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4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership

4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

From the 3rd Results Oriented principle, Leader behaviors – McKinsey research helps us know what works best today. From the article: 

5 Strategies to Lead Change, Using Liberating Structures



Five key concepts and supporting research and tools will help you lead through adaptive change in a VUCA world, one that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous, as presented in Mexico City for CPA firm leaders at the Russell Bedford International conference, yet applicable for any leader.

 

 



Researchers showed that out of 20 distinct leadership traits identified in organizations whose leadership performance was strong, high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior.  These 4 behaviors explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness

1. Solving problems effectively.

2. Operating with a strong results orientation.

3. Seeking different perspectives.

4. Supporting others.

This is from the McKinsey Quarterly, first published in 1964, which now offers the perspective today that “much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant,” (Dobbs, 2014.) McKinsey forecasts a crash of:

1) technological disruption,

2) rapid emerging-markets growth, and

3) widespread aging as “long-held assumptions [give] way, and seemingly powerful business models [become] upended.”

Sound familiar? Are you ready? 

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New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures

New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Financial and demographic woes squeeze many institutions' bottom lines. But while predictions of mergers and consolidations proliferate, so too does evidence that combining colleges -- and even close collaboration -- is hard to pull off even when it seems to make good sense.

    

A new report from the TIAA-CREF Institute endorses the thesis that many higher education institutions will need to collaborate meaningfully to function well in the future, and that some of the traditional ways of working together -- like the many successful consortia that focus on joint services -- may not work for colleges that aren't close geographically or that seek more dramatic changes in their business models.


___________________________

   

...institutions should aim for ...a "sweet spot" ...flexible, sweeping, ...less threatening and risky than mergers...while retaining identities to h reduce costs and [raise] capacity...

___________________________

    

its author, Michael K. Thomas of the New England Board of Higher Education, also concedes that mergers are "challenging terrain" on which many would-be marriages can hit potholes -- or sinkholes.

     

Instead, the report argues that more institutions should aim for what Thomas calls a "sweet spot" that is more flexible and sweeping than most consortia but less threatening and risky than mergers: strategic alliances in which they merge some of their some administrative functions (while retaining their distinct identities and structures) to both reduce costs and give them more capacity than colleges would have on their own.


Read the full article here:  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    
     
      
    


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The commentary on this piece is useful, highlighting patterns including dealing with: 1) issues of college identity, 2) alternatives to the full four years (dual credit options, community colleges, badges), and 3) entrenched administrative overhead dispassionately - as one of the fastest rising costs, as it affects careers, amidst education disruption and adaptation.

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A new Structure, a new Culture at Microsoft. Why They May get Things Really Right

A new Structure, a new Culture at Microsoft. Why They May get Things Really Right | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"One Microsoft" is a good example of a strategy that meets today's challenges. Success will come from a HR innovation and cultural transformation, (DN) if they can make it work.


__________________________
     
What is a system favoring careerism worth if it’s to the detriment of the rest of the company, of customers, of stakeholders ? Nothing. 

__________________________

       

“One strategy, One Microsoft” : that’s how Steve Ballmer explained the urgency to move to a product based organization to a function based one involving all product lines in a cross-organization approach.


...The move from a divisional organization to a functional one is everything but easy. 

   

What is a system favoring careerism worth if it’s to the detriment of the rest of the company, of customers, of stakeholders ? Nothing. On the other hand a functional organization is customer and solution driven rather than product driven.


...there’s no better way to kill collaboration, cross-silos work and even innovation than strictly allocating resources on a silo-based fashion.

In short a divisional organization measures its own success, even to the detriment of customers and stakeholders, a functional one measures its success to the value and benefits it creates for others.


The full post is here.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

       

              

  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If they can make it work, it will be one of the biggest change and culture success stories of the decade.  The careerism quote above is a gem.  Time and customers will tell.  ~  D

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University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts

University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Conflict over governing the University of Virginia has become a proxy war in a much larger struggle over control of the nation’s public universities.


