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Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last

Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research confirms what they say about nice guys...[or at least the result is a lot more nuanced that it seems.


________________________

   

Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers.

________________________


Excerpted:

We have some well-worn aphorisms…courtesy of Machiavelli (“It is far better to be feared than loved”), Dale Carnegie (“Begin with praise and honest appreciation”), and Leo Durocher (who may or may not have actually said “Nice guys finish last”). More recently, books like The Power of Nice and The Upside of Your Dark Side have continued in the same vein: long on certainty, short on proof.

     

So it was a breath of fresh air when, in 2013, there appeared a book that brought data into the debate. The author, Adam Grant, is a 33-year-old Wharton professor, and his best-selling book, Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success, offers evidence that “givers”—people who share their time, contacts, or know-how without expectation of payback—dominate the top of their fields. “This pattern holds up across the board,” Grant wrote—from engineers in California to salespeople in North Carolina to medical students in Belgium. …[T]he book appears to have swung the tide of business opinion toward the happier, nice-guys-finish-first scenario.

   

And yet suspicions …remain—fueled, in part, by …Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson.  …Since Steve Jobs was published in 2011, “I think I’ve had 10 conversations where CEOs have looked at me and said, ‘Don’t you think I should be more of an asshole?’” says Robert Sutton, a professor of management at Stanford, whose book, The No Asshole Rule, nonetheless includes a chapter titled “The Virtues of Assholes.”

    

In Grant’s framework, the mentor in this story would be classified as a “taker,” which brings us to a major complexity in his findings. Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers. It’s a nuance that’s often lost in the book’s popular rendering.

   

…[M]anagement professor Donald Hambrick, of Penn State [knows] academic psychology’s definition of narcissism—a trait Hambrick measured in CEOs and then plotted against the performance of their companies, in a 2007 study with Arijit Chatterjee.

…Hambrick…chose a set of indirect measures: the prominence of each CEO’s picture in the company’s annual report; the size of the CEO’s paycheck compared with that of the next-highest-paid person in the company; the frequency with which the CEO’s name appeared in company press releases. Lastly, he looked at the CEO’s use of pronouns in press interviews, comparing the frequency of the first-person plural with that of the first-person singular. Then he rolled all the results into a single narcissism indicator.
 

How did the narcissists fare? Hambrick …ound that the narcissists were like Grant’s givers: they clustered near both extremes of the success spectrum.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The humility and selflessness of Collin's Level 5 leadership, as well as Professor Adam Grant's important work on Givers, Takers and Matchers shows a nuance about timing and intensity.  It seems giving can include a goodly portion of challenge and dominance, among the expectation of the group surveyed.   Collins describes Level 5 leaders as those in whom genuine personal humility blends with intense professional will.  Perhaps intensity is a key description for those leaders.  


NOTE that:

..."In at least three situations, a touch of jerkiness can be helpful.

1) ...if your job, or [an] element of it, involves a series of onetime encounters in which reputational blowback has minimal effect.
    

2) The second is in that evanescent moment [when] group has formed but its hierarchy has not.


Finally

[3 The third—not fully explored here, but worth mentioning—is when the group’s survival is in question, speed is essential, and a paralyzing existential doubt is in the air."  


(Numbering added by Deb)   

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Kudos's curator insight, July 21, 2015 11:56 AM

This is a really good article. I am not sure what does work best. But you are who you are. You are a jerk or you are a nice guy or girl but you can learn the competencies that will make you and your company successful if you tend to have nicer tendencies.

 

What I took away at the end of the article is you need these qualities to be a great leader:

Confidence
Competence
Expertise
Initiative
Passion
Vision

 

If you want people to follow you - you need to show people you care about success. People want to follow a winner.

 

You do not need to be a Jerk or Narcissist to get results but you need to be tough, direct and challenge people when it is appropriate to get results. Then appreciate them and give them Kudos when they do well. You then will develop shared behaviours that will make the whole company successful. Disagreeable Givers is a great term and worth striving for.

