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Germany Extends Free College Education To All Students In The U.S.

Germany Extends Free College Education To All Students In The U.S. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“[Tuition fees] discourage young people who do not have a traditional academic family background from taking up study."

....[I]t was decided that from this year on, college education in the country will be free for all students. This week, as the last German state to abolish tuition fees makes its transition to free education, Germany announces that it is extending its gift of knowledge to students from the U.S. and around the world.

German universities do have a request for foreign students....a conversational fluency of German is a prerequisite for applicants coming from outside the country...[and it is] difficult...to learn the language. Fortunately, there are plenty of programs both in Germany and in the U.S. that offer courses on basic and advanced German.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Germany had free tuition before.  They experimented with allowing regions to charge tuition, and many opted to go back to the tuition free model. There are lessons to be explored here, perhaps from Americans who may choose learning German and study abroad.  

An alternative view has been published in Forbes:  ~  There is No Such Thing as a Free College Education, mentioning German culture and the taxes difference in Germany..  ~  Deb

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Nourishing state talent, a STEM education leadership & culture challenge in Colorado

Nourishing state talent, a STEM education leadership & culture challenge in Colorado | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

A new generation of education leaders aims to change what has been dubbed the “Colorado Paradox” -- the inability of the education system to generate a native population of highly-skilled and educated professionals to meet the needs of local industry."


Colorado imports most of its intellectual power. Reports indicate that Colorado has one of the highest number of college graduates per capita, yet it ranks 30th nationally in graduation rates — only 1 in 5 of its ninth-graders proceed to earn an associate or bachelor’s degree. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I have family in Colorado.  They are educated in the sciences, and they are imports.  The culture of the state may also be a factor in what happens educationally. ~  D

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TRENDS: Students Are Fleeing Liberal Arts - How It Could Hurt the U.S.

TRENDS: Students Are Fleeing Liberal Arts - How It Could Hurt the U.S. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

By Steve Yoder

 

"If there’s one thing liberal arts colleges offer, it’s critical thinking. That might be why this spring Occidental College is offering a course called Liberal Arts at the Brink? Navigating the Crisis in Higher Education.


The course examines whether college liberal arts curricula like its own can survive in a time of high unemployment and rising student debt.


______________


[Will] college liberal arts curricula l...survive in a time of high unemployment and rising student debt?

______________

 

The number of liberal arts colleges nationwide has dropped from 212 in 1990 to only 130 today, according to a study this summer in the journal Liberal Education.


The National Center for Education Statistics says the share of students matriculating with a liberal arts degree, as a percentage of all graduates, dropped slightly from 2004 to 2010 from 3 to 2.8 percent."

 

Read more at http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2013/01/09/Jilting-Liberal-Arts-Can-Hurt-the-US-to-a-Degree.aspx#iGlxHkXgrvFWy8Tf.99


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Via Jim Lerman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Are we becoming "job" driven or are we becoming an economy of individuals?  It may another signal of the dawn of the freelance and electronic/independents economy, which may also mean we either self-fund and study what we want to study, curriculum or not.  ~ Deb

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Robin Martin's comment, March 9, 2013 5:41 PM
Thanks again Deb!
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The Scary Economics Of Higher Education - Forbes

The Scary Economics Of Higher Education - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Universities could wind up in the same fix as their students: Too much debt, not enough income to pay it back.

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In my own neck of town, there are so many new buildings at the big University, I have lost count.  Now Moody's is talking about what we've already known:  "Every university funding source is under pressure, Moody’s asserts, meaning that all institutions -- even the elites -- need to rethink their business models."   ~  Deb

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 17, 2013 10:55 AM

"At the corner of Fifth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan, you can see higher education’s ambitions reaching to the sky. The New School’s 16-story University Center nears completion at a cost of $353 million.


The edifice is impressive. But would you want to hold the mortgage on it? That’s what you have, in effect, if you buy a tax-exempt bond from the New School. Before you invest in debt backed by an educational institution, think about the precarious state of this sector of the economy."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s comment, January 17, 2013 12:28 PM
That's what this quarter's MOOC is about.
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Youth and Optimism: Emotional Intelligence foundation skills for the Future of Change Resiliency

Youth and Optimism: Emotional Intelligence foundation skills for the Future of Change Resiliency | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Introducing students as young as 13 to the principles of EI can have an significant impact on behaviour and academic performance.  The benefits only increase as the students mature towards school leaving age."


This HR article captures the systemic nature of our education system and the need for long term thinking, especially with the decline of creativity in the U.S.


Excerpts:


Dr Martin Seligman of the University of Pennsylvania found that scores on a test of optimism in 500 UPENN freshmen were a better predictor of actual grades during their first year than SAT scores or high school grades.


...There is no doubt that by measuring and developing key emotional elements such as self-awareness, empathy, adaptability, relationship skills and optimism (none of which you will find on the curriculum of most schools today!) [improves] our predictions around which students will succeed and which may need more support.


...we can actually improve academic results and, even more importantly, prepare our young people better for higher education or the workplace.

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Compensation Bloat? University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter

Compensation Bloat?  University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

An open letter to University of Michigan's Board of Regents from about a dozen of the school's faculty criticizes the school's administrative pay and bonus system. "The University is in desperate and urgent need of fiscal reform." 


____________________
   
The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements...some administrators received...in excess of $50,000.

     

____________________


The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements, and that they are an unwise use of money from the general fund. Data obtained by the professors show that some administrators received salary supplements in excess of $50,000.

