Change Leadership...
Follow
Find tag "learning"
11.9K views | +4 today
Change Leadership Watch
How change happens and who is leading it.  For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting Facts in 2014

5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting Facts in 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Scientists are not only far from a comprehensive explanation of how the brain works, they can't even agree on the best way to study it. So it's not surprising that myths and misinformation continue to persist —spurred on, in part, by pop culture. But why do we continue to buy into these falsehoods?.

Myth: You are either right- or left-brained dominant.

    

"In reality, we are all whole-brain users." said Shelton. "But this myth helps people define their differences, similar to calling someone male or female. So if you define yourself as right-brained, it immediately connects you with a set of predetermined qualities."

     

Other debunked myths in this useful piece:

   

Myth: You only use 10 percent of your brain.

Myth: Alcohol kills brain cells.

Myth: Brain damage is permanent.

Myth: Your IQ is a fixed number.

      

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

              

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

                 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Brain sapping beliefs persist and drain productivity and performance in business and in overall learning.  Check the job descriptions in your business for words like "must be able to multi-task."  

Check manufacturing employee schedules for overloaded work-days such 12 hour days 7 days a week.  It's happening in businesses making record profits and NOT hiring temp staff to even out the work load.

At least this good article brings us up to date on brain science.  There is a long way to go.   ~  Deb 

more...
Manish Puranik's curator insight, August 3, 10:31 PM
"In reality, we are all whole-brain users..."
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes

8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches:  The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"To date, there have been 44 United States presidents - on  January 21st Barack Obama delivered the 57th Inaurgural Address."



Here are excerpts from eight (8) lessons the author, Margaret M. Perlis, learned from the best and worst of the inaugural addresses including:


Excerpts:


Keep It Real:  James Buchanan, our 15th president, was one of the worst in American history, when the issues of slavery and secession were reaching a boiling point. While Buchanan rejected slavery...he refused to challenge the constitutional establishment...and states that were threatening secession.


...His inauguration speech ...diminish(es) the severity of impending conflicts by peppering it with words like “simple” or “happy.”


Know Your Audience, Understand Your Outcome:


Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address was delivered to a war-torn and weary nation.  ...Lincoln’s brief 600-word address, ....one of the most powerful in U.S. history ...spurned triumphalism, instead choosing a tone of magnanimity: “both sides read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invoked His aid against the other.” 


Read the full text here.


For examples of the power of story, see these two examples:

A personal and a human story of overcoming adversity via a classic from Deb's blog:

Several story & case study examples of how to build agility in a volatile business climate:
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Via the highest office of the land, USA, change & progress is portrayed in ways that work and ways that do not, showing that storytelling and speeches are important to the leadership art of inspiration and influence.  ~  Deb


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Target Managing Change, Unique & Standard, Starting With the CIO

Target Managing Change, Unique & Standard, Starting With the CIO | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Target Corp. is among the top three or four U.S. retailers, ...a coveted position in such a volatile industry.  IT is a critical player in each move, if not a keystone."


The CIO of Target provides insight into how the giant retailer accomplished major change in the last 2-3 years.  For readers from larger companies with IT responsible for helping support major change, how does their story resonate with what you've experienced with IT as an accelerator or lever?

_________________________

  

We're making changes where [project] life cycle is a matter of days or weeks...

_________________________


Excerpts:

Target brought over Beth Jacob from an operations post, an unconventional move. Jacob was vice president of guest operations when she was tapped to lead IT as executive vice president and CIO with a budget of over $1 billion.


She oversaw Target.com's switch from Amazon.com's e-commerce platform to one that was home-grown.


At the other end of the big-project spectrum, Jacob has introduced projects that capitalize on mobile computing, such as smartphone coupons.


CIO Insight: The nature or change has changed, hasn't it? It seems that change isn't always iterative... You can't attack fires the same way because the fire's never the same.


Jacob: You're spot on. …change management is …going to be more important than ever. ...Change is something we lean into.


Because of that, the TTS team has had to change almost everything, including the way it partners [internally and externally]. And the way it approaches different organizational change initiatives.


...In the last year or so, the pace of change has significantly increased. We're making changes where the [project] life cycle is a matter of days or weeks - think about the mobile capabilities we've implemented.


CIO Insight: ...days and weeks. Can you expand on that?


Jacob: We have to be ready to bring a company offering to our guests and staff, both of whom are more tech savvy. One example would...mobile [device] coupons. Last holiday, we created a mobile-coupon program tied to our toy catalog in just a few days. ...The coupons are very easy for guests to use, very easy for our team members to work with.


[Ed. note: Target claims to be the first national retailer to offer a scanable mobile-coupon program, in 2010. Shoppers who opt in get a text-message link to a mobile Web page that can contain multiple with offers, all accessible through a single bar code. Coupons are then redeemed by a cashier scanning the bar code on the shopper's phone at checkout.]


CIO Insight: You took a big gamble ...when Target decided to abandon Amazon.com's e-commerce platform for one you built yourselves. 


Jacob: It took us just over two years to get off the Amazon platform and onto our own. Overall, it went well.


Photo source:  Wikipedia.org (en)


Click on the title or photo to read the full article.


