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4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership

4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

From the 3rd Results Oriented principle, Leader behaviors – McKinsey research helps us know what works best today. From the article: 

5 Strategies to Lead Change, Using Liberating Structures



Five key concepts and supporting research and tools will help you lead through adaptive change in a VUCA world, one that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous, as presented in Mexico City for CPA firm leaders at the Russell Bedford International conference, yet applicable for any leader.

 

 



Researchers showed that out of 20 distinct leadership traits identified in organizations whose leadership performance was strong, high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior.  These 4 behaviors explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness

1. Solving problems effectively.

2. Operating with a strong results orientation.

3. Seeking different perspectives.

4. Supporting others.

This is from the McKinsey Quarterly, first published in 1964, which now offers the perspective today that “much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant,” (Dobbs, 2014.) McKinsey forecasts a crash of:

1) technological disruption,

2) rapid emerging-markets growth, and

3) widespread aging as “long-held assumptions [give] way, and seemingly powerful business models [become] upended.”

Sound familiar? Are you ready? 

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Leadership Fail: Washington Metro System Failed to Learn From Accidents, Report Finds

Leadership Fail: Washington Metro System Failed to Learn From Accidents, Report Finds | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
The National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the subway system had made “little or no progress” toward instituting a culture of safety.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

More on the mismanagement and the cautionary tale of failed leadership of the failing D.C. Metro, once a shining example of mass transit in Washington DC.

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Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It takes courage to listen. Whether it’s a first or fifth transition to a new leader role, these non-profit leadership lessons learned are timeless. Pause, reflect. choose, (from horse-guided leadership & learning.) In the first months, resist the urgent and not important to follow these practical steps to ensure your success.  

______________________
It takes courage to listen & learn, as a new leader.
_______________________

 

What I learned at the University of Michigan early on was the power of the conversation. Listening builds relationship. Listening well has impact as a leader with groups of new direct reports, with peers and colleagues, ALL of them await a new leader’s first steps and actions. Each. Encounter. Equals. Opportunity. To. Connect.

John Taylor, CEO of the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) had this to say about the series:
 

“As a new CEO, the article’s main points to invest time in learning, building relationships, and establishing priorities have been key during my first six months on the job.”  
 

I interviewed John before he left his role at the University of Michigan. His view is a fresh insight to help this year's new leaders.  Note that although we make reference to associations throughout the posts, these tips apply to any non-profit organization and are adaptable to the for-profit sector as well.

EXCERPTS from the full article derived from
  -- "Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job"

1. LISTEN to Learn

In many high-pressure environments, deep listening distinguishes the highly experienced from the amateurs. ...One association executive advised his peers to “resist the temptation to prove how bright you are; do nothing when you first arrive—just learn.”
   

...Develop a list for listening interviews including staff, board members, active volunteers, randomly selected members, dropped members, industry leaders, subject matter experts, external partners, and others. Everyone has something to say; they ...will be encouraged by your desire to learn. Ask open-ended questions. Prepare to be surprised. Though many relationships will deepen during your tenure, early conversations can provide unique opportunities for candid exchanges unencumbered by baggage, fears, or agendas.

 

2. COMMUNICATE!

...Information for your staff is usually under-communicated by a factor of four.
 

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Staff members are vitally interested in what the boss [senior leadership team, executive committee, board] just talked about. Find a way to share it regularly.

    

  • The board should be vitally interested in progress toward strategic goals. Find a way to check on this.
   
  • Committees and other volunteer groups don’t know what other committees and groups are doing. Summarize, align, and share.
   
  • Members and constituents want to know “What’s in it for me?”  They will appreciate understanding the logic behind board decisions. Find a way to test, confirm and communicate this regularly. 
Read the full post on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/courage-new-leaders-listen-learn-year-deb-nystrom 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article is useful for any non-profit leader in interim roles, as well as new leadership roles.  It's drawn from my work with new, on-boarding leaders in a large, complex, world-class non-profit, the University of Michigan, and my continuing work for my own company,REVELN Consulting, co-written with my colleagues, senior partners at Ideas for Action, LLCAlan Davis, my former client and friend, Jolene Knapp, who are both talented, highly experienced non-profit CEO's and leaders. I'm pleased to be sharing with you ourSeven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job".

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Michigan Leadership: Dug Song, CEO & Duo Security assisting former ForeSee employees after layoffs

Michigan Leadership: Dug Song, CEO & Duo Security assisting former ForeSee employees after layoffs | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
In the wake of the second round of layoffs at Ann Arbor-based ForeSee, another local tech company is trying to help connect those now without jobs with companies looking for talent.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These are Dug Song, ‪#‎leadership‬ lessons for ‪#‎Michigan‬ and any business in the area of layoffs.  Reaching out and helping the system of up and down business employment cycles, especially, as in the case of Duo Security, when your business is hiring when another is laying off, is simply good business smarts.  The way Duo Security is doing it is 21st century smart.  #HR #21stcentury #growth

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4 Leader Behaviors that drive 89% of Effectiveness. Why Org Health Matters | McKinsey

4 Leader Behaviors that drive 89% of Effectiveness. Why Org Health Matters | McKinsey | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

ip McKinsey's recent research points to a small subset of leadership skills that closely correlates with leadership success, particularly among frontline leaders. McKinsey came up with a comprehensive list of 20 distinct leadership traits, surveyed 189,000 people in 81 diverse organizations around the world to assess how frequently certain kinds of leadership behavior are applied within their organizations. Finally, they divided the sample into organizations whose leadership performance was strong (the top quartile of leadership effectiveness as measured by McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index) and those that were weak (bottom quartile).
    