_____________________

“...these are very stressful times to be running a university,”
~ M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

_____________________

Around the country, waning state support, rising tuition and the competitive threat of online education have raised fears about the future of public universities.

Trustees and politicians in several states have increasingly flexed their muscles to influence university operations, leading to turf battles with presidents and chancellors who are largely used to having their way.


“In any sector that’s in the middle of stress and change, the relationships between C.E.O.’s and their boards gets more complicated, and these are very stressful times to be running a university,” said M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, who has held several high-level posts in business, government and academia, including president of Michigan State University and chairman of Dow Jones & Company.


He said board members who are executives in their own right are tempted, especially in challenging times, to shift from overseeing to hands-on managing.


Related posts by Deb:




Via Keith Hampson PhD
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This seems to be another sign of the deepening malaise in higher education~ the higher education bubble. Stress at the top may reflect stress all around in higher ed.


In my own circles, there is persistent unhappiness among many I know connected to the university system.  ~ D

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Sustainability is about Impact! The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come

Sustainability is about Impact!  The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"It's the double bottom line, baby!  ESPECIALLY if you are in non-profit leadership today."

  

I just heard Jeanne Bell, CEO and author of NonProfit Sustainability talk honestly about the double bottom line in her own business as well as in her consulting engagements.  Her fresh, tested perspective rings true.

  

In a nutshell:

  

  • ...in the mythic past it was possible to think first about strategic impact goals, and then about how to raise the money. ...today...you can't talk about what you're going to do without talking about how to get the money. And, you can't talk about how to get money without talking about what you're going to do.
  
_______________________
  
Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it.
_______________________
    
Here are some gems from her presentation today in Flint, Michigan as well as a great Scooped article by her.  Flint is an appropriate setting; it's a place that has seen hard times and where the BEST Funders Collaborative brings in stellar talent to keep non-profits doing what they do best.
     
  • Declare change as constant.
  • Model change by turning down money not headed in the right direction.  We have some agency over this – don’t have to jump to funders. "
  • Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it.
  • Use good tools, frameworks.
  • DO NOT confuse strategy and planning. 
_______________________
    
What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow.
_______________________
         
Excerpted gems from the article:
   
  • If the financial goal in a for-profit company is to maximize profit, should our goal as a nonprofit be to have $0 profit? Or should the goal be to grow an endowment of $10 million, or to have a surplus of 5%, or a deficit of no more than $50,000?
     
  • The financial goal of a nonprofit is to ensure that it has adequate working capital; that is, its financial goal is to have enough money to do its work over the long term. Today we often use the term sustainability...
     
  •  What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. ...We never arrive at a mix of programs and revenue streams that can be described as permanently sustainable. But we can always be heading in the right direction.
      
   
Read about Jeanne's dual bottom line here.   
   

Related to this, read Deb's article on strategic agility (the end of strategic planning) here.
      
Now I'm hearing Paul Saginaw, co-founder of the very successful Zingermans community of businesses in Ann Arbor talk about founding Food Gatherers, feeding the hungry in Ann Arbor.  Quite the point.
   
Photo above: Jeanne Bell, Steve Zimmerman and Jan Masaoka (left to right in photo) are all former nonprofit CFOs and they all appreciate the environmental aspects of sustainability as well. Jeanne is now CEO of CompassPoint Nonprofit Services.
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Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "


Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  


Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.


__________________________


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________


Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:


"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.


According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.


In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”


As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:


1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)


2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)


Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.


To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

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Want Cultural Change to Stick? Change The Way You Operate - Forbes

Want Cultural Change to Stick? Change The Way You Operate - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Do you want sustained cultural change ? Until the operations change, NOTHING will stick."


Yeah, yeah.  Change consultants know that cultural change can kickstart with organizational changes or strategic changes that look powerful & imply true change. But it is the work in the trenches, the operations changes that make the difference for going the distance.