From Deb,  Change Management is an engagement focus. Exert too much control, and you stifle it. Here's more about control issues within a project implementation:


   
    
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

The Stupid Company? Is Collective Intelligence a Myth? Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival

The Stupid Company?  Is Collective Intelligence a Myth?  Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

In theory, everyone is for the learning organization or the mobilization of collective intelligence.   How could you be against it? Would that make you in favour of the "stupid organization"?


eCollab Blog Carnival post suggested by Frederic Domon. It looks like a great idea. ~ Deb


Few organizations have developed a model for a sustainable learning organization.


So, is collective intelligence a myth? What are the reasons for successive failures at attempts to implement the learning organization? How can this be fixed?

Please join us in this discussion!

If you wish to participate (2 choices):

Do you have a blog?


  • Respond with an article you publish on your blog. Send an email to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com or a tweet to @hjarche or @fdomon to make sure we do not forget your article.
 
 
  • If you use Twitter, send a message linked to your post using the hashtag #ecollab
  
  • We will publish all articles, or excerpts of them on the site. This will make for easier reading of the blog carnival. We will link to the original article and will contact you for a short bio and photo to include with the article
  


You do not have a blog but this interests you?

   

Send your article directly to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com. We will then publish it.
   

Good blog Carnival and thank you in advance for your participation. - Frederic Domon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Youth and Optimism: Emotional Intelligence foundation skills for the Future of Change Resiliency

Youth and Optimism: Emotional Intelligence foundation skills for the Future of Change Resiliency | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Introducing students as young as 13 to the principles of EI can have an significant impact on behaviour and academic performance.  The benefits only increase as the students mature towards school leaving age."


This HR article captures the systemic nature of our education system and the need for long term thinking, especially with the decline of creativity in the U.S.


Excerpts:


Dr Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania found that scores on a test of optimism in 500 UPENN freshmen were a better predictor of actual grades during their first year than SAT scores or high school grades.


...There is no doubt that by measuring and developing key emotional elements such as self-awareness, empathy, adaptability, relationship skills and optimism (none of which you will find on the curriculum of most schools today!) [improves] our predictions around which students will succeed and which may need more support.


...we can actually improve academic results and, even more importantly, prepare our young people better for higher education or the workplace.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Learning Happens Everywhere!
Scoop.it!

30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028

30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028


Take a look at   2018


Technology to promote early literacy habits is seeded by venture capitalists. This is the start of new government programs that start farming out literacy and educational programs to start-ups, entrepreneurs, app developers, and other private sector innovators.


Digital literacy begins to outpace academic literacy in some fringe classrooms.


...Open Source learning models will grow faster than those closed, serving as a hotbed for innovation in learning.


Via miracletrain 夢想驛站
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Trend watching also goes with change leadership.  ~  D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, May 7, 2013 2:08 AM
Great idea Audrey!
Audrey's comment, May 7, 2013 3:39 PM
Thank you.
Dwayne L Thompson's curator insight, May 11, 2013 1:02 PM

An educated consumer is our best customer! 

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Collaborate to Thrive: Dr. Dre & Luke Wood, Crowdsourced Lessons in FastCompany 2013

Collaborate to Thrive:  Dr. Dre & Luke Wood, Crowdsourced Lessons in FastCompany 2013 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Fast Company is crowdsourcing learning lessons to jump into 2013.  Dr. Dre and Luke Wood speak up about casting the right community of people quickly - [their] biggest challenge and opportunity."


Their question to leaders?   What did you learn in 2012 that you will carry forth with you into 2013?"


From ONE of their leader, crowd-sourced contributions:  

Excerpts: 


1) "You have to build the village first.  From my first 20 years ...in the music business...you could rely on a diverse portfolio of artists to create the phrenetic and improvisational energy that challenged convention and compelled the company forward.

In the consumer electronics, you have to generate that energy from the people who work at the company every day.


It requires daily focus and attention.  [We] grew from 30 to 170 this year, casting the right community of people quickly became our biggest challenge and opportunity."


2) As Beats continues to grow, we are going to search high and low to find talent that is individually smart and ambitious but collectively awe inspiring. 


Dr. Dre, President And COO, Luke Wood on "It Takes A Village."  More here.


Photo by Aqeel Hassim CC Flickr.


From curator Deb, relevant topics:  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Collaborate or die is true now, more than ever.  Technology smooths the way (YouTube world collaboration music anyone?)  

There's so much more, building on the best of individual strengths to create the extraordinary and to learn through our insides to our outsides  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO]

Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO] | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Intuit founder Scott Cook and what went wrong the first time they rolled out the company's Quicken tax prep software worldwide.


It would see cultural due diligence was the lesson learned here.  

______________________________

   

We can launch,  ....but then the sales slowed way down.  

______________________________ 

   

Yes, it seems it was a ethnocentric blind spot.  Paraphrased:  ONLY in the US did we studying the customer & give them exactly what they wanted.  We didn't do that overseas.  

    

Excerpted:

   

We'd get meetings of our global teams together…  We could launch, could get the press, we could fill the channel, we'd get initial evidence.

   

But then the sales slowed way down.   

   

Visiting the Japanese:  150 people crammed into the biggest room we had.   Strategy, plan, dream.  He asked for questions.  In Japan, they don't ask questions of the big guy.  Silence.

   

One engineer, finally, cautiously raised his hand:  Why does our product for Japan look just like an American product?  It was built for Americans, not Japanese.   …And he was right.  Ultimately the root cause problem was too hard to overcome.

   

The root cause was baked into our early decision.   …We build them based on what we knew in the U.S.

   

See the full video here.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
Scoop.it!

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

______________________


...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

______________________



...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

______________________

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

______________________



In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


Via juandoming, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.