 

My favourite part was the Steve Jobs argument. He was a jerk and a narcissist and built a great company we all admire. But his Jerk tendencies got him fired and it was his kinder gentler self after he reflected on things in his exile that lead to his ultimate success on his return. He was a better leader when he came back. A little less of a total jerk and he actually did praise when appropriate and gave credit where credit was due. But he still pushed people relentlessly and they respected him for that because of the spill over effect. By him doing well, the whole team and company did well. He had the above qualities.

 

If he was the only one that did well - seeking money, prestige and acclaim - he would have been exiled again and the Apple would have failed. Hard to even imagine. But the question you have to ask - was his jerk behaviour the reason for the success or was Appel and Jobs successful despite his narcissistic tendencies? Hmmmm?

 

There are wartime CEO's and Peace time CEO's and they need to act differently to be successful based on the circumstances. Steve jobs was a very good wartime CEO.

 

But follow the rules of engagement and you will be successful all the time.

 

 

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Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, 2015 Edition of What's Next, at University of Michigan #Flow

Slides and Notes from a public evening lecture by Mihaly Csikszentmihaly in Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday April 17th, 2015

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Bestselling Author of “Flow”
Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management

at Claremont Graduate University
Quality of Life Research Center

(4448 East Hall, 5:30-6:30 PM Plenary Lecture)
    

Topic: Curiosity and enjoyment as moderating factors in socio-cultural evolution

       

He mentioned this quote early in his presentation and cites it often in his presentations in general:

     

To establish a place of work where engineers can feel the joy of technological innovation, be aware of their mission to society, and work to their heart’s content.” ~ Masaru Ibuka, Sony founder electronics inventor Masaru Ibuka, in explaining the purpose of incorporation of Sony

   
Quotes I found relevant after hearing his presentation:

   
“Most enjoyable activities are not natural; they demand an effort that initially one is reluctant to make. But once the interaction starts to provide feedback to the person's skills, it usually begins to be intrinsically rewarding.”
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience
    

“Enjoyment appears at the boundary between boredom and anxiety, when the challenges are just balanced with the person's capacity to act.”

    
“the self expands through acts of self forgetfulness.”

    
“...It is when we act freely, for the sake of the action itself rather than for ulterior motives, that we learn to become more than what we were.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

   
Friday April 17th, 2015
Public Evening Lecture by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Bestselling Author of “Flow” (4448 East Hall, no registration required) 5:00-5:30 PM Welcome, Introductions: Stephanie Preston


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

His presentation was, in many ways, traditional, academic, with the customary rows of seated listeners.  Yet his later slides reflect the opening up of the big principles core learning of what flow is and how people from all walks of life, with less regard for wealth, achieve it through choice, even with varying degrees of freedom available to themselves.

   

One person who talked of the presentation said he could have sat there listening for hours.
      
Web research on Flow also brings flow explorers to topics like human chemistry and human thermodynamics, as well as to the broader field of positive psychology. It is a long way from industrial age, mechanistic thinking of the 20th century.  I cannot help but be inspired by it to learn more and find more ways of applying it in my own life and work.  ~  Deb

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Daniel Kahneman Revolutionized the Way we Think and Decide

Daniel Kahneman Revolutionized the Way we Think and Decide | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Thinking, Fast and Slow was a global bestseller, and had a profound impact on psychology and economics, as these tributes from other leading figures show.

_____________________

   

...human nature saddles us with some unfortunate limitations...we have the means to overcome...some of [them]...

   

_____________________

      

His central message could not be more important, namely, that human reason left to its own devices is apt to engage in a number of fallacies and systematic errors.   ...better decisions ...[come from]...aware[ness] of these biases and seek[ing] workarounds. That's a powerful and important discovery.


...Steven Pinker [author of this post] taught his research for more than 30 years   ....Our minds do not naturally process statistics on incidents of violence, and so Kahneman helps explain why my claim is news or why it's hard for people to believe.


....We have our differences. I think he is a pessimist, whereas I am an optimist. ...human nature saddles us with some unfortunate limitations, ...he ....shows in the "slow thinking" part of his book – that we have the means to overcome some of our limitations, through education, through institutions, through enlightenment. ....gradually, bit by bit, with two steps forward, one step back, I think that our better angels can push back against our limitations and flaws.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've read the book, re-read it, and will keep re-reading it until my mind grasps the pervasive magical thinking in our business systems and daily habits.  Simple improved awareness is a way to awaken sense-making in our daily decision making.  I like to post items like this to help us "see" the dangers of the status quo at work.  ~  D

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High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014

High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Surprising news:  New firms account for a smaller share of the tech sector than in previous decades. > HBR Blog & a recent Kaufman report.


