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Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders

Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

#1, Pope Francis has electrified the church and attracted legions of non-Catholic admirers by energetically setting a new direction. He has refused to occupy the palatial papal apartments, has washed the feet of a female Muslim prisoner, is driven around Rome in a Ford Focus, and famously asked "Who am I to judge?" with regard to the church's view of gay members.
     
He created a group of eight cardinals to advise him on reform, which a church historian calls the "most important step in the history of the church for the past 10 centuries."  ... S
gns of a "Francis effect" abound: In a poll in March, one in four Catholics said they'd increased their charitable giving to the poor this year. Of those, 77% said it was due in part to the Pope.

   

Others on the list, excerpted:

    
#2 Angela Merkel, 59, Chancellor, Germany, may be the most successful national leader in the world today. She is the leader of the European Union, which as a whole is the world's largest economy, and Merkel has held that position for almost nine years. She played the lead role in managing Europe's debt crisis, keeping the EU intact while setting even Greece on the road to recovery.

       

#3 Alan Mulally, 68, CEO, Ford Motor Co.  Ford's miracle worker saved the company without resorting to bankruptcy or bailouts by doing what previous leaders had tried and failed to do: change Ford's risk-averse, reality-denying, CYA-based culture. After earning $7.2 billion of profit last year -- far more than General Motors  GM -0.25%  or Chrysler -- the company paid its 47,000 UAW workers a record $8,800 each in profit sharing.

     

#4 Warren Buffett, 83, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway, leads 300,000 employees with a values-based, hands-off style that gives managers wide leeway and incentivizes them like owners. The result is America's fifth-most-valuable company.
   

Also on the list of 50:

Bill Clinton, 68, Founder, The Clinton Foundation
Aung San Suu Kyi, 68, Chair, National League for Democracy
Gen. Joe Dunford, 58, Commander, U.S. Forces, Afghanistan
Bono, 53,Lead singer, U2
Dalai Lama, 78, Spiritual leader of the Tibetan people
Jeff Bezos, 50, CEO, Amazon.com

 

         

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The full list of 50 is worth a review even though it came out this past March.  Most of these change leaders will stand the test of time. As of November 2014, the #1 spot of Argentine Pope Frances, who exemplifies change leadership, with influence far beyond several billions of Catholics worldwide.  Ex-Catholics, if it were a denomination, would be the third largest group, and yet his message carries further to so many more of the world's citizens.
     
My half Argentine heritage speaks  to one thing I know of many Argentines, including Pope Frances ~ they are challengers.

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Classic: What is success? Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum

Classic:  What is success?  Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Philosopher Peter Koestenbaum poses the truly big questions: How do we act when risks seem overwhelming? What does it mean to be a successful human being?

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How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

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{Have you asked yourself:]  How in the world did I get here? Or wrestled with ...strategic choices -- all of which seem hard and unpleasant -- and said, What happened to the fun part of being in business? According to Peter Koestenbaum, those uncomfortable questions -- those existential quandaries -- are at the root of issues that great leaders deal with all the time, and they influence every decision that must be made.
  
More than 25 years ago, Koestenbaum traded the cloistered halls of academia for the front lines of the global economy. It's not unheard-of for this philosopher, a tireless 71-year-old with thick glasses and a flowing beard, to visit clients across three continents in a single week. His agenda: to apply the power of philosophy to the big question of the day -- how to reconcile the often-brutal realities of business with basic human values -- and to create a new language of effective leadership. ...The more you understand the human condition, the more effective you are as a businessperson. Human depth makes business sense."

     

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Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. 

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Koestenbaum's wisdom makes sense to leaders at such giant organizations as Ford, EDS, Citibank, Xerox, Ericsson, and even one of Korea's chaebols. ... At Ford, Koestenbaum contributed to the company's 2,000-person Senior Executive Program throughout the 1980s. In more than a decade at EDS, he led seminars and coached hundreds of top executives, including then-chairman Les Alberthal. 


"Everything I do," says Koestenbaum, "is about using themes from the history of thought to rescue people who are stuck." His logic: Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. But too many people and too many companies approach change by treating it as a technical challenge rather than by developing authentic answers to basic questions about business life. 


WHY DOES BEING A LEADER FEEL SO HARD TODAY?

Because reckoning with freedom is always hard ...We're living in a peculiar time: It's marked by a soaring stock market, the creation of tremendous wealth, an explosion in innovation, and the acute alienation that occurs when the global economy hits the average individual. 

The message is, You're living in the best country in the world at the best time in history; you have an amazing degree of freedom to do what you want, along with an unprecedented opportunity to build immense wealth and success -- and to do it more quickly than ever before. Of course, the average individual has as much of a chance of launching a skyrocketing IPO as he or she has of becoming a movie star. 

       
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There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. ...There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change.

________________________________

       

What's even more disturbing is that the ascendancy of shareholder value as the dominant driving force in business has resulted in a terrible insensitivity to basic human values. 