What McKinsey found was that leaders in organizations with high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior; these 4, indeed, explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness (exhibit).

     

Four kinds of behavior account for 89 percent of leadership effectiveness.

    

  • Solving problems effectively. The process that precedes decision making is problem solving, when information is gathered, analyzed, and considered. This is deceptively difficult to get right, yet it is a key input into decision making for major issues (such as M&A) as well as daily ones (such as how to handle a team dispute).
         
  • Operating with a strong results orientation. Leadership is about not only developing and communicating a vision and setting objectives but also following through to achieve results. Leaders with a strong results orientation tend to emphasize the importance of efficiency and productivity and to prioritize the highest-value work.
          
  • Seeking different perspectives. ...monitors trends affecting organizations, grasps changes in the environment, encourages employees to contribute ideas that could improve performance, accurately differentiate between important and unimportant issues, and gives the appropriate weight to stakeholder concerns. Leaders who do well on this dimension typically base their decisions on sound analysis and avoid the many biases to which decisions are prone.
         
  • Supporting others. Leaders who are supportive understand and sense how other people feel. By showing authenticity and a sincere interest in those around them, they build trust and inspire and help colleagues to overcome challenges. They intervene in group work to promote organizational efficiency, allaying unwarranted fears about external threats and preventing the energy of employees from dissipating into internal conflict.

   

From McKinsey’s Organizational Health Index research:  The ...presence, at all ...levels, of talented, high-potential leaders ...is essential to create something from nothing.

While most organizations use career opportunities to motivate employees, companies in this cluster use career opportunities as a leadership-development practice. Role modeling and real experience are more important than passing along sage lessons.
   

Related leadership posts:

   
    

                                                   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

McKinsey offers insights on where to pivot the time you put into leadership development including the 4 behaviors as well as 4 recipes associated with sustained success.  Want to create change and "something from nothing?"  
    
Then read McKinsey's take (from the Index research) on the four "distinct underlying approach to managing, including core beliefs about value creation and what drives organizational success."  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 1, 2016 6:44 PM

Four leadership behaviors that drive 89 percent of the difference between strong and weak organizations is worth a CLOSE look.  ~  Deb

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Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
He made the stunning announcement on Tuesday during a press conference.


Blatter has been under fire since last week, when indictments for 14 people, including members of the FIFA executive committee, were handed out by the U.S. Department of Justice for charges of racketeering, money laundering, and bribery.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Including the previous post on the need to step back and pivot FIFA into a new era, this provides fresh opportunity to fix what's been broken for a long time.  The challenge is great, the rewards could also be great if successful change happens at all levels. ~  Deb

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CEO cuts his own pay by 90% to give every employee a huge pay rise

CEO cuts his own pay by 90% to give every employee a huge pay rise | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
A chief executive has announced plans to raise the salary of every single employee at his company to at least $70,000 (£47,000) – and will fund it by cutting his own salary by 90 per cent.

     

Mr Price, 30, has gone one step further, after telling ABC News he thought CEO pay was “way out of whack”.
    

In order not to bankrupt the business, those on less than $70,000 now will receive a $5,000-per-year pay increase or an immediate minimum of $50,000, whichever is greater.
    

A spokesperson for the company said the average salary was currently $48,000, and the measure will see pay increase for about 70 members of staff.

    

...

“My pay is based on market rates and what it would take to replace me, and because of this growing inequality as a CEO that amount is really high. I make a crazy amount.
     

The New York Times, which was invited along for the Wolf of Wall Street-esque announcement, reported that after the cheering died down Mr Price shouted: “Is anyone else freaking out right now?”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Now here's a guy who's sending out a big message about executive compensation, along with wage fairness.  This is beyond the thoughts I had shared about wage / pay and motivation, a 'la Frederik Herzberg.   ~  Deb

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Germany's Green Energy Is an Expensive Success

Germany's Green Energy Is an Expensive Success | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Germany's policy of switching to clean energy looks like a failure on the surface, but it has succeeded in changing people's thinking for the future.

...the policy's results show how a determined government can eventually shake up complacent oligopolies and point their thinking in a different direction.

   

The German government's subsidies to wind, solar and other renewable energy producers have grown to 20 billion euros per year (almost $26 billion at the current exchange rate) since 1991, when Germany first started the financial support. With that massive amount of aid, Germany overshot by three percentage points the European Union's 1997 goal of producing 12 percent of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. In the first quarter of 2014, Germany's electricity mix had a 27 percent renewable share.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cheap, polluted. Clean, expensive. It's not that simple, yet in some ways, it is.  ~  Deb

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Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders

Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

#1, Pope Francis has electrified the church and attracted legions of non-Catholic admirers by energetically setting a new direction. He has refused to occupy the palatial papal apartments, has washed the feet of a female Muslim prisoner, is driven around Rome in a Ford Focus, and famously asked "Who am I to judge?" with regard to the church's view of gay members.
     