____________________________


“Building a team that combined the old and the new was critical to our success."

____________________________


Excerpted, a few of the golden gems:


[Operations] is often the most difficult part of the change process because operations involve ingrained habits, practices, and systems.


It’s worth the effort because corporate culture is the only truly sustainable competitive advantage.  [DN:  I'd add leader behaviors for innovation, coaching & team collaboration support.]


From the Equifax case study:


“Building a team that combined the old and the new was critical to our success.


It was critical for me as a leader to not underestimate the people part, getting people to engage, be willing to support and sustain the change.


Strategy and execution has to be joined by a very strong psychological conversion of beliefs, from the old patterns to the new.” 

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Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast | Katzenbach Foresight, Booz & Co.

Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast | Katzenbach Foresight, Booz & Co. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The “Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast” webinar delivered on December 6, 2011, shares what Jon Katzenbach and Booz & Co. believe is the right approach for strategic success (Capabilities-Driven Strategy), why strong cultural support is essential, and how to work with and within your culture to execute your strategy. 

Jon Katzenbach is the author of the strategy+business article "Stop Blaming your Culture," and is featured on the video & in the webinar slides at this site.


The link also connects to the Foresight newsletter featuring:


  • Booz & Company’s seventh annual study of the world’s 1,000 largest corporate R&D spenders focuses on the ways strategic alignment and corporate culture facilitate innovation, and
  • How can you balance the logic of the formal with the magic of the informal?   The formal organization consists of analyses, strategies, structures, processes, and programs, all codified in memos and charts—tools that align decisions and actions.  The informal organization consists of emerging ideas, social networks, working norms, values, peer relationships, and communities of common interest—elements that are often hidden. It is in the informal world where magic happens. However, neither of the two organizations is likely to sustain peak performance without the other. 




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Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance

Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Like a well-played symphony, when nonprofit leaders partner well with their staff and volunteers, magic happens.  Leadership & Partnership in the nonprofit sector:"

_________________________


Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. 

_________________________
 

In this Part Two post from  “Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed The First Year on the Job," – co-authored with Jolene Knapp and Alan Davis, another Ideas for Action, LLC colleague, we offer solutions for nurturing a successful partnership.  Part One of the series recommended first steps of CEO listening and communicating with the specific titles of:


  1. Listen to learn
  2. Communicate, and communicate again

Below, we share details and links to resources on setting the leadership agenda as well as finding your rhythm with a new board chair or council president, as well as educating and encouraging volunteers.
 

_________________________

Co-creation is a powerful way to establish partnership.
_________________________

3. Set a Leadership Agenda

When things go wrong between CEOs and their boards, it’s often the result of a failure to reach a common understanding of what constitutes success. Co-create the new leadership agenda. One of the best tools we’ve seen is a simple but powerful template for articulating priorities and goals for the next 18 months, including the respective roles of the new leader, board, and senior staff in achieving them.   (See the Sample Leadership Agenda in this article from the Bridgespan Group.)


Do not overcommit yourself or your staff. Leaders, members, and other stakeholders are excited about a new CEO; they want projects or tasks implemented that may have been pending for a while or they have new ideas.


Establish a pattern of having strategic conversations with the board that set clear expectations about goals, roles, and ways to assess progress. In addition, it is important to assure that the chair/president is passing along information to the rest of the board.
 

4.  Establish a Rhythm for Building Shared Leadership with the Board Chair

In the complex world of governance, it’s important to find a communication pattern that builds solid leadership connection in your organization. One CEO we consulted said that in preparation for each new governance year, she facilitated an off-site leadership transition retreat with the incoming president, immediate past president, and new president-elect. (This will vary with the size and culture of your board.) In a private and relaxed setting, the goal was to orient the president-elect to current challenges, provide deep background on strategic priorities, and co-create a shared leadership vision for the year.