THAT'S A HEAVY BURDEN TO PLACE ON LEADERS. THEY MUST NOT ONLY GUIDE ORGANIZATIONS BUT ALSO WRESTLE WITH BASIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS.


There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change. The average person is...riveted by the objective domain...where our metrics are; that's where we look for solutions. ...That's why books and magazines that have numbers in their titles sell so well.


We'll do anything to avoid facing the basic, underlying questions: How do we make truly difficult choices? How do we act when the risks seem overwhelming? How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

     

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...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. 
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There's nothing wrong with all of those technical solutions. They're excellent; they're creative; they're even necessary. But they shield us from the real issues: What kind of life do I want to lead? What is my destiny? How much evil am I willing to tolerate?

      

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. When you grapple with polarities in your life, you lose your arrogant, self-indulgent illusions, and you realize that the joke is on you. To get that message makes you a more credible human being -- instantly. 

===
As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

    

         

    

          

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

          

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've recently learned that this classic article is the most downloaded article from Fast Company.  If you read it, you'll see why.  It asks the beautiful, and extraordinarily difficult questions about business and life. Changing perspective, and ultimately changing attitudes, is the big challenge in making lasting change fully sustainable.~  D

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Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice: New Research on Why

Women CEOs and the Glass Precipice:  New Research on Why | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Carly Fiorina, forced out. A MERE 5% of the chief executives of the world’s biggest companies are women. And they are more likely to be sacked than their more numerous male colleagues: 38% of the female CEOs who left their jobs over the past ten years were forced to go, compared with 27% of the men. 
     
In the Strategy& study, the clumsy new name for Booz & Company, 35% of female CEOs are hired from outside the company, compared with just 22% of male ones.

  • Outsiders generally have a higher chance of being kicked out, 
  • Generate lower returns to shareholders
  • Outsiders are less likely to have a support network of friends who can rally around when times get tough. 
         

Carly Fiorina, dropped as HP’s boss in 2005, made things worse by inviting such publicity. But the same is not true of, say, Ginni Rometty, the lower-profile boss of IBM (promoted from within the company in 2012), who is under fire over the firm’s performance.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.


                   

              


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The change leader implication, as described in the article, is the call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping diminish raiding due to scarce supply, which tends to be counterproductive for women's careers anyway, and 3) increasing success by having more women available to promote from within.  ~ Deb


Also posted to Careers and Self-Aware Strength.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 9:11 AM

This is a useful gender perspective on leadership development and, as the article concludes, a call to action on 1) developing the leadership pipeline for female future CEOs,  2) helping to prevent raiding because of scarce supply, (and it's counterproductive anyway, the research suggests) and 3) increasing success by having more women to promote from within.  ~  Deb

Tamkin Amin's curator insight, May 15, 5:03 PM

hmmm... I find this interesting.

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Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That.

Not Many Women Are Rising to the Top. Women Executives Seize the Day to Change That. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research show how these top executives have taken charge of their careers.

     

It’s the responsibility of management to tackle gender diversity..[and]… evidence suggests that our leaders aren’t doing a very good job of it, at least not yet.


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[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program. 

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Women still represent less than 5% of CEOs around the globe, and they remain seriously underrepresented in other top management positions and on executive boards.

     

[T]here’s no reason for an ambitious woman to sit on the sidelines and wait for her boss to get with the program.  … Lauren Ready concluded [this] from a study she did here at the International Consortium for Executive Development Research, in which she interviewed 60 top female executives from around the world to learn how they rose to the top.

   

For one, these executives take the time to explore what they want out of work and life [photo, chart.]

One byproduct…they pay special attention to how they might fit within a company’s culture.

    

This finding is consistent with research from Harvard professor Boris Groysberg, who’s found that while the performance of male stars falters when they switch companies, women continue to excel, in part because they’ve done their homework when it comes to fit.

   

The women in Ready’s study also understand the limits of fit. They aren’t “one of the guys” and they don’t try to be.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's still a man's world in the executive ranks, even in the college town where I live, the land of start-ups, women sparsely populate the fast growing, entrepreneurial executive ranks.  


It is also good to reach that the qualities listed in Ready's research among high-achieving women includes the urge to bring other women along with them.   It's a way ambitious women can "lean it" with a little help from her friends in high places, for the savvy reason that the executives "view [it] as a way to raise their companies’ market value, by boosting the presence of women in senior roles and in boardrooms."  


This brings hope that leadership will someday represent the world, rather than tradition and history in the leadership ranks.  ~  D 

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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, April 14, 1:02 AM

There is sexism in the workplace, and I'll do my best to keep it out of my future classroom. I think that feminism has the potential to be taken overboard, by way of radicals, and that a 'humanism' is a better approach. Equality is obviously better than some of the superiority complexes associated with oppression ideologies gone awry; something I hope doesn't happen to feminism in the coming years as we combat this women-don't-riseto-the-top trend.

