Change Leadership Watch
15.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Change Leadership Watch
How change happens and who is leading it.  For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

People Over Profit: Why Two Small Countries Stood Up to Big Mining, And the Fight Continues

People Over Profit: Why Two Small Countries Stood Up to Big Mining, And the Fight Continues | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

If the governments of Costa Rica and El Salvador can resist the mining industry, maybe we all can, but not without a fight:  Mining firms are suing governments for policies that impeded future profits.   


______________________
   
.....global mining companies are trying to ensure that no government is allowed to say no.

 ______________________
   


One is the tiny nation of El Salvador, where the government stopped issuing gold mining permits half a decade ago. The Salvadoran government did so despite sky-high gold prices and the argument that exporting gold was one of the country's few chances to boost aggregate economic growth (in the short-term, at least).
      

They did so largely because the majority of Salvadorans get water from one large river system, and gold mining invariably pollutes nearby rivers and watersheds.    ...El Salvador is not alone in its policies. The government of Costa Rica has said no to open-pit mining. (While open-pit mining is only one method of mining, it is among the most environmentally destructive.)
     
Costa Rica's Congress subsequently voted for a no-new-open-pit-mining law—unanimously. That no was upheld by Costa Rica's Supreme Court.
    

Governments can say no to a false notion of development that would do little besides line the pockets of elite corporate interests, while leaving devastated ecosystems in its wake.   ....But global mining companies are trying to ensure that no government is allowed to say no.
     

These corporations are making their cases based on a controversial Central America "free trade" agreement with the United States, and on El Salvador's former investment law (written with the help of the World Bank), which opened the door for mining firms to sue governments for policies that impeded future profits.   
   
In February 2014, Infinito announced that, rather than accept the Supreme Court rejection of its appeal, it was filing an investor-state case against the Costa Rican government at the World Bank's ICSID. Infinito is suing Costa Rica for the $94 million it claims to have invested so far.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a cautionary tale of profiteering and corporatism at the global level.  The author suggests we support the right of governments to say no to rapacious mining.  It may be there are many other type of global actions that can destroy the environment in other nations when putting profits above people.   Just passing along this awareness can make a difference.  ~  Deb 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Why GM’s Mary Barra Got the CEO Job

Why GM’s Mary Barra Got the CEO Job | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Barra will become GM’s fifth CEO in less than five years. She now has the opportunity to prove that a GM-lifer can indeed force radical and lasting changes at the automaker. If she can push departments to revamp and think progressively, she will surely be labeled as a transformational CEO.

She has experience in every facet of the organization including European operations and successful product launches including the Cadillac ATS, CTS, and Chevrolet’s Stingray and Malibu.

Automotive sales are continuing to rebound and hit levels that we haven’t seen since 2007 but competition is stiff. Product is king and Barra’s latest post proves she has the chops to propel GM forward.


Related posts & tools by Deb:



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How will it work out for a new leader?   Time will tell, quickly, if JCPenny is any indication.  A gender-less look at revamping a hide-bound traditional organization could be useful.  GM was the learning lab for the legendary late Peter Drucker.  He knew was was and wasn't working in multi-national corporations back in the day.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Insourcing at GE: The Real Story of Process, Change, Culture and Profit

Insourcing at GE: The Real Story of Process, Change, Culture and Profit | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"The focus has been on jobs coming back. It's really a process and a culture story."

GE Appliances is proving once again that the balance of process and people, aligned with a clearly articulated and understood purpose and vision, is the source of improved performance and capability development. With leadership engagement and support, this system will thrive


Excerpted:


  • There was a fishbone diagram of the production flow
  • A cardboard mockup of the factory layout which also showed how the equipment would look.
  • At 7:45 a.m. each day leaders met, then at 8:00 a.m. everyone met to review the prior day, and what they would do that day.
  • Then at 4:15 p.m. everyone met again to review what they'd done.


The water heater that resulted was a new design, with better performance: 20% fewer parts and 50% less labor.


Inventory was reduced 60%, labor efficiency improved 30%, time-to-produce was reduced 68%, and space required for the line came down by 80%.