Related posts by Deb on Non-Profit Leadership in this series:

    

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Manish Puranik's curator insight, January 11, 2016 11:55 PM

'Listen to Learn' and 'Communicate, and communicate again' would prove the simplest mantra of this age, if used appropriately! 

Jaro Berce's curator insight, March 2, 2016 6:07 AM

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week

Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Does a 40+ hours a week actually work for today's and tomorrow's world?  Consider what would happen if we had a 20+ hour work week as the new standard?


________________
   
Society seems to be in denial over this...  ~ Brian Dean

________________


Excerpted:

U.K.-based writer Brian Dean argues that we need to reframe the idea of work itself—and maybe replace it with "antiwork" instead. He explains:
 

"Antiwork is a moral alternative to the obsession with "jobs" that has plagued our society for too long. It’s a project to radically reframe work and leisure. It’s also a cognitive antidote to the pernicious culture of "hard work," which has taken over our minds as well as our precious time."

________________

    

"The global economic collapse wasn’t caused by human idleness, and neither were the previous recessions." 

   

________________


Twenty years ago, Jeremy Rifkin estimated that about 75% of jobs in industrialized countries included tasks that could be at least partially automated, and as artificial intelligence and engineering improves, that number keeps getting higher.


"Society seems to be in denial over this, to a large extent," Dean says.

"So, we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."
 

If we don't work, how will we pay rent?  Dean supports the idea of unconditional basic income—a system in which society pays everyone enough to meet basic needs, so we can all spend our time doing something that truly fulfills us.

   

Related change posts by Deb on Reveln:
    

       

 

Deb's related ScoopIt streams:

    

    

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

So the 20-30 hour work week rises again.  Frithjof Bergman, at the University of Michigan,  suggested it for society decades ago.  Perhaps now with the pain of income disparity, the speed of technological advances including communication, it can be taken more seriously.

Excerpted from the interview referenced below:  

Frithjof:   New Work represents the effort to redirect the use of technology so that it isn’t used simply to speed up the work and in the process ruin the world – turning rivers into sewers and rain into acid.
     

The purpose of technology should be to reduce the oppressive, spirit-breaking, dementing power of work – to use machines to do the work that is boring and repetitive. Then human beings can do the creative, imaginative, uplifting work.
      

So New Work is simply the attempt to allow people, for at least some of their time, to do something they passionately want to do, something they deeply believe in.   ~ Deb

   

Reference:  http://www.context.org/iclib/ic37/bergmann/

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Solid Systems: A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values

Solid Systems:  A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"A rare CEO personal phone call:  After making a customer complaint, I received a phone call from the CEO of Jiffy mix, the top producer of baking mixes in America."


While Jiffy competes by selling quality products at the lowest price (40 to 60 cents for corn muffins, for example), most American companies now try to sell their products by making people feel inadequate. 


Many of our best and brightest minds shuffle paper and money ...to earn big salaries, while the real creators of wealth — bakers, builders, farmers, inventors, teachers, designers, and doctors are loaded down by debt.

Jiffy mix is a welcome trend-breaker.

According to CEO Holmes, "Our staff puts more emphasis on internal and external relationships than we do on completing tasks. This is very different from most companies ... Our dedication to strong family business values, combined with real world professionalism has us uniquely situated for the 21st Century."


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Michigan based Jiffy Mix will have to fend with GMO issues & carb reduction in the future.  Yet today they know where their core audience is and where they are going.  In the end, business is still all about sustainability, relationships and not just the short term bottom line. ~  Deb

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Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:


__________________

Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years
.

__________________


...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!


A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 


...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.


Related posts by Deb:


     

   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

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It's got to be about Why, not How: How Great Leaders Inspire Action, Simon Sinek

"Why FIRST:  Communication and the Golden Circle:  Why, How, What?  Inspire where others do not.  Profit is JUST a result NOT a reason for existing."