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High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014

High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Surprising news:  New firms account for a smaller share of the tech sector than in previous decades. > HBR Blog & a recent Kaufman report.


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....the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. 

     

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America’s high-tech sector has become less dynamic and less entrepreneurial in the last decade via  a recent Kauffman Foundation report writer Ian Hathaway co-authored.


...The high-tech sector is experiencing a consolidation of activity away from young firms into more mature ones, and the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. ....high-tech companies have been well-represented among the fastest growing firms in the past few years, the high-tech sector–like the rest of the economy–is less dynamic overall.



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....Business dynamism involves...new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.

   
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...Business dynamism involves measuring ...businesses ...being formed, growing, shrinking, and closing....churning: jobs are created while others are destroyed, and some workers move into new roles as others seek to replace them. New and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.


...Entrepreneurs also play an outsized role in new job creation. While older and larger firms account for the substantial majority of employment levels, new and growing young firms drive net new job creation overall.


....Research has firmly established that this process of “creative destruction” fuels productivity growth, making it indispensable to our sustained economic prosperity. ...a more dynamic economy is a key to higher growth.


Read the full blog post here


Photo credit, thenext28days on Flickr, ccc.

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

     

      

       

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The business dynamism or creative dynamism of which Ian Hathaway speaks seems has a kinship to Anti-Fragile concepts, especially, how  "new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones."  ~  D

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Most Creative People 2013

Most Creative People 2013 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The 2013 global leaders in technology design media music movies marketing television sports and more. What have you learned from the world's most creative, successful leaders?


Excerpts:

2.  THE GALAXY GUIDE

Samsung--under the design direction of Dong-hoon Chang--has been killing the smartphone game, from the gargantuan Galaxy Note 2, which further popularized the “phablet” trend, to the Galaxy S III, which briefly unseated the iPhone last year as the best-selling phone in the world. To gather ideas during the development of the S III, Chang led his design team on a city-hopping observation tour around the globe, from hot-air-balloon rides in Africa to Singapore’s Skypark on the Marina Bay. He says the travels inspired the S III’s oval, pebblelike shape and shimmery color, as well as the water-ripple effect of its touch screen. 



4.  KIRTHIGA REDDY, DIRECTOR OF ONLINE OPERATIONS, FACEBOOK INDIATHE GLOBAL MOBILE ALL-STAR

When Kirthiga Reddy opened Facebook's India office in 2010, the site had just 8 million users in a nation of 1.2 billion people. Since then, she's grown Facebook India ninefold, to 71 million as of the end of 2012--healthy growth, given that only a tenth of Indians have Internet access.



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The headline offers, "the value of creativity at a crucial time in business."  ~  D

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First Ranking Of Top 30 CEOs On Social Media

First Ranking Of Top 30 CEOs On Social Media | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

This is the first global ranking of CEOs on social media - the pioneers and early adopters. Their impact is prompting other CEOs to rethink their position on social media.


The link includes a handy chart of the top social media savvy leaders including:


Rank, Twitter Username, Followers, LinkedIn Influencer followers, Klout Score, Number of Tweets and "Our Take (CEO of Xinfu, Host of BBC World of CEOs.com.)

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Included on the list:  

  • Rupert Murdock,  (media mogul)
  • Elon Musk (Tesla Motors CEO, also profiled in another of my ScoopIts regarding innovation & change) 
  • JeffImmelt, CEO of GE
  • Jack Welch (now at Jack Welch Management Institute), Angela Ahrendts, CEO of Burberry and 
  • Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna


 ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, July 20, 2013 4:59 PM

It will be interesting to see how this picture changes over the next year. While Richard Branson is currently the undisputed CEO social champion nothing lasts forever on social media. He has a loyal following but even he sees wildly varying engagement levels depending on the quality of what he posts.

Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 21, 2013 1:20 AM

Our goal was to combine the best of both approaches, taking into account both quantitative and qualitative measures to determine the top 30 CEOs on social media.

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How Rejection Can Inspire Great Movements: The Story Of MAKERS

How Rejection Can Inspire Great Movements: The Story Of MAKERS | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"You can’t tell the story of the women’s movement through one person," Gloria Steinhem.

Veteran documentary producer Dyllan McGee has worked on more than a dozen films for PBS and HBO, but MAKERS is unlike anything she’s ever created.


First of its kind...the entire idea was born out rejection.


What came out of that first roadblock flipped the script ...


MAKERS evolved into a “digital first” online platform for archiving dozens of interviews with feminist trailblazers, an approach that the Washington Post called a “sweeping documentary covering 50 years of feminism, pro and con, from the days when highly educated women were expected to live happily ever after as wives and mothers.”