____________________________
   
....the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. 

     

____________________________

        

America’s high-tech sector has become less dynamic and less entrepreneurial in the last decade via  a recent Kauffman Foundation report writer Ian Hathaway co-authored.


...The high-tech sector is experiencing a consolidation of activity away from young firms into more mature ones, and the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. ....high-tech companies have been well-represented among the fastest growing firms in the past few years, the high-tech sector–like the rest of the economy–is less dynamic overall.



____________________________
     
....Business dynamism involves...new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.

   
____________________________
   


...Business dynamism involves measuring ...businesses ...being formed, growing, shrinking, and closing....churning: jobs are created while others are destroyed, and some workers move into new roles as others seek to replace them. New and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.


...Entrepreneurs also play an outsized role in new job creation. While older and larger firms account for the substantial majority of employment levels, new and growing young firms drive net new job creation overall.


....Research has firmly established that this process of “creative destruction” fuels productivity growth, making it indispensable to our sustained economic prosperity. ...a more dynamic economy is a key to higher growth.


Read the full blog post here


Photo credit, thenext28days on Flickr, ccc.

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

     

      

       

.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The business dynamism or creative dynamism of which Ian Hathaway speaks seems has a kinship to Anti-Fragile concepts, especially, how  "new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones."  ~  D

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Entrepreneurs Reframe Failure as Intentional Iteration - Adapt the Idea & Live?

Entrepreneurs Reframe Failure as Intentional Iteration - Adapt the Idea & Live? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Failure.  It’s a harsh word.  No one enjoys failure.  No one ever really says, “Hey, I really want to fail today so I can learn.”  

Yet failure is an inevitable part of human existence and it plays a central role in the mindset of an entrepreneur.  Without failure there is little forward progress; without failure innovation is rather incremental; without failure there is no reason to celebrate success.

Entrepreneurs are taught to embrace and expect failure because the entrepreneurial path is rarely smooth or predictable.  Failure in this context, however, is not business failure.  Who wants that?  The fear of business failure paralyzes even the best potential entrepreneurs. 

Failure in the entrepreneurial vernacular is reframed as intentional iteration and experimentation.  It’s not failure in the catastrophic sense.  Failure is simply a portfolio of setbacks, false starts, wrong turns, and mistakes that are expected and tolerated because the entrepreneur purposefully iterates in order to gather new, relevant, and timely information. 


_______________________

There is one fundamental truth in entrepreneurship.  All ideas change.

__________________________


Through iteration entrepreneurs seek not to kill an idea but to make it better, and this happens through an anticipated cycle of pivoting and adapting.
 


There is one fundamental truth in entrepreneurship.  All ideas change.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Failure vs. Iteration?  Yes, makes sense to me.


However,  I just attended an interdisciplinary lecture by Professor Howard E. Aldrich referencing his paper, Lost In Translation: Celebrating Entrepreneurship While Acknowledging Its Costs.  I was stymied that he was posing this question at the end of his lecture as a policy question:  Too many entrepreneurs or too many failures?

His line of thinking is based on the high 5 year failure rate, 50%, of entrepreneurial businesses.    In my own town, the Ann Arbor Observer monthly journal posts a success / failure rate of local businesses in its business roundup.


A student asked, at the end of the lecture, "Too many marriages or too many divorces?"   His question gets closer to the gist of the curious framing of professor Aldrich's work.  


Aldrich offers that his research includes that entrepreneurs try a business idea once, and if the business fails, they do not try again.   Really?   I don't see this line of research ~ fail once and that's it ~ mentioned in the companion article for the ICOS lecture that was held at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.  I will look into this further in due time.  If you have a resource, please share!  ~  Deb


Reference:    http://icos.umich.edu/sites/icos6.cms.si.umich.edu/files/lectures/SEJ%20lost%20in%20translation.pdf 

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!
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IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual

IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks."


Photo caption:  Preparing for the Google+ Hangout with the UN Secretary-General.


