parenthood gains $650,000 in 24 hours, enough to replace the lost funding from the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Foundation.  Source:  The Washington Post

    From Beth's network, Kivi Leroux-Miller lays out a case study documenting the social media response and provided an analysis about why it happened. As Kivi says,


    Excerpted:


    “This is what happens when a leading nonprofit jumps into a highly controversial area of public debate without a communications strategy, stays silent, and therefore lets others take over the public dialogue, perhaps permanently redefining the organization and its brand."


    Watch and learn, so you don’t make the same mistake on whatever hot button issues your organization might be wading into.


    Kivi has also written about “newsjacking” the technique of piggy backing on a crisis to get more media attention.


    Kivi's blog post, featuring her newsjacking timely example, was about a lack of response by the Komen organization to a viral / big news story.    Sorry, regardless of your personal views of this situation, the BIG cautionary tale here is that ignoring social media only makes the situation worse.  Here's Kivi's newsjacking Komen story, to wit:

    • I really didn’t think about the newsjacking potential of the post until I got into writing the commentary, and decided to really call out Komen for the lack of responsiveness to their supporters. 
    • I knew it would be a good lesson for my blog readers, but then mid-morning, Komen posted on Facebook (but still not on Twitter), and I found the response to be really lacking given the outrage.
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    Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org

    Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
    A new white paper from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation shows sustained declines in business dynamism across a wide swath of the U.S. economy, including the high-tech sector that has been critical for sparking economic growth in recent decades.

       

    Click here to open a window to access the report.

        

    Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

        

           

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This post features the Kaufman report and ties into the previous ScoopIt by one of its co-authors explaining dynamism and its impact on the economy.  ~  D

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    Harvard B-School Dean offers Unusual Apology to Female Students & Professors

    Harvard B-School Dean offers Unusual Apology to Female Students & Professors | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
    Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria publicly apologized for the school's treatment of female students and professors and vowed to make changes at the school.




    Related tools from Deb:


              


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The New York Times has profiled, in depth, the experiment to change the culture & climate at Harvard's Business School, culminating with a female Baker's Scholar graduation speech not to be missed.   This sets a remarkable precedent in the year 2014.  ~  D

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    World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors

    World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    We need people who can execute ...including mastering acceleration.


    Elon Musk

    Recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article, Musk is compared to Steve Jobs, another visionary, and is then discussed as follows:


    Elon Musks's ambitions soar even higher...


    His electric-car company Tesla Motors aims to remake the way we drive, while the ultimate goal of his rocket company SpaceX, he said, is to travel to Mars and help build a self-sustaining base there.


    ______________________

    We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through...

    ______________________


    Skepticism?  ...each time Mr. Musk delivers a better, less-expensive electric car or launches another rocket successfully, he proves his doubters wrong.


    ...he co-founded a multibillion-dollar company called PayPal.


    ...Musk...taught himself to code and program software by the age of 12.


    After ...leaving a PhD program at Stanford, Musk dedicated himself to the three important problems that would most affect the future of humanity.  "One was the internet, one was clean energy, and one was space."


    All three are revolutionary spaces, and to work in all three most certainly requires an individual willing to completely reinvent himself and his expertise to change course as needed.


    We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through and don't even begin to master the competency of acceleration before they are onto the next thing.


    Related posts from Deb:

         



    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The Tesla story has elements of sensing the future that can be instructive for anyone in a change space including innovation.  ~  D

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:09 AM

    Originally posted on my Change Leadership Watch stream, it also is highly instructive to the innovation theme, especially with the lessons of staying-the-course with the new idea and execution.  ~ Deb

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    Signs of Changes Taking Hold in Electronics Factories in China

    Signs of Changes Taking Hold in Electronics Factories in China | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
    After the hardships of workers in China’s electronics factories were exposed to a global audience, working conditions have changed.
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    After FoxConn & Apple made front page news and were parodied for their treatment of workers, there is now a shift globally in investment for staff.  The bottom line and social resposibility have gone global. ~ D

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    Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study

    Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    "Change success:  Putting leadership development at the heart of a major operations-improvement effort paid off in BIG boost in income for a global industrial company."


    Once again, a smart leadership investment pays off during a major change implementation boosting income by about $1.5 billion a year.


    Excerpts from the case example:


    Too often senior executives overlook the “softer” skills their leaders will need to disseminate changes throughout the organization and make them stick. These skills include:

    • keeping managers and workers inspired when they feel overwhelmed, 
    • promoting collaboration across organizational boundaries, 
    • helping managers embrace change programs through dialogue, not dictation
    ______________________________
    The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders...
    ______________________________

    In this case example, drives for improvement carried a stigma of incompetence, current performance was considered “good enough”, and conflict tended to be passive-aggressive.  There was also a pervasive fear of making mistakes—reinforced by the company’s strong culture of safety and of risk aversion.

    The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders to master the personal behavioral changes needed to support the operational ones.


    The company mounted an intense, immersive, and individualized leadership program.  The results are still unfolding, but after three years the company estimates that the improvement program has already boosted annual pretax operating income by about $1.5 billion a year. Furthermore, executives see the new leadership behavior as crucial to that ongoing success.


    Read the full story here.

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