Interview subjects include well-known women leaders like Condoleezza RiceSheryl Sandberg, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg alongside lesser-known women with powerful stories like Brenda Berkman, the first NYC firefighter, and Kathrine Switzer, the first woman to run the Boston marathon.


Related posts by Deb:  

    

  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

MAKERS is a powerful documentary and series.  I've posted one of my own "rejection" stories (Entre-Slam) that made a big difference in my career and launched my work as a consultant back in the 80's.  


MAKERS is about listening to a persistent inner voice and turning points, as well as "resistance as a resource."  ~ Deb

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8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes

8 Powerful Speaking Lessons from 57 Inaugural Speeches:  The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"To date, there have been 44 United States presidents - on  January 21st Barack Obama delivered the 57th Inaurgural Address."



Here are excerpts from eight (8) lessons the author, Margaret M. Perlis, learned from the best and worst of the inaugural addresses including:


Excerpts:


Keep It Real:  James Buchanan, our 15th president, was one of the worst in American history, when the issues of slavery and secession were reaching a boiling point. While Buchanan rejected slavery...he refused to challenge the constitutional establishment...and states that were threatening secession.


...His inauguration speech ...diminish(es) the severity of impending conflicts by peppering it with words like “simple” or “happy.”


Know Your Audience, Understand Your Outcome:


Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address was delivered to a war-torn and weary nation.  ...Lincoln’s brief 600-word address, ....one of the most powerful in U.S. history ...spurned triumphalism, instead choosing a tone of magnanimity: “both sides read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invoked His aid against the other.” 


Read the full text here.


For examples of the power of story, see these two examples:

A personal and a human story of overcoming adversity via a classic from Deb's blog:

Several story & case study examples of how to build agility in a volatile business climate:
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Via the highest office of the land, USA, change & progress is portrayed in ways that work and ways that do not, showing that storytelling and speeches are important to the leadership art of inspiration and influence.  ~  Deb


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J.C. Penny update: Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure?

J.C. Penny update:  Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change.

   

Ron Johnson's bold overhaul of the sagging American retailing icon J.C. Penny went too far too fast.


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Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.


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 When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe."

  

Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

  

How fast are your customers willing to change?

 

Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients.

  

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Electrolux's  70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.


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Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

  

Electrolux, has implemented a new "70% rule" for testing its new product innovations to make sure it's not getting too far ahead or falling too quickly behind either its customers or competitors.

 

Electrolux CEO Keith McLoughlin has declared that new product prototypes have to enjoy at least a 70% customer preference rate in blind competition with best-selling rival products. "

 

Speed to market" isn't what's driving the change.

 

The goal is assuring that the firm's ability to innovate is effectively aligned with the customers' willingness to value them. The 70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's alluring, thinking it is about getting the amount of change just right.  Wrong focus.  It is about where and who the customers area, and how adaptable and ready they are for change.


On the individual level, it's also about preferences for change.  The assessment tool, iWam (the Inventory for Work Attitude and Motivation) has a "clock" feature that shows individual preferences for change.  

As goes the individual, probably so goes the customer culture, witness the articles overview of the tech market and the appliances market.  ~ D

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The fatal car crash that altered China's change of leadership

The fatal car crash that altered China's change of leadership | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The infamous, and fake:  “Thank you. I'm well. Don't worry,” on a Chinese social networking site marked the beginning of the end during  leadership succession last month. ~ The Scotsman


This cautionary tales provides an anatomy of fractured succession in the high echelons of Chinese political leadership. ~ D


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...the crash had more momentous consequences, altering the course of ...once-in-a-decade leadership succession  

_______________________


Excerpts:


The brief comment, published in June, appeared to come from Ling Gu, the 23-year-old son of a high-powered aide to China’s president.  Tt helped quash reports that he had been killed in a Ferrari crash after a night of partying.


However, later it came out the message was false, posted by someone under Mr Ling’s alias almost three months after his death.


The ploy was one of many that tried to suppress news of the Ferrari crash that killed Mr Ling. It is now clearer that the crash had more momentous consequences, altering the course of the Chinese Communist Party’s once-in-a-decade leadership succession last month.


China’s departing president, Hu Jintao,  suffered a massive reversal of his own when party elders – confronted him with allegations that Ling Jihua, his closest protégé and political fixer, had engineered the cover-up of his son’s death.


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Sustainability is about Impact! The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come

Sustainability is about Impact!  The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"It's the double bottom line, baby!  ESPECIALLY if you are in non-profit leadership today."

  

I just heard Jeanne Bell, CEO and author of NonProfit Sustainability talk honestly about the double bottom line in her own business as well as in her consulting engagements.  Her fresh, tested perspective rings true.

  

In a nutshell:

  

  • ...in the mythic past it was possible to think first about strategic impact goals, and then about how to raise the money. ...today...you can't talk about what you're going to do without talking about how to get the money. And, you can't talk about how to get money without talking about what you're going to do.
  