He created a group of eight cardinals to advise him on reform, which a church historian calls the "most important step in the history of the church for the past 10 centuries."  ... S
gns of a "Francis effect" abound: In a poll in March, one in four Catholics said they'd increased their charitable giving to the poor this year. Of those, 77% said it was due in part to the Pope.

   

Others on the list, excerpted:

    
#2 Angela Merkel, 59, Chancellor, Germany, may be the most successful national leader in the world today. She is the leader of the European Union, which as a whole is the world's largest economy, and Merkel has held that position for almost nine years. She played the lead role in managing Europe's debt crisis, keeping the EU intact while setting even Greece on the road to recovery.

       

#3 Alan Mulally, 68, CEO, Ford Motor Co.  Ford's miracle worker saved the company without resorting to bankruptcy or bailouts by doing what previous leaders had tried and failed to do: change Ford's risk-averse, reality-denying, CYA-based culture. After earning $7.2 billion of profit last year -- far more than General Motors  GM -0.25%  or Chrysler -- the company paid its 47,000 UAW workers a record $8,800 each in profit sharing.

     

#4 Warren Buffett, 83, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway, leads 300,000 employees with a values-based, hands-off style that gives managers wide leeway and incentivizes them like owners. The result is America's fifth-most-valuable company.
   

Also on the list of 50:

Bill Clinton, 68, Founder, The Clinton Foundation
Aung San Suu Kyi, 68, Chair, National League for Democracy
Gen. Joe Dunford, 58, Commander, U.S. Forces, Afghanistan
Bono, 53,Lead singer, U2
Dalai Lama, 78, Spiritual leader of the Tibetan people
Jeff Bezos, 50, CEO, Amazon.com

 

         

Related change posts by Deb:

              

                              

                 

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The full list of 50 is worth a review even though it came out this past March.  Most of these change leaders will stand the test of time. As of November 2014, the #1 spot of Argentine Pope Frances, who exemplifies change leadership, with influence far beyond several billions of Catholics worldwide.  Ex-Catholics, if it were a denomination, would be the third largest group, and yet his message carries further to so many more of the world's citizens.
     
My half Argentine heritage speaks  to one thing I know of many Argentines, including Pope Frances ~ they are challengers.

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KSU prez gives up $90K of his own salary to give lowest-paid employees a raise

KSU prez gives up $90K of his own salary to give lowest-paid employees a raise | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
"This is not a publicity stunt," he said. "You don't give up $90,000 for publicity. I did this for the people. This is something I've been thinking about from the very beginning."


The raise in pay for those employees will stay in place even after a new president is selected, he said. It will be the rate for all new hires as well. The change is immediate.


His salary, originally $349,869, is now $259,745.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The lead line for the article is, "Now this is leadership."  Perhaps the difference in his before and after salary, and his prior role with GE have inspired him to make an example that may inspire others.


When is a certain level of salary, house, home and possessions enough - so that those with wealth share it with those who struggle to make ends meet?


It reminds me of the video circulating about the homeless sharing their food and money that has been given to them recently, while the average American does not share when asked by someone for food or money.  ~  D

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Classic: What is success? Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum

Classic:  What is success?  Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Philosopher Peter Koestenbaum poses the truly big questions: How do we act when risks seem overwhelming? What does it mean to be a successful human being?

___________________

   

How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

___________________

       

{Have you asked yourself:]  How in the world did I get here? Or wrestled with ...strategic choices -- all of which seem hard and unpleasant -- and said, What happened to the fun part of being in business? According to Peter Koestenbaum, those uncomfortable questions -- those existential quandaries -- are at the root of issues that great leaders deal with all the time, and they influence every decision that must be made.
  
More than 25 years ago, Koestenbaum traded the cloistered halls of academia for the front lines of the global economy. It's not unheard-of for this philosopher, a tireless 71-year-old with thick glasses and a flowing beard, to visit clients across three continents in a single week. His agenda: to apply the power of philosophy to the big question of the day -- how to reconcile the often-brutal realities of business with basic human values -- and to create a new language of effective leadership. ...The more you understand the human condition, the more effective you are as a businessperson. Human depth makes business sense."

     

___________________

   


Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. 

___________________

   

Koestenbaum's wisdom makes sense to leaders at such giant organizations as Ford, EDS, Citibank, Xerox, Ericsson, and even one of Korea's chaebols. ... At Ford, Koestenbaum contributed to the company's 2,000-person Senior Executive Program throughout the 1980s. In more than a decade at EDS, he led seminars and coached hundreds of top executives, including then-chairman Les Alberthal. 


"Everything I do," says Koestenbaum, "is about using themes from the history of thought to rescue people who are stuck." His logic: Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. But too many people and too many companies approach change by treating it as a technical challenge rather than by developing authentic answers to basic questions about business life. 


WHY DOES BEING A LEADER FEEL SO HARD TODAY?

Because reckoning with freedom is always hard ...We're living in a peculiar time: It's marked by a soaring stock market, the creation of tremendous wealth, an explosion in innovation, and the acute alienation that occurs when the global economy hits the average individual. 

The message is, You're living in the best country in the world at the best time in history; you have an amazing degree of freedom to do what you want, along with an unprecedented opportunity to build immense wealth and success -- and to do it more quickly than ever before. Of course, the average individual has as much of a chance of launching a skyrocketing IPO as he or she has of becoming a movie star. 