The development team was extremely cohesive. But the problem was, the culture needed to change outside the "Big Room" and very few cultural change efforts had been made since 1994.

As the leadership began to introduce a new way of working together it had to solidify trust in the workforce and instill a level of confidence that continuous improvement was not just another initiative that would pass. This would be a journey.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The insourcing story of GE is actually a process & culture change story, which is how it comes to be shared here on Change Leadership Watch.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Signs of Changes Taking Hold in Electronics Factories in China

Signs of Changes Taking Hold in Electronics Factories in China | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
After the hardships of workers in China’s electronics factories were exposed to a global audience, working conditions have changed.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

After FoxConn & Apple made front page news and were parodied for their treatment of workers, there is now a shift globally in investment for staff.  The bottom line and social resposibility have gone global. ~ D

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Leaders Who Make a Difference: The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014

Leaders Who Make a Difference:  The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

There's another kind of faith in business: the belief that a product or service can radically remake an industry, change consumer habits, challenge economic assumptions. Proof for such innovative leaps is thin....Yet breakthrough progress often requires wide-eyed hope.

From the list of 50, a sampling:

1) GOOGLE
FOR BECOMING A $350 BILLION GIANT THAT LETS LOOSE ALMOST TOO MANY INNOVATIONS AND MILESTONES TO COUNT.


2) BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES
For doing good, methodically, using data to answer questions other foundations aren't asking


3) XIAOMI
FOR REINVENTING THE SMARTPHONE BUSINESS MODEL IN THE WORLD'S LARGEST MOBILE MARKET.


7) NIKE
For setting a sustainable example.


9) DONORSCHOOSE.ORG
FOR SETTING ITS SIGHTS ON EDUCATION REFORM,…avoiding unions and politicos by crowdsourcing direct assistance to teachers. 


11) DODGE
For being a part of the conversation, no matter what.


15) MICHAEL KORS
FOR WINNING TWO FASHION RACES AT ONCE

    

24) ROSE STUDIO
For reviving the art of Chinese embroidery and  craftsmanship 

    

43) BRIGHTFARMS
FOR PULLING GAS-BELCHING 18-WHEELERS OFF THE ROAD.

    

44) IROBOT
For building the bots that live among us

    
More about the 50 companies, and the full list are here.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


     

      

 

Photo via Fast Company- featuring DonorsChoose.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The top innovative companies have leaders who know how to sense and respond, as well as adapt.  ~  D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:18 AM

Fast company has a mix of what defines innovative companies that mixes old and new, connected to adaptability and flexibility.  

See the companion article on the 12 rising innovation qualities spotted in this 2014 list of companies as well as a comment comparing innovative company ranking methods to Forbes.
 ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Revealed – the 147 Companies That Run the World | Forbes & New Scientist

Revealed – the 147 Companies That Run the World  |  Forbes & New Scientist | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.


The study's assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable.
 

The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York's Occupy Wall Street movement, ...but the study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power. It combines the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world's transnational corporations (TNCs).

_________________________

"If connectedness clusters, so does wealth, ...
money flows towards the most highly connected members." ~ Dan Braha of NECSI

_________________________

 

"Reality is so complex, we must move away from dogma, whether it's conspiracy theories or free-market," says James Glattfelder. "Our analysis is reality-based."

From the Forbes summary version of this post:


... the data set...excludes GSEs and privately-held companies and is dominated by banks, institutional investors and mutual funds that don’t always have much in the way of control over assets.


Forbes reader danogden ...commented: “…pension plans, corporate 401(k) plans and individual funds..manage trillions in assets ultimately belonging to individuals who are predominantly not in the “1%”. …


...“custodian banks” in the list — companies who hold the assets of asset managers to ensure timely processing of things ...do not own the assets, or even really control [them.] A better list would be the actual asset OWNERS, rather than the vendors who manage, house and clear said assets.”


 If connectedness clusters, so does wealth, says Dan Braha of NECSI: in similar models, money flows towards the most highly connected members. 