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Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it.
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Here are some gems from her presentation today in Flint, Michigan as well as a great Scooped article by her.  Flint is an appropriate setting; it's a place that has seen hard times and where the BEST Funders Collaborative brings in stellar talent to keep non-profits doing what they do best.
     
  • Declare change as constant.
  • Model change by turning down money not headed in the right direction.  We have some agency over this – don’t have to jump to funders. "
  • Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it.
  • Use good tools, frameworks.
  • DO NOT confuse strategy and planning. 
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What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow.
_______________________
         
Excerpted gems from the article:
   
  • If the financial goal in a for-profit company is to maximize profit, should our goal as a nonprofit be to have $0 profit? Or should the goal be to grow an endowment of $10 million, or to have a surplus of 5%, or a deficit of no more than $50,000?
     
  • The financial goal of a nonprofit is to ensure that it has adequate working capital; that is, its financial goal is to have enough money to do its work over the long term. Today we often use the term sustainability...
     
  •  What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. ...We never arrive at a mix of programs and revenue streams that can be described as permanently sustainable. But we can always be heading in the right direction.
      
   
Read about Jeanne's dual bottom line here.   
   

Related to this, read Deb's article on strategic agility (the end of strategic planning) here.
      
Now I'm hearing Paul Saginaw, co-founder of the very successful Zingermans community of businesses in Ann Arbor talk about founding Food Gatherers, feeding the hungry in Ann Arbor.  Quite the point.
   
Photo above: Jeanne Bell, Steve Zimmerman and Jan Masaoka (left to right in photo) are all former nonprofit CFOs and they all appreciate the environmental aspects of sustainability as well. Jeanne is now CEO of CompassPoint Nonprofit Services.
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Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward

Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"This provocative post highlights current business paradoxes challenging leaders:  change or remain stable, complexity versus simplicity, growth and sustainability and more."


After seeing evidence of our increasingly VUCA world, one that is growing in its Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous characteristics, this useful list of paradoxes resonates.  Does it resonate to your experience?

 

___________________________

  

Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

___________________________

   


Excerpted:

  

Paradox 1: growth versus sustainability

Growth as it is currently defined tends to result in an unquestioned and unchecked consumption of resources. Sustainability considerations are generally considered to put a major strain on growth ambitions.


The way forward is innovation, but another paradox present itself:

  

Paradox 2: innovating versus operating

Innovation is increasingly about service, process, business model and social innovation.

However, focusing on innovation does not mean ignoring operations. The trick is that what allows operations to thrive can seriously get in the way of innovation and vice versa.

  

Paradox 3:  change versus continuity

If you try to innovate too many things at once you will end up with chaos, if you do not change at all your organisation will decline. What is the right balance?

  

Paradox 4: collaboration versus competition

Business is inherently competitive yet today, collaboration is common, with most companies having collaborated with their suppliers and their customers. Leading companies are promoting collaboration through crowdsourcing or with competitors.

  

Paradox 5: complexity versus simplicity

Demands on leaders result in increasing levels of complexity, arising from the number of possible, unpredictable interactions between collaborate, compete; change, remain stable; innovation or operational excellence; growth or sustainability. Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

  

Paradox 6: Heart versus mind

Decisions need to be made in the face of incomplete analysis, unpredictable outcomes and changing circumstances. The foundations for analysis and factual arguments differ from emotional and visionary engagement; people who excel at one are not necessarily particularly good at the other and yet both are needed.

  

Read the full article by Dr Bettina von Stamm here.

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Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign

Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Photo: Carl Reiner, actor, 92, at his home in Beverly Hills

   

Excerpts:

The portraits here are of men and women in their 80s and 90s, rich in the rewards of substantial and celebrated careers… Why do they persist, the old masters? …The short answer: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” ~ Dr. Samuel Johnson

    

Examples:

      

Edward O. Wilson, naturalist and author, 85

  

NYT: You are the world’s foremost expert on ants, and now you’re asking about the meaning of human existence and the future of humanity. Has growing older pushed you to these bigger questions?

    

EW: I couldn’t have asked these questions before. I was too engaged in the hands-on research, especially in the field.

     

NYT: So how has age contributed to your more recent books?

I think age contributed a great deal to [his] recent trilogy of books. First because I feel I have enough experience to join those who are addressing big questions. Second …I was astonished at how little this was being done. I’ve come to appreciate that we’re wrecking the planet… The public response …[has] been unacceptably weak.

       

Ginette Bedard, long-distance runner, 81, Howard Beach, Queens.

Bedard will run in her 12th consecutive New York City Marathon this year.

     

NYT: You ran your first marathon at age 69. How did you do?

    

GB: I came in second in my age group, I think 65 to 69, and the next year I came in first. And I think I was 72 when I beat the world record for my age group, 3:46 or :45.

     

Carl Reiner, actor, 92, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Reiner published his second memoir, ‘‘I Just Remembered,’’ this year.