Where One Door Closes:  I'm doing a Google+ hangout today to discuss setting up a blogging circle with friends nearby and in another time zone.  I maintain several relationships using Skype, Google+ hangout, Facebook and Pinterest.  


The doors are opening to new methods not as bound by silos and other traditional organizational boundaries.  In business, conversational tools and collaborative tools, like PowerNoodle, a collaboration idea sharing tool, are becoming mainstream.


_____________________


There’s irony in an IBM report of how CEO’s are seeing their businesses changing, based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries...
_____________________


It's little wonder that CEO's are seeing the value of screen-time, even thought this well researched IBM study was conducted face-to-face.  The article from Formtek Blog has a title that is not as neutral:  ...Eroding the need for Face-to-Face in Business.   Yet it is hopeful.


Some excerpts:


There’s irony in the IBM report as the first page — contains only the words: “This study is based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries.”


_____________________


Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

_____________________


Several major findings:


  • CEO’s are seeing less value in face-to-face encounters and are increasingly pursuing social media and collaboration technologies for interacting with others.
.
  • Over 50% [of the CEO's interviewed] expect social channels to be a primary way of engaging customers within five years.”

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  • 20% of CEO’s said that social media already is one of their most important forms of interaction with others

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  • 57% thought that within another 3-5 years social media would become important.

.

  • Currently 80% see face-to-face interactions as very important today, that’s expected to slip to just 67 percent who will feel that way in 3-5 years.




CEO’s are seeing collaboration increasingly as a tool that can be used to bring about team building and cooperation, allowing executives within the organization to work cross-functionally.


Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.


_____________________


CEOs will need to learn from their own networks. They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios.

_____________________


Bridget van Kralingen, vice president of IBM Global Business Services, commented, ”Rather than ...de-personalising human relationships, this view leans heavily in favour of deepening them, and using dynamic social networks to harness collective intelligence to unlock new models of collaboration.”


Pierre Morin a partner at IBM Global Business Services, said that “...they want people across the organization to feel comfortable reaching out to the CEO to share ideas or engage a discussion. Social media is a mechanism to do that.”


The IBM report concludes that


“To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks.


They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios—with generational, geographic, institutional diversity. Then, they’ll need to help their organizations do the same.”


Read the full post here.

Photo credit:  Flickr, cc, by specialoperations

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Leadership Teams: Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry

Leadership Teams:  Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Factors that truly differentiate top firms. It's the leader teams!

Recently, the Focus Consulting Group surveyed more than 100 asset management firms around the world, testing both for the strength of their cultures and for the effectiveness of their leadership teams....


Excerpts:


Of the investment professionals we surveyed, fully 94% agree with the statement: "Culture is important to our firm's success." Why do they think so? For them, the key benefit is "effective decision making." Both are interesting findings from an industry often seen as celebrating lone geniuses and superstars.


The same "elite" six firms that demonstrated superior cultures also posted senior leadership teamwork scores that are significantly higher than average. In particular, they distinguished themselves from the rest of the investment industry on five dimensions.


Source:  http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/04/where_teamwork_thrives_in_the.html?awid=9186393578493521766-3271



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How Leaders Lose Their Luck, the Paradox of the Journey to the Top

How Leaders Lose Their Luck, the Paradox of the Journey to the Top | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

While researching his forthcoming book — Heart, Smarts, Guts, and Luck — co-author Anthony Tjan made a fascinating discovery: a surprising number of company founders and business-builders attribute much of their success to luck.

...


There are ways that leaders create their own luck, as listed on the innovation leadership companion post on Innovations & Institutions, Will it Blend. Becoming disconnected on the way to the top, as co-author Anthony Tjan describes, is one way for leaders to lose their luck.


Excerpted:


Almost 25% of those we surveyed came out as "luck-dominant" on the Entrepreneurial Aptitude Test we devised; many more gave luck at least partial credit.


...Here's the paradox:  Once they have made it to the top — after they've reached high levels of entrepreneurial or corporate success — leaders often become disconnected from the crucial lucky qualities and relationships that helped get them there in the first place. By definition, the top is less of a journey and more of an arrival point. A newfound reputation is difficult to risk.