       
________________________________
     
There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. ...There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change.

________________________________

       

What's even more disturbing is that the ascendancy of shareholder value as the dominant driving force in business has resulted in a terrible insensitivity to basic human values. 

THAT'S A HEAVY BURDEN TO PLACE ON LEADERS. THEY MUST NOT ONLY GUIDE ORGANIZATIONS BUT ALSO WRESTLE WITH BASIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS.


There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change. The average person is...riveted by the objective domain...where our metrics are; that's where we look for solutions. ...That's why books and magazines that have numbers in their titles sell so well.


We'll do anything to avoid facing the basic, underlying questions: How do we make truly difficult choices? How do we act when the risks seem overwhelming? How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

     

___________________

   

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. 
___________________


There's nothing wrong with all of those technical solutions. They're excellent; they're creative; they're even necessary. But they shield us from the real issues: What kind of life do I want to lead? What is my destiny? How much evil am I willing to tolerate?

      

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. When you grapple with polarities in your life, you lose your arrogant, self-indulgent illusions, and you realize that the joke is on you. To get that message makes you a more credible human being -- instantly. 

===
As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

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  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

          

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've recently learned that this classic article is the most downloaded article from Fast Company.  If you read it, you'll see why.  It asks the beautiful, and extraordinarily difficult questions about business and life. Changing perspective, and ultimately changing attitudes, is the big challenge in making lasting change fully sustainable.~  D

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Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice: New Research on Why

Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice:  New Research on Why | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Carly Fiorina, forced out. A MERE 5% of the chief executives of the world’s biggest companies are women. And they are more likely to be sacked than their more numerous male colleagues: 38% of the female CEOs who left their jobs over the past ten years were forced to go, compared with 27% of the men. 
     
In the Strategy& study, the clumsy new name for Booz & Company, 35% of female CEOs are hired from outside the company, compared with just 22% of male ones.

  • Outsiders generally have a higher chance of being kicked out, 
  • Generate lower returns to shareholders
  • Outsiders are less likely to have a support network of friends who can rally around when times get tough. 
         

Carly Fiorina, dropped as HP’s boss in 2005, made things worse by inviting such publicity. But the same is not true of, say, Ginni Rometty, the lower-profile boss of IBM (promoted from within the company in 2012), who is under fire over the firm’s performance.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


                   

              


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The change leader implication, as described in the article, is the call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping diminish raiding due to scarce supply, which tends to be counterproductive for women's careers anyway, and 3) increasing success by having more women available to promote from within.  ~ Deb


Also posted to Careers and Self-Aware Strength.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 9:11 AM

This is a useful gender perspective on leadership development and, as the article concludes, a call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping to prevent raiding because of scarce supply, (and it's counterproductive anyway, the research suggests) and 3) increasing success by having more women to promote from within.  ~  Deb

Tamkin Amin's curator insight, May 15, 2014 5:03 PM

hmmm... I find this interesting.

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Avoiding Decision Failures: The NASA Challenger Explosion and Groupthink

When alternatives are overlooked because cohesion is favored over individuality, the results can be tragic and lasting.

The top decision-making team responsible for the Challenger launch was very familiar with each other. They had worked with each for many years prior to the mission.


Group cohesiveness in decision-making can be deceiving. Decisions are often made quickly and with high levels of consensus, but this doesn’t always correlate to the BEST choices. When alternatives are overlooked, because cohesion is favored over individuality, poor decisions can arise.


How can you avoid this?
Remember a quick decision doesn’t always mean a great decision. Carefully examine alternatives by bringing together diverse groups of people with varied backgrounds. It is important that the solution is the priority rather than pleasing, or being an appeasing group member. 

Precursors of Groupthink
1. Cohesive Group
2. Insulation from Experts
3. Leader Preferences


This post also highlights 8 symptoms of groupthink including:

  • Inherent Morality
  • Stereotyped Views of Others
  • Self Censorship
  • Mindguarding 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Following my last post, this is a  large part of a the risky, and at times the lonely business of challenging "strong leader preferences" that led to a tragic, well known outcome in the USA. ~ D

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Angie Tarasoff's curator insight, March 27, 2014 12:52 PM

This is a tremendous article that discusses decision traps when making decisions in groups.


The precursors and symptoms of groupthink  are polarities - how might you manage the situation when you notice these behaviours occuring?

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Holacracy: not safe enough to try — Medium

Holacracy: not safe enough to try — Medium | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Holacracy exclusively focuses on internal processes and keeps the organization busy with organizing itself.

We completely got caught up with implementing and learning how to function in and operating with Holacracy. The system is ridiculously complicated without reason, and very challenging to learn.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A story about why holacracy did not work and may not be worth trying in your organization.

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Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance

Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Like a well-played symphony, when nonprofit leaders partner well with their staff and volunteers, magic happens.  Leadership & Partnership in the nonprofit sector:"

_________________________


Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. 

_________________________
 

In this Part Two post from  “Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed The First Year on the Job," – co-authored with Jolene Knapp and Alan Davis, another Ideas for Action, LLC colleague, we offer solutions for nurturing a successful partnership.  Part One of the series recommended first steps of CEO listening and communicating with the specific titles of:


  1. Listen to learn
  2. Communicate, and communicate again

Below, we share details and links to resources on setting the leadership agenda as well as finding your rhythm with a new board chair or council president, as well as educating and encouraging volunteers.
 

