Change Leadership Watch
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How change happens and who is leading it.  For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Your Team Can Smell a Rat

Your Team Can Smell a Rat | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Let’s call him Frank.He seemed so sincere, so talented, so driven. When I met him on a business trip—my former CEO and I—I liked him right away. ...Seemed like a great fit."


The CEO and I didn’t listen to our subject matter experts. We thought we knew better.


Frank was a disaster. He one of the most self-absorbed and devious people I’ve ever worked with. Because of the benevolent nature of our organization I was working for at the time, it took us years to untangle the mess we had gotten into, and by then he’d done serious damage to our team’s reputation—not to mention motivation and productivity.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One of the author's more recent book is, All In: How the Best Managers Create a Culture of Belief and Drive Big Results,  It features solid research and good examples of the impact of culture on success, so he knows from this single example of "the rat" to company wide culture change on what makes a difference.  


From one reviewer:   In a healthy culture....those who share it are nourished by mutual respect and trust. It is no coincidence that most of the companies that are annually ranked [as] most admired and best to work for are also annually ranked among those that are most profitable and have the greatest cap value in their respective industries.    ~  D

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John Michel's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:50 PM

A great lesson in hoy leaders would listen to their team before making  key hires.

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!
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What Behavior Characteristics Do the Best Change Leaders Exhibit? | Daryl Conner

What Behavior Characteristics Do the Best Change Leaders Exhibit? | Daryl Conner | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

How can you be fully prepared to help assess senior-level leaders for change roles?


Daryl Conner, one of the earliest practitioners, author and consultancy for the modern change management practice, is sharing gems in a 2 part series about change leader behaviors.


__________________________


...surfacing obstacles and addressing risks are inherent

to successfully managing change

__________________________


The lists of Leader behaviors are useful references when looking at the leader case studies and examples on this curation stream.


Here are some excerpts from Daryl's 2 part series:

.

  • Approaches change as a process rather than an event
  • Guards the most important change priorities
  • Matches responsibility with authority when assigning change-related tasks/roles
.

                     - Ensures people understand that surfacing

                        obstacles and addressing risks are inherent

                        to successfully managing change

      

                     - Instills a culture where problems that are       

                       surfaced and mitigated early are seen in a positive

                       light, rather than as something to be hidden 

                        

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson

How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

There is nothing more important for a business than hiring the right team. If you get the perfect mix of people working for your company, you have a far greater chance of success."


Excerpted:

Personality is the key. It is not something that always comes out in interview – people can be shy.....It is easier with an extrovert, but be wary of people becoming overexcited in the pressure of interviews.


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Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. 

________________________


You can learn most jobs extremely quickly once you are thrown in the deep end. Within three months you can usually know the ins and outs of a role. If you are satisfied with the personality, then look at experience and expertise.


Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. While specialists are sometimes necessary, versatility should not be underestimated.


Related posts by Deb:
     

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

      

Beyond Resilience: Black Swans, Anti-Fragility and Change

       

Using Jung to Clarify the Power of Introversion and Extroversion in Coaching

 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes!  Starting with personality, then transferable skills and fit into culture (read, the BIG team) makes such a difference, yet does not fit our hiring patterns that are often about fitting into a template of past skill categories.   

Sir Richard Branson's piece also highly resonantes with his LinkedIn audience based on the commentary.   He moves credentials MUCH further down on the list.

This is from a successful entrepreneur who knows failure.  He did not succeed in his first two businesses, selling Christmas Trees and parakeets (really.) From there he rose from work at a record shop, to Virgin Records in the 1970s to a large network of businesses including Virgin Galactic in 2012.
 

"A business has to be involving, it has to be fun, and it has to exercise your creative instincts." ~ Richard Branson

~  Deb 


PS:  One of the comments, "Can I work for you?"  :-)

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:03 AM

Originally posted in Change  Leadership Watch, this post gives great pointers on what really matters when YOU decide where you best fit and can contribute.  ~  D

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UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job

UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Josh James, Founder and CEO of Domo; Author of Startup Rules responds to ~ The Case for Hiring “Under Qualified" by digging deeper into his hiring philosophy & success.  He's also the all-star executive who also co-founded Omniture and took it from inception to IPO to sale for $1.8B to Adobe


Assessments don't catch what Josh James is talking about, the renegades, the untested, as well as the angry ones who have something to prove.  In that light, Josh James proves how one of his rules shows the limits of the others. - Deb

______________________________

  

#45:  No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, currently employed candidates who won’t leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________


Excerpts:

Josh James's response to "Dave, Dave, Dave..." in Forbes focusing on his Rule 45: "No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, Currently Employed Candidates Who Won’t Leave… PERFECT.”

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...a handful of my executives ...had been fired from their previous job. They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong...that I couldn’t resist.

______________________________


I’ve always believed that hiring people with untapped potential can serve as a tremendous accelerant to your business. This is something I learned very early on in my career and has been a staple of my hiring and promoting decisions throughout the course of running my businesses. 

______________________________

  

...hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated...

______________________________


[However], if you were faced with hiring 10 employees who were terminated for one reason or another, or hiring 10 employees who were top-rated, currently employed individuals who didn’t want to initially even interview, then I think the latter group would prove to contain dramatically more successful individuals 90% of the time.

That said, a handful of my executives at Omniture who had been fired from their previous job.  

  • They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong (another one of my rules: hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated), that I couldn’t resist.  


...We have an obligation to the rest of our employees and their families to ensure we have a world-class, globally competitive company.  In order to do that, I want to stack the cards in our favor as much as possible.  Capitalism isn’t always nice.

If you look at my other rules, (DN:  In his list of 55 Start-Up Rules) you’ll notice number 46:

  

  • There are exceptions to every rule and to the extent you make the exceptions, you accept greater risk, but you can also receive greater reward.  

   
In that vein, my startup rule number 20 (also found at http://www.joshjames.com) speaks to that, about hiring the underprivileged and undeserved, who, although they haven’t had the best chances yet, they have the gumption, desire, and enthusiasm and are just waiting for the right person to believe in them.

Half of my management team at Omniture and already half of the leaders who have received promotions at Domo are people who were or are learning on the job.  

We are chock full of people whom I have my eye on and who are killing it in their positions. 

They will deserve and receive promotions down the road despite their lack of a been-there-done-that resume. They have the intangibles.  (DN: That don't show up on assessments, necessarily.)

And by the way, we’re hiring.  - Josh James

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