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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures

New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Financial and demographic woes squeeze many institutions' bottom lines. But while predictions of mergers and consolidations proliferate, so too does evidence that combining colleges -- and even close collaboration -- is hard to pull off even when it seems to make good sense.

    

A new report from the TIAA-CREF Institute endorses the thesis that many higher education institutions will need to collaborate meaningfully to function well in the future, and that some of the traditional ways of working together -- like the many successful consortia that focus on joint services -- may not work for colleges that aren't close geographically or that seek more dramatic changes in their business models.


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...institutions should aim for ...a "sweet spot" ...flexible, sweeping, ...less threatening and risky than mergers...while retaining identities to h reduce costs and [raise] capacity...

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its author, Michael K. Thomas of the New England Board of Higher Education, also concedes that mergers are "challenging terrain" on which many would-be marriages can hit potholes -- or sinkholes.

     

Instead, the report argues that more institutions should aim for what Thomas calls a "sweet spot" that is more flexible and sweeping than most consortia but less threatening and risky than mergers: strategic alliances in which they merge some of their some administrative functions (while retaining their distinct identities and structures) to both reduce costs and give them more capacity than colleges would have on their own.


Read the full article here:  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    
     
      
    


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The commentary on this piece is useful, highlighting patterns including dealing with: 1) issues of college identity, 2) alternatives to the full four years (dual credit options, community colleges, badges), and 3) entrenched administrative overhead dispassionately - as one of the fastest rising costs, as it affects careers, amidst education disruption and adaptation.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Higher Ed Management
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University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts

University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Conflict over governing the University of Virginia has become a proxy war in a much larger struggle over control of the nation’s public universities.


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“...these are very stressful times to be running a university,”
~ M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

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Around the country, waning state support, rising tuition and the competitive threat of online education have raised fears about the future of public universities.

Trustees and politicians in several states have increasingly flexed their muscles to influence university operations, leading to turf battles with presidents and chancellors who are largely used to having their way.


“In any sector that’s in the middle of stress and change, the relationships between C.E.O.’s and their boards gets more complicated, and these are very stressful times to be running a university,” said M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, who has held several high-level posts in business, government and academia, including president of Michigan State University and chairman of Dow Jones & Company.


He said board members who are executives in their own right are tempted, especially in challenging times, to shift from overseeing to hands-on managing.


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Via Keith Hampson PhD
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This seems to be another sign of the deepening malaise in higher education~ the higher education bubble. Stress at the top may reflect stress all around in higher ed.


In my own circles, there is persistent unhappiness among many I know connected to the university system.  ~ D

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