_________________________

Co-creation is a powerful way to establish partnership.
_________________________

3. Set a Leadership Agenda

When things go wrong between CEOs and their boards, it’s often the result of a failure to reach a common understanding of what constitutes success. Co-create the new leadership agenda. One of the best tools we’ve seen is a simple but powerful template for articulating priorities and goals for the next 18 months, including the respective roles of the new leader, board, and senior staff in achieving them.   (See the Sample Leadership Agenda in this article from the Bridgespan Group.)


Do not overcommit yourself or your staff. Leaders, members, and other stakeholders are excited about a new CEO; they want projects or tasks implemented that may have been pending for a while or they have new ideas.


Establish a pattern of having strategic conversations with the board that set clear expectations about goals, roles, and ways to assess progress. In addition, it is important to assure that the chair/president is passing along information to the rest of the board.
 

4.  Establish a Rhythm for Building Shared Leadership with the Board Chair

In the complex world of governance, it’s important to find a communication pattern that builds solid leadership connection in your organization. One CEO we consulted said that in preparation for each new governance year, she facilitated an off-site leadership transition retreat with the incoming president, immediate past president, and new president-elect. (This will vary with the size and culture of your board.) In a private and relaxed setting, the goal was to orient the president-elect to current challenges, provide deep background on strategic priorities, and co-create a shared leadership vision for the year.


Related posts by Deb on Non-Profit Leadership in this series:

    

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Manish Puranik's curator insight, January 11, 2016 11:55 PM

'Listen to Learn' and 'Communicate, and communicate again' would prove the simplest mantra of this age, if used appropriately! 

Jaro Berce's curator insight, March 2, 2016 6:07 AM

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last

Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research confirms what they say about nice guys...[or at least the result is a lot more nuanced that it seems.


________________________

   

Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers.

________________________


Excerpted:

We have some well-worn aphorisms…courtesy of Machiavelli (“It is far better to be feared than loved”), Dale Carnegie (“Begin with praise and honest appreciation”), and Leo Durocher (who may or may not have actually said “Nice guys finish last”). More recently, books like The Power of Nice and The Upside of Your Dark Side have continued in the same vein: long on certainty, short on proof.

     

So it was a breath of fresh air when, in 2013, there appeared a book that brought data into the debate. The author, Adam Grant, is a 33-year-old Wharton professor, and his best-selling book, Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success, offers evidence that “givers”—people who share their time, contacts, or know-how without expectation of payback—dominate the top of their fields. “This pattern holds up across the board,” Grant wrote—from engineers in California to salespeople in North Carolina to medical students in Belgium. …[T]he book appears to have swung the tide of business opinion toward the happier, nice-guys-finish-first scenario.

   

And yet suspicions …remain—fueled, in part, by …Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson.  …Since Steve Jobs was published in 2011, “I think I’ve had 10 conversations where CEOs have looked at me and said, ‘Don’t you think I should be more of an asshole?’” says Robert Sutton, a professor of management at Stanford, whose book, The No Asshole Rule, nonetheless includes a chapter titled “The Virtues of Assholes.”

    

In Grant’s framework, the mentor in this story would be classified as a “taker,” which brings us to a major complexity in his findings. Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers. It’s a nuance that’s often lost in the book’s popular rendering.

   

…[M]anagement professor Donald Hambrick, of Penn State [knows] academic psychology’s definition of narcissism—a trait Hambrick measured in CEOs and then plotted against the performance of their companies, in a 2007 study with Arijit Chatterjee.

…Hambrick…chose a set of indirect measures: the prominence of each CEO’s picture in the company’s annual report; the size of the CEO’s paycheck compared with that of the next-highest-paid person in the company; the frequency with which the CEO’s name appeared in company press releases. Lastly, he looked at the CEO’s use of pronouns in press interviews, comparing the frequency of the first-person plural with that of the first-person singular. Then he rolled all the results into a single narcissism indicator.
 

How did the narcissists fare? Hambrick …ound that the narcissists were like Grant’s givers: they clustered near both extremes of the success spectrum.

Related posts by Deb:
      

              

        

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The humility and selflessness of Collin's Level 5 leadership, as well as Professor Adam Grant's important work on Givers, Takers and Matchers shows a nuance about timing and intensity.  It seems giving can include a goodly portion of challenge and dominance, among the expectation of the group surveyed.   Collins describes Level 5 leaders as those in whom genuine personal humility blends with intense professional will.  Perhaps intensity is a key description for those leaders.  


NOTE that:

..."In at least three situations, a touch of jerkiness can be helpful.

1) ...if your job, or [an] element of it, involves a series of onetime encounters in which reputational blowback has minimal effect.
    

2) The second is in that evanescent moment [when] group has formed but its hierarchy has not.


Finally

[3 The third—not fully explored here, but worth mentioning—is when the group’s survival is in question, speed is essential, and a paralyzing existential doubt is in the air."  


(Numbering added by Deb)   

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Kudos's curator insight, July 21, 2015 11:56 AM

This is a really good article. I am not sure what does work best. But you are who you are. You are a jerk or you are a nice guy or girl but you can learn the competencies that will make you and your company successful if you tend to have nicer tendencies.