Simon's examples include Apple (why so innovative?), Martin Luther King (lead major change, Civil Rights movement), and the Wright brothers (controlled powered manned flight that others did not achieve, tho' were working on.)


_________________________

   

"The goal is to do business with people who believe what YOU believe." ~ Simon Sinek

_________________________

   


Apple:  NOT, What we do, great computers.  Want to buy one?

RATHER:  Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use & user friendly.  We happen to make computers.  Want to buy one?


Counterpoint Tivo, which (until a recent court victory that tripled its stock price) appeared to be struggling.  

   

http://www.ted.com Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" 


Source here.


More about Deb's world is here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats 

Presentation Videos - Change Results
Deb's mothership: The REVELN website



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Robin Martin's comment, May 11, 2013 12:39 PM
Thanks Deb!
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Achieving a Sustainable, Virtuous Cycle of Strategic Change & Transformation in High Performance Businesses

Achieving a Sustainable, Virtuous Cycle of Strategic Change & Transformation in High Performance Businesses | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Few companies decide to adopt new strategies without being forced to by financial trauma. What can we learn from those rare companies that achieve both successful major change and superior long-term financial performance?


Excerpted research includes:


Cadbury Schweppes, Tesco and Smith & Nephew all displayed the rare combination of making strategic transformations and, at the same time, achieving strong performance year after year for 20 years relative to industry peers around the world.


FINDINGS

  • Successful transformers build alternative coalitions internally.
  • They create a tradition of constructively challenging the status quo.
  • They exploit “happy accidents” to make needed strategic changes.
Sloan's goal was to draw insights from the small subset of high performers that successfully transformed themselves. Among other things, they wanted to understand the role of history — for example, which management processes and capabilities do companies need to develop over time.
.
Together, these advantages helped them establish the virtuous cycle of strategic transformation that their counterparts could not. (See “A Virtuous Cycle for Strategic Transformation.”)
.
Source:  Achieving Successful Strategic Transformation
By Gerry Johnson, George S. Yip and Manuel Hensmans
Photo Credit:  MIT Sloan Management Review, March 20, 2012
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Newsjacked! Komen without a communications strategy allows the public to define the dialog

Newsjacked! Komen without a communications strategy allows the public to define the dialog | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It is a current, cautionary tale about social media timing.


Communication strategies are a part of change  Regardless of where you may stand on the issues, once thing is clear from the Beth Katner post cited here - define the conversation, or your public will do it for you..


The photo of PINK items on this post is being shared widely via Pinterest, Facebook an in other LARGE social media channels in protest to the Komen news about funding for breast cancer screening and Planned Parenthood.  


Current update: 

Planned Parenthood gains $650,000 in 24 hours, enough to replace the lost funding from the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Foundation.  Source:  The Washington Post

From Beth's network, Kivi Leroux-Miller lays out a case study documenting the social media response and provided an analysis about why it happened. As Kivi says,


Excerpted:


“This is what happens when a leading nonprofit jumps into a highly controversial area of public debate without a communications strategy, stays silent, and therefore lets others take over the public dialogue, perhaps permanently redefining the organization and its brand."


Watch and learn, so you don’t make the same mistake on whatever hot button issues your organization might be wading into.


Kivi has also written about “newsjacking” the technique of piggy backing on a crisis to get more media attention.


Kivi's blog post, featuring her newsjacking timely example, was about a lack of response by the Komen organization to a viral / big news story.    Sorry, regardless of your personal views of this situation, the BIG cautionary tale here is that ignoring social media only makes the situation worse.  Here's Kivi's newsjacking Komen story, to wit:

  • I really didn’t think about the newsjacking potential of the post until I got into writing the commentary, and decided to really call out Komen for the lack of responsiveness to their supporters. 
  • I knew it would be a good lesson for my blog readers, but then mid-morning, Komen posted on Facebook (but still not on Twitter), and I found the response to be really lacking given the outrage.
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