We've identified seven attributes, and they are among the most difficult ones for leaders to master and maintain. They are: humility, intellectual curiosity, optimism, vulnerability, authenticity, generosity, and openness.


The post defines these and begs the question:


How do leaders reconnect to the reality, attitude, and relationships that can sustain and take their company's excellence to a new place?


Author:  Anthony Tjan is CEO, Managing Partner and Founder of the venture capital firm Cue Ball and vice chairman of the advisory firm Parthenon.

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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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4 Leader Behaviors that drive 89% of Effectiveness. Why Org Health Matters | McKinsey

4 Leader Behaviors that drive 89% of Effectiveness. Why Org Health Matters | McKinsey | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

ip McKinsey's recent research points to a small subset of leadership skills that closely correlates with leadership success, particularly among frontline leaders. McKinsey came up with a comprehensive list of 20 distinct leadership traits, surveyed 189,000 people in 81 diverse organizations around the world to assess how frequently certain kinds of leadership behavior are applied within their organizations. Finally, they divided the sample into organizations whose leadership performance was strong (the top quartile of leadership effectiveness as measured by McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index) and those that were weak (bottom quartile).
    

What McKinsey found was that leaders in organizations with high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior; these 4, indeed, explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness (exhibit).

     

Four kinds of behavior account for 89 percent of leadership effectiveness.

    

  • Solving problems effectively. The process that precedes decision making is problem solving, when information is gathered, analyzed, and considered. This is deceptively difficult to get right, yet it is a key input into decision making for major issues (such as M&A) as well as daily ones (such as how to handle a team dispute).
         
  • Operating with a strong results orientation. Leadership is about not only developing and communicating a vision and setting objectives but also following through to achieve results. Leaders with a strong results orientation tend to emphasize the importance of efficiency and productivity and to prioritize the highest-value work.
          
  • Seeking different perspectives. ...monitors trends affecting organizations, grasps changes in the environment, encourages employees to contribute ideas that could improve performance, accurately differentiate between important and unimportant issues, and gives the appropriate weight to stakeholder concerns. Leaders who do well on this dimension typically base their decisions on sound analysis and avoid the many biases to which decisions are prone.
         
  • Supporting others. Leaders who are supportive understand and sense how other people feel. By showing authenticity and a sincere interest in those around them, they build trust and inspire and help colleagues to overcome challenges. They intervene in group work to promote organizational efficiency, allaying unwarranted fears about external threats and preventing the energy of employees from dissipating into internal conflict.

   

From McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index research:  The ...presence, at all ...levels, of talented, high-potential leaders ...is essential to create something from nothing.

While most organizations use career opportunities to motivate employees, companies in this cluster use career opportunities as a leadership-development practice. Role modeling and real experience are more important than passing along sage lessons.
   

Related leadership posts:

   
    

                                                   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

McKinsey offers insights on where to pivot the time you put into leadership development including the 4 behaviors as well as 4 recipes associated with sustained success.  Want to create change and "something from nothing?"  
    
Then read McKinsey's take (from the Index research) on the four "distinct underlying approach to managing, including core beliefs about value creation and what drives organizational success."  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 1, 6:44 PM

Four leadership behaviors that drive 89 percent of the difference between strong and weak organizations is worth a CLOSE look.  ~  Deb

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Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That.

Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research show how these top executives have taken charge of their careers.

     

It’s the responsibility of management to tackle gender diversity..[and]… evidence suggests that our leaders aren’t doing a very good job of it, at least not yet.


________________
 

[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program. 

________________

     

Women still represent less than 5% of CEOs around the globe, and they remain seriously underrepresented in other top management positions and on executive boards.

     

[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program.  … Lauren Ready concluded [this] from a study she did here at the International Consortium for Executive Development Research, in which she interviewed 60 top female executives from around the world to learn how they rose to the top.

   

For one, these executives take the time to explore what they want out of work and life [photo, chart.]

One byproduct…they pay special attention to how they might fit within a company’s culture.

    

This finding is consistent with research from Harvard professor Boris Groysberg, who’s found that while the performance of male stars falters when they switch companies, women continue to excel, in part because they’ve done their homework when it comes to fit.