 

What I took away at the end of the article is you need these qualities to be a great leader:

Confidence
Competence
Expertise
Initiative
Passion
Vision

 

If you want people to follow you - you need to show people you care about success. People want to follow a winner.

 

You do not need to be a Jerk or Narcissist to get results but you need to be tough, direct and challenge people when it is appropriate to get results. Then appreciate them and give them Kudos when they do well. You then will develop shared behaviours that will make the whole company successful. Disagreeable Givers is a great term and worth striving for.

 

My favourite part was the Steve Jobs argument. He was a jerk and a narcissist and built a great company we all admire. But his Jerk tendencies got him fired and it was his kinder gentler self after he reflected on things in his exile that lead to his ultimate success on his return. He was a better leader when he came back. A little less of a total jerk and he actually did praise when appropriate and gave credit where credit was due. But he still pushed people relentlessly and they respected him for that because of the spill over effect. By him doing well, the whole team and company did well. He had the above qualities.

 

If he was the only one that did well - seeking money, prestige and acclaim - he would have been exiled again and the Apple would have failed. Hard to even imagine. But the question you have to ask - was his jerk behaviour the reason for the success or was Appel and Jobs successful despite his narcissistic tendencies? Hmmmm?

 

There are wartime CEO's and Peace time CEO's and they need to act differently to be successful based on the circumstances. Steve jobs was a very good wartime CEO.

 

But follow the rules of engagement and you will be successful all the time.

 

 

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SBA's Maria Contreras-Sweet knows entrepreneurship

SBA's Maria Contreras-Sweet knows entrepreneurship | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Contreras-Sweet is working to transform the SBA from a bureaucratic agency criticized for confusing loan programs into a modern, nimble resource for American entrepreneurs. 


________________________
   
“I was the blind leading myself through....I wish that I understood that I had counselors available to me.”  Maria Contreras-Sweet, head of the U.S. Small Business Administration

________________________



Contreras-Sweet:

  • Came to the U.S. from Guadalajara, Mexico, at age 5
   
  • Rose through the corporate ranks at the 7UP/RC Bottling Co. to become a vice president
    
  • Helped found Hispanas Organized for Political Equality, a non-profit promoting political and economic opportunities for Latinas
    
  • Became the first Latina in a California state cabinet position as secretary of business, transportation and housing in 1999
    
  • Founded of Contreras Sweet Enterprises, a consulting company

      

  • Founded Fortius Holdings LLC, a venture capital firm, and 
     
  • Founded ProAmerica Bank


Her work in the SBA

Since taking office in April 2014, Contreras-Sweet has:

  • Focused on improving small-business owners’ access to capital — one of the primary challenges entrepreneurs face
    
  • Extended a pre-existing policy that eliminates fees for SBA-guaranteed loans of $150,000 or less
    
  • Introduced LINC, an online matchmaking tool that pledges to connect businesses with SBA lenders within 48 hours, as well as SBA One, an automated lending platform that will roll out later in 2015. LINC and SBA One aim to increase the total number of SBA-guaranteed loans by making lenders easier to access and loan processing more efficient.
      

Contreras-Sweet says many businesses fail because they don’t get counseling.    ....much of her knowledge was built through trial and error as she started her own businesses. ....“I was the blind leading myself through this process,” she says. “I wish that I understood that I had counselors available to me.”

Related posts by Deb on Entrepreneurs, Leadership and Women in Business:

    

     

   

     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's takes long hours, and a network (a village) to be a successful small business owner.  This successful business entrepreneur, leader, immigrant, mother and Latina provides a perspective on the important of resources at all levels to support business success, including the support of her family.  ~  D

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Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster

Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

With nine FIFA executives under arrest, the organization that manages the World Cup [is] a poster child for governance gone wrong.


____________________________
 
Sepp Blatter is ...expected to win re-election, ...though a hairless bear would do less damage as president.”  

~ by Satirist John Oliver. HBO's Last Week Tonight,  this segment received 10 million YouTube views

____________________________
  

A brief synopsis of the 5 leadership lessons:
   

1. A HISTORY OF ETHICAL LAPSES
A pair of World Cups—planned for Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022— have allegations of bribery tied to the bidding process for each event.
     

2. RESISTANCE TO TRANSPARENCY
On occasions when corruption charges were investigated, FIFA worked to avoid public reporting and chose not to release reports in their original forms.
       

3. DEEP CULTURAL PROBLEMS
In one example, Michael J. Garcia, a former U.S. attorney for New York’s Southern District, claimed that a colleague on the Ethics Committee, Hans-Joachim Eckert, had misrepresented his report in a summary Eckert wrote that effectively cleared the way for the World Cups in Qatar and Russia to proceed.

     

4. FAILURE TO CHANGE
Two outside organizations produced change reports in 2011 and 2012, offering dozens of suggestions as to how to FIFA could solve its governance problems. However, few of these ideas have been implemented. 

      

5. LACK OF PUBLIC SUPPORT
“The crazy thing is, Sepp Blatter is widely expected to win re-election, [and he did] even though a hairless bear would do less damage as president,” satirist John Oliver said on his HBO program, Last Week Tonight, in a segment that has received more than 10 million views on YouTube.

    

As with all ScoopIt articles, click on the title or photo to see the full, original article.


Related articles in this series of three:

 Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.
   