  

...Anthony Mora, a history professor who helped author the letter, said that while it's reasonable executive officers have higher compensation that most staff, U-M's compensation rates for those officers are between 27 and 41 percent higher than the rates' of administrators at peer institutions such as Berkeley, Texas and Virginia, according to a review done by the faculty.
 

"We want to have an open and candid discussion about the university's resources," Mora said. "I don't see this as an effort to be adversarial with the administration. I think people in the administration are genuine when they say they care about the university. But I do think there's an opportunity here for the faculty and the administration to work together."

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Several faculty have taken up the gauntlet to question escalating costs - starting with higher education administrative bonuses.  Executive bonuses may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these, perhaps prompted by the poorly planned, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  which, incidentally, did NOT include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning.


It also involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices, and perhaps stepping higher education back to a bigger picture of where the value generation resides and how it needs to be valued today.   ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 3:59 PM

The escalating costs of higher education may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these from the core of  the university system, the faculty.

The article also referenced the initially poorly implemented, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  that did not include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning and involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices.   ~  Deb


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University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts

University of Virginia Crisis Reflects Wider Leadership Conflicts | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Conflict over governing the University of Virginia has become a proxy war in a much larger struggle over control of the nation’s public universities.


_____________________

“...these are very stressful times to be running a university,”
~ M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

_____________________

Around the country, waning state support, rising tuition and the competitive threat of online education have raised fears about the future of public universities.

Trustees and politicians in several states have increasingly flexed their muscles to influence university operations, leading to turf battles with presidents and chancellors who are largely used to having their way.


“In any sector that’s in the middle of stress and change, the relationships between C.E.O.’s and their boards gets more complicated, and these are very stressful times to be running a university,” said M. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, who has held several high-level posts in business, government and academia, including president of Michigan State University and chairman of Dow Jones & Company.


He said board members who are executives in their own right are tempted, especially in challenging times, to shift from overseeing to hands-on managing.


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Via Keith Hampson PhD
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This seems to be another sign of the deepening malaise in higher education~ the higher education bubble. Stress at the top may reflect stress all around in higher ed.


In my own circles, there is persistent unhappiness among many I know connected to the university system.  ~ D

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, this fits what I've been tracking since I left higher education in 2009, and his track record of sensing disruption is impressive.  


Who is responding in ways that make sense?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:50 AM

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Trend Disruptions: 5 Funded Tech Companies Set to Impact 2013 Higher Ed

Trend Disruptions: 5 Funded Tech Companies Set to Impact  2013 Higher Ed | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"It's a great time to be in education technology industry: venture capitalists have dropped a whopping $1.37 billion into the industry since 2011. That's a lot of cash &  opportunitiy to seriously change the way we do education."

  

Here are excerpts of the five profiled:

 

1. 2U   ~ The first startup of its kind to partner with top universities to offer full degree programs entirely on the Web.  

    

  • Founded in 2008, they've raised an impressive $97 million in venture funding, positioning it as a key leader in the ed tech industry.

   
2. EdSurge     The company recently nabbed $400,000 in seed funding from investors including the Washington Post, and it's backed by finances from the Bill and Melina Gates Foundation.

      

  • Launched in 2011, EdSurge was founded by veteran journalists and education technology professionals.

   

3. Echo360     Boasting $31 million in startup funding, Echo360 offers online and mobile tools for blended learning.  

         

  • Echo360 snagged $450 million to fund an initiative to reach 50 percent of U.S. college students in the next five years. The company also recently acquired ed-tech startup LectureTools Inc., its first public acquisition.

   

4. Noodle   Think big education searh:  Noodle has developed the most comprehensive, age-ubiquitous online search engine dedicated solely to educational topics. 

   

  • Founded in 2010 by the creator of the Princeton Review and 2U, the site features over 170,000 education providers and has received millions in funding. 

   

5. Always Prepped     In beta, Always Prepped provides online tools to help manage student and classroom data, providing a single stream of imported data for teachers to analyze their students or classes.

   

  • They've  raised an impressive $650,000 in startup funding.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The five start-ups listed are well funded and may be seriously on-fire within the year or two ahead.  

Time will tell, as the focus on lecture style and learning (competency building) and all the admin that goes with it begins to trade places.

 ~ Deb

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Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration

Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"'Innovation campuses' are springing up everywhere" especially in the Midwest.

 

...the intentional cohabitation of academics and industry is key to all of them, something university leaders say made the ambitious and expensive projects palatable to legislators and voters even as the economy and higher ed appropriations shrunk.

 

Here's sampling of what is under contruction, via Inside Higher Ed:

 

...many [are] in the Midwest and almost all involving fancy new buildings and partnerships between public colleges and private corporations.

 

Public research universities have long had ties to state industries, and technology transfer is widespread in higher education.


The new innovation campuses include:

  • Kansas State University’s Olathe Innovation Campus, which was funded with a county sales tax and built on land donated by a municipality in the Kansas City suburbs.
  • across the state line sits Missouri Innovation Campus, which is being built by the University of Central Missouri and has the enthusiastic support of Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.
  • Nebraska Innovation Campus is under construction on the former state fairgrounds in Lincoln.
  • One state away is South Dakota State University’s Innovation Campus.
  • In Ohio, there’s Akron Innovation Campus.
  • Even the Aussies are getting in on the fun. The University of Wollongong is home to its own Innovation Campus.

 


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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