   

The women in Ready’s study also understand the limits of fit. They aren’t “one of the guys” and they don’t try to be.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's still a man's world in the executive ranks, even in the college town where I live, the land of start-ups, women sparsely populate the fast growing, entrepreneurial executive ranks.  


It is also good to reach that the qualities listed in Ready's research among high-achieving women includes the urge to bring other women along with them.   It's a way ambitious women can "lean it" with a little help from her friends in high places, for the savvy reason that the executives "view [it] as a way to raise their companies’ market value, by boosting the presence of women in senior roles and in boardrooms."  


This brings hope that leadership will someday represent the world, rather than tradition and history in the leadership ranks.  ~  D 

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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, April 14, 2014 1:02 AM

There is sexism in the workplace, and I'll do my best to keep it out of my future classroom. I think that feminism has the potential to be taken overboard, by way of radicals, and that a 'humanism' is a better approach. Equality is obviously better than some of the superiority complexes associated with oppression ideologies gone awry; something I hope doesn't happen to feminism in the coming years as we combat this women-don't-riseto-the-top trend.

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Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org

Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
A new white paper from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation shows sustained declines in business dynamism across a wide swath of the U.S. economy, including the high-tech sector that has been critical for sparking economic growth in recent decades.

   

Click here to open a window to access the report.

    

Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

    

       

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post features the Kaufman report and ties into the previous ScoopIt by one of its co-authors explaining dynamism and its impact on the economy.  ~  D

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A Change Leader Profile: 3 Ways to Define it

A Change Leader Profile:  3 Ways to Define it | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Look for five key competencies - drawn from..." a change-agent profile [based on]... extensive data on Fortune 1000 executives across a wide spectrum of industries. 


We’ve discovered... in that senior group:

    

  • They’re somewhat rare. Approximately 20 percent of senior executives scored high on five key competencies that correlate with effective change management.
   
  • Executives with those five competencies are more task-oriented than people-oriented.
    
  • They also appear to be motivated most by achievement. Power is a close second.
    

And here’s how we arrived at those high-level findings.


We analyzed competencies  ...we’ve identified the following strengths as key indicators of effective change management:

   

  1. Demonstrates flexibility and resilience. 
  2. Recognizes growth opportunities
  3. Strives for results. Focuses on improving performance.
  4. Leads courageously.  
  5. Gains buy-in.  



    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This post also connects DISC profile behaviors such as driving and impact, along with values such as achievement and power to those who lead the pack in effective change leader success.   ~  D

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    I'm the Boss! Why Should I Care If You Like Me? Research Results on Executive Likability

    I'm the Boss!  Why Should I Care If You Like Me?  Research Results on Executive Likability | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    Bad news for mean bosses.  In a study of 51,836 leaders, we found just 27 who were rated at the bottom quartile in terms of likability but in the top quartile in terms of overall leadership effectiveness — that's approximately one out of 2,000.

    360 data from these 50,000+ leaders highlighted seven key steps executives can take to substantially increase their likability.


    Excerpted:

       


    Increase positive emotional connections with others.... If a leader is angry or frustrated, those feelings will spread to others. Conversely, if a leader is positive and optimistic, those emotions also spread. Be aware of your emotional state and work to spread the positive emotions.

        

    Display rock solid integrity. Do others trust you to keep your commitments and promises? Are others confident that you will be fair and do the right thing? 

       
    Be a coach, mentor, and teacher. Most people have fond and positive memories of coaches and mentors. Helping others develop is a gift that is never forgotten.

    Be an inspiration. Most leaders know very well how to drive for results. ...The most successful leaders ...also ...roll up their sleeves ...and pitch in with the team. They communicate powerfully. Inspiring leaders...are more likeable.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Also scooped to Careers and Self-Awareness Strength.  ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 6, 2013 4:05 PM

    Like or dislike, integrity also connects to respect:  "Perhaps the surest test of an individual's integrity is his refusal to do or say anything that would damage his self-respect." ~ Thomas S. Monson

    Manish Puranik's curator insight, August 7, 2013 1:32 AM

    ...The most successful leaders ...also ...roll up their sleeves ...and pitch in with the team. They communicate powerfully. Inspiring leaders...are more likeable...