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

    

4 Leadership Lessons from Horse-Guided Coaching (Reveln)



 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The president of FIFA has now resigned, after running for reelection in spite of the negative press and widely reported problems that happened during his leadership.  Do these 5 leadership problems resonate with what you know to be true about FIFA?  

Is it time to elect the hairless bear?  (See item 5 in the synopsis.) ~  Deb

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After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.

After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“…With the problems [it] faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA…worth being saved?”
 

...the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed its 47-count indictment against those individuals has focused on how FIFA’s governance structure—which gives its 209 member-nations and each one’s soccer association equal voting rights—made it susceptible to widespread wrongdoing.
    
_________________________________
   
…change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture …[What are] the shared set of values that [transcend] all of those cultural differences?” ~ Jean Frankel

_________________________________
   
     
So with all of the problems it faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA an organization capable of, or even worth, being saved?

Jean Frankel, president of Ideas for Action, LLC, certainly thinks so.

“Organizations like these do have a place, and they’re essential in the grand scheme of things,” she said. “World football is the biggest sport on earth, so you need a governing body of this large sport. You need somebody to set the rules, promote the sport, and do all of those positive things.”

_________________________________


Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 

_________________________________

Frankel, who recently helped the NCAA navigate a massive governance overhaul, said she sees a number of similarities between the two organizations.
   
“People asked that question of the NCAA: Do we need them? Can’t the [collegiate athletics] conferences just govern themselves?” she said. “Of course, the answer to that was ‘no.’ The conferences can’t govern themselves, because you need to have one place where a consensus has to be reached, where governance and oversight can happen.”

A fix for FIFA could even borrow from the model the NCAA ultimately landed on, said Frankel, which included weighted voting.

“It worked for the NCAA, because it was the closest thing that you could have to some kind of level playing field,” she said. “Large conferences in the NCAA and large countries in the soccer world have more resources and more to gain and lose.”

....But change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture than anything, explained Frankel.  ....Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 


Read more about Jean Frankel, the NCAA governance story, and the Ideas for Action group here.  Full disclosure below.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Jean's comments indicate a positive organizational scholarship informed vision of change, how deeply flawed organizations can use their flaws as a pivot point to get back on the straight and narrow.  The article, available in full here, highlights what worked for the NCAA in turning their organization around.
   
_______________________________

Tensions ran high enough that the largest schools began to consider the possibility of breaking away to form their own organization.  

_______________________________

      

Excerpt:  Think it’s hard for your board to work effectively? Try doing so while under constant scrutiny from the public and media—and even congress. That’s exactly what the NCAA, college sports’ governing body, faced as it restructured its governance model..

I believe this could be either a great example of large scale system positive change or of failure.  This is based on knowing the NCAA story of how governance can be fixed, of how to lead change based in what's NOT working, how how those exact dysfunctional aspects of an organization can be the basis for renewal and rebirth, of being made new again.   Full disclosure, I've joined the Ideas for Action group this spring, because of Jean and because of the bench strength of the organization.

 

 

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People Over Profit: Why Two Small Countries Stood Up to Big Mining, And the Fight Continues

People Over Profit: Why Two Small Countries Stood Up to Big Mining, And the Fight Continues | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

If the governments of Costa Rica and El Salvador can resist the mining industry, maybe we all can, but not without a fight:  Mining firms are suing governments for policies that impeded future profits.   


______________________
   
.....global mining companies are trying to ensure that no government is allowed to say no.

 ______________________
   


One is the tiny nation of El Salvador, where the government stopped issuing gold mining permits half a decade ago. The Salvadoran government did so despite sky-high gold prices and the argument that exporting gold was one of the country's few chances to boost aggregate economic growth (in the short-term, at least).
      

They did so largely because the majority of Salvadorans get water from one large river system, and gold mining invariably pollutes nearby rivers and watersheds.    ...El Salvador is not alone in its policies. The government of Costa Rica has said no to open-pit mining. (While open-pit mining is only one method of mining, it is among the most environmentally destructive.)
     
Costa Rica's Congress subsequently voted for a no-new-open-pit-mining law—unanimously. That no was upheld by Costa Rica's Supreme Court.
    

Governments can say no to a false notion of development that would do little besides line the pockets of elite corporate interests, while leaving devastated ecosystems in its wake.   ....But global mining companies are trying to ensure that no government is allowed to say no.
     

These corporations are making their cases based on a controversial Central America "free trade" agreement with the United States, and on El Salvador's former investment law (written with the help of the World Bank), which opened the door for mining firms to sue governments for policies that impeded future profits.   
   
In February 2014, Infinito announced that, rather than accept the Supreme Court rejection of its appeal, it was filing an investor-state case against the Costa Rican government at the World Bank's ICSID. Infinito is suing Costa Rica for the $94 million it claims to have invested so far.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a cautionary tale of profiteering and corporatism at the global level.  The author suggests we support the right of governments to say no to rapacious mining.  It may be there are many other type of global actions that can destroy the environment in other nations when putting profits above people.   Just passing along this awareness can make a difference.  ~  Deb 

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Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey

Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

A case study of change at Philips illustrates the importance of the “soft stuff.”

   

Pieter Nota: For [many] reasons, the [top] team was insecure and couldn’t understand why things were going so badly. The top-team survey we did in May 2011, in preparation for our first off-site meeting, exposed some of the challenges—...how misaligned we were on the direction of the business, the poor quality of our discussions, the lack of trust, the lack of confidence in our ability to implement strategy, and the perception that we were ineffective at making change happen.