    

NYT: Has the process of writing for you changed?

      

CR: It has not changed. I still only write from the gut, I can only write about what I know. The only thing I research is if I’m writing about someone I don’t know. Thank God for Google. Otherwise I go by the seat of my pants

   

Roy Haynes, jazz drummer and bandleader, 89, Long Island. Haynes’s latest album was ‘‘Roy-Alty,’’ released in 2011.

    

NYT:  You travel a lot, and it sounds as if you have no intention of slowing down.

     

RH:  I’ve been traveling since 1945. …drumming’s just a continuous way of life. And it’s still going on. I’ve been doing this longer than I’ve been doing anything else.

    

NYT:  What keeps you going?

   

RH:  You get to be this age, you think you know a little more about life. With my traveling around, it’s quite exciting, and I’m sure it keeps me young. A lot of the people I play with are much younger than me. Young enough to be my children or my grandchildren. People say I look young. The average person if they asked how old I was wouldn’t expect me to be the age I am.

          

NYT:  But how do you maintain your stamina?

        

RH:  I don’t know. If I knew, I’d just write a book on that and forget playing drums. I’d become richer.

      

Related posts by Deb:

     

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work   

    

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

     

 Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

    

• Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

           

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Learning from our elders, vibrant and accomplished, is a good way of also preparing for the future.  It is notable that the arts are well represented here, and in that, art is life.  ~  Deb

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Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op

Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Zingerman's Community of Businesses is a staple of Ann Arbor, and it's achieved great success through highly unorthodox practices.


The flagship deli, founded in 1982, is now just one of nine businesses in the Zingerman's Community of Businesses, which also includes a bakery, creamery, candy company, and restaurant.


These businesses are founded on a unique philosophy without traditional business hierarchy.  Zingerman's emphasize collective decision-making.  [Now] ...the company is on track to make $50 million this fiscal year.


A worker co-op is an old business model that has seen renewed interest post-recession due to a lack of investors creating jobs in communities.


Zingerman's has been focused on getting its employees to think like owners long before hard economic times.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer as competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 20, 7:33 PM

As I commented originally on Change Leadership Watch:  Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
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Compensation Bloat? University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter

Compensation Bloat?  University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

An open letter to University of Michigan's Board of Regents from about a dozen of the school's faculty criticizes the school's administrative pay and bonus system. "The University is in desperate and urgent need of fiscal reform." 


____________________
   
The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements...some administrators received...in excess of $50,000.

     

____________________


The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements, and that they are an unwise use of money from the general fund. Data obtained by the professors show that some administrators received salary supplements in excess of $50,000.

  

...Anthony Mora, a history professor who helped author the letter, said that while it's reasonable executive officers have higher compensation that most staff, U-M's compensation rates for those officers are between 27 and 41 percent higher than the rates' of administrators at peer institutions such as Berkeley, Texas and Virginia, according to a review done by the faculty.
 

"We want to have an open and candid discussion about the university's resources," Mora said. "I don't see this as an effort to be adversarial with the administration. I think people in the administration are genuine when they say they care about the university. But I do think there's an opportunity here for the faculty and the administration to work together."

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

       

              

  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Several faculty have taken up the gauntlet to question escalating costs - starting with higher education administrative bonuses.  Executive bonuses may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these, perhaps prompted by the poorly planned, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  which, incidentally, did NOT include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning.


It also involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices, and perhaps stepping higher education back to a bigger picture of where the value generation resides and how it needs to be valued today.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 3:59 PM

The escalating costs of higher education may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these from the core of  the university system, the faculty.

The article also referenced the initially poorly implemented, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  that did not include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning and involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices.   ~  Deb


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Yahoo says Marissa Mayer has fixed its biggest problem

Yahoo says Marissa Mayer has fixed its biggest problem | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

In September 2012, shortly after Marissa Mayer took charge of Yahoo, she moved swiftly to try and rectify what was considered the search giant's biggest problem: a lack of talent.

Yahoo has been on an acquisition spree—or ...an acqui-hire spree, buying some 37 companies ...the biggest of which was the $1.1 billion purchase of blogging service, Tumblr.


Competition for talent in Silicon Valley is fierce.   [And yet]...Yahoo's  ...annual report, claims that it received more than 340,000 job applications in 2013, double the number in 2012. According to the career site Glassdoor, Yahoo was the third-highest-paying company in Silicon Valley for engineers last year, behind Juniper Networks and LinkedIn.

Related tools & posts by Deb:


        


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.
    
     
     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It looks like Mayer's decisive moves are paying off.  She continues to be a change leader to watch.  

I'm a Flickr fan,  another Yahoo property.  Changes are happening there too, at a pace that makes sense for the venerable, and loved photo sharing site.  It's an oldie, but a goodie, and her change planners and engineers are in launching a much needed refurbishing while  listening to its long loyal base of retaining desired, key features.  