    Chad Manske's curator insight, August 19, 2013 8:00 AM

    It takes real humility to ask subordinates for feedback on your performance.  The purpose in doing so is not to expect to hear how good you are, but to hear what you need to work on.  We all have leadership 'blind spots' requiring the benefit of trusted people, ideally honest and critical subordinates, to tell us when we wear 'no clothes.'  If you're open and honest to feedback, and pay attention to the likability characteristics here, you WILL increase your leadership quotient.

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    High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video

    High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    "People are more instantaneously alive in healthy in High Quality Connections."


    Listen here (brief 4 min. video) as Professor Jane Dutton unlocks the importance of high quality connections and four ways how to make them.  


    It is NOT the same as developing positive relationships.


    Dr. Dutton is a co-founder of the Univ. of Michigan's Ross Business Schools growing domain of expertise called Positive Organizational Scholarship www.bus.umich.edu/Positive

    Her past research has explored processes of organizational adaptation, focusing on how strategic issues are interpreted and managed in organizations, as well as issues of organizational identity and change.


    Imagine the impact on a culture if this became a people investment value.


    Photo credit:  http://www.erb.umich.edu/

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Moving attention from negative deviance to positive deviance (as there is MUCH research on failure and what doesn't work) is what brings this resource to a change leadership watch listing instead of change management resources.

    From the first time that I've met Jane Dutton, I've been struck by her openness and deep focus on the scholarship of high quality connections and the impacts they have within organizations.  

    A chapter on the subject is here:  High Quality Connections

    Let me know what you think.  ~  Deb 

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    The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

    The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    "We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


    It's the how, the what, not so much!


    HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see buzz about updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


    Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


    "...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


    ____________________________


    HOW we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

    ____________________________


    MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


    What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


    Our data show that great teams:


    Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


    Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


    Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


    Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


    You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


    ...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


    Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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    Achieving a Sustainable, Virtuous Cycle of Strategic Change & Transformation in High Performance Businesses

    Achieving a Sustainable, Virtuous Cycle of Strategic Change & Transformation in High Performance Businesses | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
    Few companies decide to adopt new strategies without being forced to by financial trauma. What can we learn from those rare companies that achieve both successful major change and superior long-term financial performance?


    Excerpted research includes:


    Cadbury Schweppes, Tesco and Smith & Nephew all displayed the rare combination of making strategic transformations and, at the same time, achieving strong performance year after year for 20 years relative to industry peers around the world.


    FINDINGS

    • Successful transformers build alternative coalitions internally.
    • They create a tradition of constructively challenging the status quo.
    • They exploit “happy accidents” to make needed strategic changes.
    Sloan's goal was to draw insights from the small subset of high performers that successfully transformed themselves. Among other things, they wanted to understand the role of history — for example, which management processes and capabilities do companies need to develop over time.
    .
    Together, these advantages helped them establish the virtuous cycle of strategic transformation that their counterparts could not. (See “A Virtuous Cycle for Strategic Transformation.”)
    .
    Source:  Achieving Successful Strategic Transformation
    By Gerry Johnson, George S. Yip and Manuel Hensmans
    Photo Credit:  MIT Sloan Management Review, March 20, 2012
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    Leading the Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion

    Leading the Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

    How can change leaders support high performance, innovative teams? The infographic below cites 10 innovation strategies.  This is close.  There will be more of these process charts and innovation graphics.  


    This one features:


    Step 2:  Working at the organization's edges, the fringe & close to customers (I've heard Dr. Jeff DeGraff talk about fringe teams this year.)


    Step 3:  Culture that  supports experimentation, failure.  This is ubiquitous in mention, scarce in after-the-fact reporting.  Better known examples, 3M (Post-Its) and Google (Google Lab: Buzz, Wave, etc.)


    Step 6: Customer immersion, pain points


    Step 10:  Metrics, measures

     

    Sources include:  Christensen & Raynor, The Innovator's Solution: Creating & Sustaining Successful Growth, 2003  


    Note the continuous improvement language, adjusted slightly, a 'la W. Edwards Deming:  Ready, Aim, Fire, Adjust.  Like Plan, Do, Check, Act.


    Via Jonha Revesencio
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