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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Praise and Skepticism as Gravity Executive Sets Minimum Wage to $70,000 a Year

Praise and Skepticism as Gravity Executive Sets Minimum Wage to $70,000 a Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

While the overwhelming majority of the responses on social media and elsewhere were positive, there were also a number of people, [executives] who expressed doubts related to the nature of pay and compensation.

Excerpts:

 

Sandi Krakowski, an author and Facebook marketing expert, posted on Twitter: “His mind-set will hurt everyone in the end. He’s young. He has a good intent, but wrong method.”
    

Patrick R. Rogers, an associate professor of strategic management at the School of Business and Economics at North Carolina A&T State University, wrote in an email: “The sad thing is that Mr. Price probably thinks happy workers are productive workers. However, there’s just no evidence that this is true. So he’ll improve happiness, only in the short term, and will not improve productivity. Which doesn’t bode well for his long-term viability as a firm.”
     

Perhaps the most prominent attacker was Rush Limbaugh, the right-wing radio host, who labeled the move “pure, unadulterated socialism, which has never worked.”

    

Most critics were not as ideological as Mr. Limbaugh but were nevertheless put off by Mr. Price’s deviation from trusting in the market, both to set wages (his own as chief executive and that of his employees) and to maximize his own profits. Overpaying workers may make them lazy and is likely to inspire resentment among colleagues who once sat on the higher end of the pay divide, they warned.

During an interview with Mr. Price on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” the co-host Mika Brzezinski noted that people would probably say “you’re a terrible manager.”

Another guest, Sam Stein, an editor at The Huffington Post, was simply flummoxed. “Are you crazy?” he asked.

Maybe, Mr. Price conceded.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally I mentioned that this case would be a good test of Herzberg's theories about pay, satisfaction and productivity.  I posted later that I stood corrected, when I heard he was taking a pay cut of 90% to help fund the salary increases.  
      

On the one hand, he is a change leader because of the message he is sending about executive pay, and because of his boldness to be "crazy" and to experiment in this way.  On the other hand, it will be a good test of the limits of pay, and the theories and research that show that happiness and productivity are not necessary in the same room together.  Or perhaps they can be.  Check out a sample of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's slides I captured at his University of Michigan presentation this month.


Jonsson, CEO & co-founder of Jumpstarter describes Flow as

a state of mind where you are immensely focused and get things done. It is those precious moments when you are productive and ecstatic at the same time.  It is achieved by clearing the mind from the mind clutter. Mind clutter could be thoughts, feelings and impressions. Clearing it is achieved by actively working with accepting emotions, addressing problems when they arise and seeing things as they are.


”Flow-stoppers” are all those things that create mind clutter. It could be anything from deadlines to personal relationships to putting pressure on oneself to perform and do well.


Time will tell. He continues as a potential change leader, nonetheless for shaking things up.  ~  Deb

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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


It's the how, the what, not so much!


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see buzz about updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


HOW we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting Facts in 2014

5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting Facts in 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Scientists are not only far from a comprehensive explanation of how the brain works, they can't even agree on the best way to study it. So it's not surprising that myths and misinformation continue to persist —spurred on, in part, by pop culture. But why do we continue to buy into these falsehoods?.

Myth: You are either right- or left-brained dominant.

    

"In reality, we are all whole-brain users." said Shelton. "But this myth helps people define their differences, similar to calling someone male or female. So if you define yourself as right-brained, it immediately connects you with a set of predetermined qualities."

     

Other debunked myths in this useful piece:

   

Myth: You only use 10 percent of your brain.

Myth: Alcohol kills brain cells.

Myth: Brain damage is permanent.

Myth: Your IQ is a fixed number.

      

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

              

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

                 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Brain sapping beliefs persist and drain productivity and performance in business and in overall learning.  Check the job descriptions in your business for words like "must be able to multi-task."  

Check manufacturing employee schedules for overloaded work-days such 12 hour days 7 days a week.  It's happening in businesses making record profits and NOT hiring temp staff to even out the work load.

At least this good article brings us up to date on brain science.  There is a long way to go.   ~  Deb 

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Manish Puranik's curator insight, August 4, 2014 1:31 AM
"In reality, we are all whole-brain users..."