In change, we could also do with some good pacing and more listening.~  D


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Leaders Who Make a Difference: The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014

Leaders Who Make a Difference:  The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

There's another kind of faith in business: the belief that a product or service can radically remake an industry, change consumer habits, challenge economic assumptions. Proof for such innovative leaps is thin....Yet breakthrough progress often requires wide-eyed hope.

From the list of 50, a sampling:

1) GOOGLE
FOR BECOMING A $350 BILLION GIANT THAT LETS LOOSE ALMOST TOO MANY INNOVATIONS AND MILESTONES TO COUNT.


2) BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES
For doing good, methodically, using data to answer questions other foundations aren't asking


3) XIAOMI
FOR REINVENTING THE SMARTPHONE BUSINESS MODEL IN THE WORLD'S LARGEST MOBILE MARKET.


7) NIKE
For setting a sustainable example.


9) DONORSCHOOSE.ORG
FOR SETTING ITS SIGHTS ON EDUCATION REFORM,…avoiding unions and politicos by crowdsourcing direct assistance to teachers. 


11) DODGE
For being a part of the conversation, no matter what.


15) MICHAEL KORS
FOR WINNING TWO FASHION RACES AT ONCE

    

24) ROSE STUDIO
For reviving the art of Chinese embroidery and  craftsmanship 

    

43) BRIGHTFARMS
FOR PULLING GAS-BELCHING 18-WHEELERS OFF THE ROAD.

    

44) IROBOT
For building the bots that live among us

    
More about the 50 companies, and the full list are here.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


     

      

 

Photo via Fast Company- featuring DonorsChoose.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The top innovative companies have leaders who know how to sense and respond, as well as adapt.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 10, 9:18 AM

Fast company has a mix of what defines innovative companies that mixes old and new, connected to adaptability and flexibility.  

See the companion article on the 12 rising innovation qualities spotted in this 2014 list of companies as well as a comment comparing innovative company ranking methods to Forbes.
 ~  Deb

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From Twitter to a new kind of company with no managers, a "Holocracy"

From Twitter to a new kind of company with no managers, a "Holocracy" | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“Management perspective looks at reports as resources – like how can you get the maximum value out of this person,” Stirman says. “But when I think resources, I think like natural gas or coal mines. Thinking about a person’s life that way just seemed really dehumanizing.”


______________________

He started spending one-on-one meetings talking to his reports about their lives, instead of their tasks, and productivity shot through the roof.

______________________


Frustrated with poor results, he decided to go off script. He started spending one-on-one meetings talking to his reports about their lives, instead of their tasks, and productivity shot through the roof.
 

______________________

 

“We don’t have a hierarchy of people, we have a hierarchy of circles.”

______________________

    

“When you sit across a table from someone, ask them ‘What’s going on in your life?’ That will always remove more hurdles than asking them ‘What’s blocking you at work?’” he said.

Stirman hit another wall trying to shield his team from external drama and politics. “Classic management advice, and all my mentors told me that insulating your team from things so they won’t worry will make them more productive and happier,” he says. “But they just got angry, and confused, and disconnected. I was constantly censoring all this information and they were way happier when they knew everything.”

...“The structure is totally built around the work the company needs to achieve its purpose,” Stirman explains. “We don’t have a hierarchy of people, we have a hierarchy of circles.”


...But Medium isn’t just taking a revolutionary approach to digital publishing – it’s changing the way companies operate too. As one of the fiercest and most faithful adopters of Holacracy – a radical new theory of corporate structure – Medium is experimenting with a completely management-free environment that’s laser focused on getting things done. 


Read more: http://ow.ly/nKJBL

 


Related posts by Deb:

    
   

 

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I have to wonder why this antiquated old-school management advice is still circulating to the likes of of this younger, IT saavy crowd.  Old habits die hard.  

This detailed article cites the positive side of letting go to embrace something very new.  The leader-writer, Jason Stirman, not a manager,  discovered a diverse motivations tool that seems to work for his group, and is in for the long haul on the manager-less experiment with Holacracy.   ~  Deb



 

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Marie Jeffery's curator insight, August 10, 2013 3:02 PM

Thanks for drawing our attention to this excellent post, Deb Nystrom!

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World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors

World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

We need people who can execute ...including mastering acceleration.


Elon Musk

Recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article, Musk is compared to Steve Jobs, another visionary, and is then discussed as follows:


Elon Musks's ambitions soar even higher...


His electric-car company Tesla Motors aims to remake the way we drive, while the ultimate goal of his rocket company SpaceX, he said, is to travel to Mars and help build a self-sustaining base there.


______________________

We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through...

______________________


Skepticism?  ...each time Mr. Musk delivers a better, less-expensive electric car or launches another rocket successfully, he proves his doubters wrong.