...The real question, says the Zurich team, is whether it can exert concerted political power. Driffill feels 147 is too many to sustain collusion. Braha suspects they will compete in the market but act together on common interests. Resisting changes to the network structure may be one such common interest.


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Complexity science is a window to understanding nature as well as ourselves in a global system.  This article is blend of two, from the original New Scientist post from 2011, and from a Forbes summary that was listed on LinkedIn today, September 2013.  ~  Deb

more...
Jim Allen, III's curator insight, September 13, 2013 10:26 AM

They didn't dig deep enough into who heads, runs, and holds most interest in these companies and the number will be closer to 12 families.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

When Food Isn't the Answer to Hunger

When Food Isn't the Answer to Hunger | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
The Obama Administration’s proposal to change an outdated food aid restriction would allow the United States to feed millions more people at the same cost.

   

________________________

...By strengthening and not undercutting local farmers, cash aid also helps countries to avoid hunger later.

________________________


   

Excerpts:

In many places, people go hungry because there is no food. But in a lot of places, food is available and the market is working — people are just too poor to buy it. In those places, giving individuals or charitable groups cash to buy food can make food aid cheaper, faster and fairer. By strengthening and not undercutting local farmers, cash aid also helps countries to avoid hunger later.


   

________________________

...giving individuals or groups cash to buy food can make food aid cheaper, faster and fairer....the United States, the largest donor, is still tied to sending [food]...

________________________



With the exception of one country, every major supplier of humanitarian food aid enjoys the flexibility to use whatever form of aid works best — they can send food, buy food in the affected region, or just provide cash or vouchers. But the United States, the largest donor, is still tied to sending sacks of grain and legumes from America. Only 15 percent of American humanitarian food aid can be untied — bought outside the United States.


Now the Obama administration proposes giving America more flexibility. In the 2014 budget it just submitted to Congress, it is upping the untied amount from 15 percent to 45 percent.


The proposal also modernizes food aid by ending a second great inefficiency: a process known as monetization. And it is planning to ask American companies to provide not just commodities but also super-nutritious foods for the severely malnourished — in general modernizing food aid.


Read the full article here, including the problem in Haiti - why our food donations are disrupting their ability to recover.


Photo:  By Feed My Starving Children (FMSC), Flickr

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Smart intervention into the food, market & hunger system seems to be the answer.  The US system of subsidy seems to be part of the problem, especially for Haiti and other very poor countries.  ~  D

more...
Robin Martin's comment, May 18, 2013 10:57 AM
Thanks for sharing Deb...I'm rescooping this one to "leadership." I guess I need the premium version of Scoop.it so I can create more topics!! ; )
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Shih's POV: American Competitiveness & Innovation is rooted in US-Based Manufacturing

Shih's POV: American Competitiveness & Innovation is rooted in US-Based Manufacturing | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Having a strong domestic manufacturing base is vital to the United States maintaining its world leadership in innovation.


I've heard people in Michigan and Ohio talk about the need to reclaim US based manufacturing.  Seeing and experiencing the impact of GM, Ford and Chrysler on the systemic health of the US economy, and the moderation of hubris in these organization, is convincing, as is Willy Shih's essay.  Manufacturing is also quite different than it was in the 50s.


GM's Akerson also has a bit to say about the politized nature of the car industry's recovery.  It's helpful to review his perspective.   


Excerpted from Willy Shih's blog:


Manufacturing provides the foundation for many kinds of innovations. If manufacturing processes are immature or the know-how needed to develop the product or process to produce the product is tacit and not well codified, you cannot innovate in a country if the factories are on the other side of the world.


R&D and manufacturing must be located close to each other so their people can together figure out how to develop a product that can be manufactured at a cost and level of quality that will make it a commercial success.


Source:  Willy C. Shih is a professor of management practice at Harvard Business School. Prior to joining HBS, he spent 28 years in the IT and consumer electronics industry, where he worked as an executive at Thomson, Kodak, IBM, Digital Equipment, and Silicon Graphics.

more...
No comment yet.