________________________
   
...everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not...a pivotal moment.

________________________

      

     
The Quarterly: How and when did you go about starting to rebuild the team?
    
Pieter Nota: I...I think our first big off-site meeting—in May 2011, at Huizen, in the Netherlands—was significant. ...we put the issues on the table. Two things remain clearly etched in my memory.

    

  • One is a no-holds-barred conversation on team loyalty, which emphasized the importance of our values, our core purpose, and the essential notion of trust. 

      

  • The second is the introduction of some critical new thinking on how to improve the quality of our operations and implementation capabilities.

     
...I knew that I did not have all my team members on board and that this needed to be addressed. Even after my predecessor had gone, some who had been in his very close circle were continuing to have conversations with him. During the opening of the off-site meeting, this topic had already come up. We ended up spending three hours talking about the past, clearing the air, and gaining a better understanding of each other. At the end, everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not. That was a pivotal moment.
     

Related change posts by Deb:

                                                   

    

     

         
  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here,via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Asking "what's working" and "what's not" is where it began.  This Phillips leader also knew how to communicate and prepare, including setting up an crucial off-site meeting to rebuild and renew the top leadership including a  'pivotal moment" of trust building and commitment among the top team's leader.  This gave them thinking time and space, "slow is fast" to allow them to let go of their legacy leadership and embrace the new strategy and vision, or choose to be somewhere else.
    
Soft skills are always a central part of change leader excellence.

~ Deb

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Crowdfunding Phenom: Kickstarter CEO Yancey Strickler on Success, Copycats, and 'Broken Promises'

Crowdfunding Phenom:  Kickstarter CEO Yancey Strickler on Success, Copycats, and 'Broken Promises' | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The crowdfunding model is now a mini-cottage industry, thanks to Kickstarter, and yes, he's been spoofed by 'South Park.'

Excerpts:

...When did the concept of crowdfunding first click for you?

In 2005. I had these artist and musician friends with day jobs that they hated, but they couldn’t afford to just do art or music. There’s a widespread assumption that creative things just magically happen, and they don’t. Creation requires funding.

    

....(order changed)  Today, millions of people use the site each day, adding up to a daily average of $1 million in pledges (some 70,000 campaigns have launched on the site). 

      

...Are there plans to grow the staff?

Actually, no. I think we’ll get to 100 people, but not much beyond that in the near future. Being a small company [means we are] light on costs, and I like the scrappiness of trying to accomplish a lot with a little. There’s far more shared ownership with a small team.
     
...Are you threatened by ...copycat competitors?

I’ve always known others would copy our idea, but to be honest, we’ve always been the strongest product. ....and for most of our measurements -- dollars pledged, site visitors, project supporters -- there’s a huge gulf between us and the rest of the field.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

FOR THE WIN:  Spot on great ideas, carried to full implementation and sustained in good faith, with some bumps in the road. Overall good ideas, good will and smart business practices will win the day, says I.   As an consultant, there's a lot to like about Kickstarter, including my favorite value in the work world, "choice."  We have a lot that is industrial age about our still new, burgeoning information age.  Fortunately, Kickstarter the concept, and the reality, is not one of them.

I've also included crowdfunding and crowdsourcing as a community building, ownership trend that field of Organization Development (OD), among others, is ignoring in a digital chapter on its way to publication for Wiley for Practicing OD, 2015 edition.

 

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Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:49 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Transform from Industrial Age Design: BetaCodex - Turn Your Company Outside-In!

How to build a devolved cell structured organization and leave the old, slow and bureaucratic structures behind.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

                

          

     

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Beta Codex network has the thinking and design that will help us finally leave old command and control structures, individualistic thinking behind.  Scientific management had its day, back in the 1950's in wide open economic markets.  In competitive, global, digitally powered, high speed markets, hierarchy is so last century.   It's time to change to agile, cellular design that is as adaptable as the next mobile phone operating system.  ~  Deb 

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A new Structure, a new Culture at Microsoft. Why They May get Things Really Right

A new Structure, a new Culture at Microsoft. Why They May get Things Really Right | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"One Microsoft" is a good example of a strategy that meets today's challenges. Success will come from a HR innovation and cultural transformation, (DN) if they can make it work.


__________________________
     
What is a system favoring careerism worth if it’s to the detriment of the rest of the company, of customers, of stakeholders ? Nothing. 

__________________________

       

“One strategy, One Microsoft” : that’s how Steve Ballmer explained the urgency to move to a product based organization to a function based one involving all product lines in a cross-organization approach.


...The move from a divisional organization to a functional one is everything but easy. 

   

What is a system favoring careerism worth if it’s to the detriment of the rest of the company, of customers, of stakeholders ? Nothing. On the other hand a functional organization is customer and solution driven rather than product driven.


...there’s no better way to kill collaboration, cross-silos work and even innovation than strictly allocating resources on a silo-based fashion.

In short a divisional organization measures its own success, even to the detriment of customers and stakeholders, a functional one measures its success to the value and benefits it creates for others.


The full post is here.



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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If they can make it work, it will be one of the biggest change and culture success stories of the decade.  The careerism quote above is a gem.  Time and customers will tell.  ~  D

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