...he co-founded a multibillion-dollar company called PayPal.


...Musk...taught himself to code and program software by the age of 12.


After ...leaving a PhD program at Stanford, Musk dedicated himself to the three important problems that would most affect the future of humanity.  "One was the internet, one was clean energy, and one was space."


All three are revolutionary spaces, and to work in all three most certainly requires an individual willing to completely reinvent himself and his expertise to change course as needed.


We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through and don't even begin to master the competency of acceleration before they are onto the next thing.


Related posts from Deb:

     



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Tesla story has elements of sensing the future that can be instructive for anyone in a change space including innovation.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:09 AM

Originally posted on my Change Leadership Watch stream, it also is highly instructive to the innovation theme, especially with the lessons of staying-the-course with the new idea and execution.  ~ Deb

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University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts

University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Conflict over governing the University of Virginia has become a proxy war in a much larger struggle over control of the nation’s public universities.


_____________________

“...these are very stressful times to be running a university,”
~ M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

_____________________

Around the country, waning state support, rising tuition and the competitive threat of online education have raised fears about the future of public universities.

Trustees and politicians in several states have increasingly flexed their muscles to influence university operations, leading to turf battles with presidents and chancellors who are largely used to having their way.


“In any sector that’s in the middle of stress and change, the relationships between C.E.O.’s and their boards gets more complicated, and these are very stressful times to be running a university,” said M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, who has held several high-level posts in business, government and academia, including president of Michigan State University and chairman of Dow Jones & Company.


He said board members who are executives in their own right are tempted, especially in challenging times, to shift from overseeing to hands-on managing.


Related posts by Deb:




Via Keith Hampson PhD (Managing Director, Client Innovations @Acrobatiq
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This seems to be another sign of the deepening malaise in higher education~ the higher education bubble. Stress at the top may reflect stress all around in higher ed.


In my own circles, there is persistent unhappiness among many I know connected to the university system.  ~ D

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Collaborate to Thrive: Dr. Dre & Luke Wood, Crowdsourced Lessons in FastCompany 2013

Collaborate to Thrive:  Dr. Dre & Luke Wood, Crowdsourced Lessons in FastCompany 2013 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Fast Company is crowdsourcing learning lessons to jump into 2013.  Dr. Dre and Luke Wood speak up about casting the right community of people quickly - [their] biggest challenge and opportunity."


Their question to leaders?   What did you learn in 2012 that you will carry forth with you into 2013?"


From ONE of their leader, crowd-sourced contributions:  

Excerpts: 


1) "You have to build the village first.  From my first 20 years ...in the music business...you could rely on a diverse portfolio of artists to create the phrenetic and improvisational energy that challenged convention and compelled the company forward.

In the consumer electronics, you have to generate that energy from the people who work at the company every day.


It requires daily focus and attention.  [We] grew from 30 to 170 this year, casting the right community of people quickly became our biggest challenge and opportunity."


2) As Beats continues to grow, we are going to search high and low to find talent that is individually smart and ambitious but collectively awe inspiring. 


Dr. Dre, President And COO, Luke Wood on "It Takes A Village."  More here.


Photo by Aqeel Hassim CC Flickr.


From curator Deb, relevant topics:  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Collaborate or die is true now, more than ever.  Technology smooths the way (YouTube world collaboration music anyone?)  

There's so much more, building on the best of individual strengths to create the extraordinary and to learn through our insides to our outsides  ~  Deb

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Which Leaders Succeed with Organizational Change?

Which Leaders Succeed with Organizational Change? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This model provides a perspective on which leaders are successful through change and which are not.   This curation stream is also about followership of change leaders.   Where have you seen this perspective in action?   ~  Deb

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Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes

Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"A great quote can provide personal inspiration and can be used to educate others. The contributor shares his top 100 leadership quotes of all time."


Excerpted (some of my own favorites taken from Kevin's list):


  • You don’t need a title to be a leader. –Multiple Attributions
  
  • A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. —John Maxwell
  
  • My own definition of leadership is this: The capacity and the will to rally men and women to a common purpose and the character which inspires confidence. —General Montgomery
  
  • Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations. —Peter Drucker
  
  • Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has. —Margaret Mead
  
  • The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is a genetic factor to leadership. That’s nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born. —Warren Bennis
  
  • To command is to serve, nothing more and nothing less. —Andre Malraux
   
  • He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander. —Aristotle


Deb:  It seems to be true, per another Scoop, that leadership, in a sense, doesn't really exist, from Peter Drucker's perspective.  It is about trust, respect, leader development opportunity, influence and community (relationship / networks / feedback.)   That's my perspective on the leadership-train-talk.


(Have a favorite quote that didn't make the list? Share it in the comments section below.)


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.


  • On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.

3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


Read about LinkedIn's new endorsement features here, via Deb's Tech Tuesday blog post:


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 11:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:25 AM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!