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Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week

Change in the Nature of Work: The Case For "Antiwork" and the 20 hour Work Week | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Does a 40+ hours a week actually work for today's and tomorrow's world?  Consider what would happen if we had a 20+ hour work week as the new standard?


________________
   
Society seems to be in denial over this...  ~ Brian Dean

________________


Excerpted:

U.K.-based writer Brian Dean argues that we need to reframe the idea of work itself—and maybe replace it with "antiwork" instead. He explains:
 

"Antiwork is a moral alternative to the obsession with "jobs" that has plagued our society for too long. It’s a project to radically reframe work and leisure. It’s also a cognitive antidote to the pernicious culture of "hard work," which has taken over our minds as well as our precious time."

________________

    

"The global economic collapse wasn’t caused by human idleness, and neither were the previous recessions." 

   

________________


Twenty years ago, Jeremy Rifkin estimated that about 75% of jobs in industrialized countries included tasks that could be at least partially automated, and as artificial intelligence and engineering improves, that number keeps getting higher.


"Society seems to be in denial over this, to a large extent," Dean says.

"So, we see the persistent belief that we can achieve 'full employment.' Rifkin showed empirically that this is nonsense, unless we create a lot of make-work, i.e., work for the sake of working. And that’s what, as a society, we seem to be doing. Everywhere you look there are stupid, pointless (and probably environmentally destructive) jobs."
 

If we don't work, how will we pay rent?  Dean supports the idea of unconditional basic income—a system in which society pays everyone enough to meet basic needs, so we can all spend our time doing something that truly fulfills us.

   

Related change posts by Deb on Reveln:
    

       

 

Deb's related ScoopIt streams:

    

    

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

So the 20-30 hour work week rises again.  Frithjof Bergman, at the University of Michigan,  suggested it for society decades ago.  Perhaps now with the pain of income disparity, the speed of technological advances including communication, it can be taken more seriously.

Excerpted from the interview referenced below:  

Frithjof:   New Work represents the effort to redirect the use of technology so that it isn’t used simply to speed up the work and in the process ruin the world – turning rivers into sewers and rain into acid.
     

The purpose of technology should be to reduce the oppressive, spirit-breaking, dementing power of work – to use machines to do the work that is boring and repetitive. Then human beings can do the creative, imaginative, uplifting work.
      

So New Work is simply the attempt to allow people, for at least some of their time, to do something they passionately want to do, something they deeply believe in.   ~ Deb

   

Reference:  http://www.context.org/iclib/ic37/bergmann/

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Transform from Industrial Age Design: BetaCodex - Turn Your Company Outside-In!

How to build a devolved cell structured organization and leave the old, slow and bureaucratic structures behind.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

                

          

     

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Beta Codex network has the thinking and design that will help us finally leave old command and control structures, individualistic thinking behind.  Scientific management had its day, back in the 1950's in wide open economic markets.  In competitive, global, digitally powered, high speed markets, hierarchy is so last century.   It's time to change to agile, cellular design that is as adaptable as the next mobile phone operating system.  ~  Deb 

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Taking the Bet: Dan Gilbert’s Investment Gamble on Downtown Detroit

Taking the Bet:  Dan Gilbert’s Investment Gamble on Downtown Detroit | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Against tall odds, Dan Gilbert, the Quicken Loans chairman, is putting down money to revive a two-square-mile area that was once Detroit’s core.


...His plans, according to academics like Brent D. Ryan, author of “Design After Decline: How America Rebuilds Shrinking Cities,” amount to one of the most ambitious privately financed urban reclamation projects in American history.


Opportunity Detroit, as Mr. Gilbert has branded it, is both a rescue mission and a business venture....   When he started buying in 2011, the city was having what he has described as a “skyscraper sale.”

Related posts by Deb:

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've covered some of Dan's Gilbert's 2011 intentions about downtown Detroit at FutureMidwest, 2011, a photo essay here.   Our cities could be the Amazon rain-forests are to the earth, regulating our air, our weather, our ocean health, as well as our own economic & community future shared with the region and state.  

What I shared on twitter as I listened to Dan Gilbert at FutureMidwest 2011:

  • 25 Things I Learned in 25 Years of Business by Dan Gilbert @quickenloans: #5 Building anything great is messy.  ~  D
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Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

______________________


...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

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...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

______________________

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

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In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


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Why Traditional Business Transformation Doesn't Work: Co-Creative Transformation | Innovation Playground

Why Traditional Business Transformation Doesn't Work: Co-Creative Transformation  | Innovation Playground | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Over 60% of companies out there are operating on a dated buisness model and 20% operating with a mental model that had expired for more than 5 years ago.


Business transformation traditionally takes the form of unfreezing to refreezing and briding the gaps in capabilities, mindset and performance.  This classic change model was ok for the olden days; it's too rigid to work now (unless we classify it as a slushie!)


The transformation model featured in this blog post by Idris Mootee has a strong future orientation, uses design thinking principles, and features a tangible, collaborative co-creation process.


A high-level view is captured by the following formula: Successful Brand-Driven Business Transformation = P+N+C+M+I+F


P = Develop a perspective of the future(s) informed by strategic foresights (both customer and technology contexts) and deep organizational insights;


N = Develop a co-created brand narrative that inspired people re: possibilities and purpose at the core of the story;


C = Develop a compelling case for the need for change developed and shared by all executives, investors, employees and B2B business partners;


M = Map - Develop a practical means to tie innovation (roadmap) and projects to the desired future(s);


I = Design an incentive systems that are aligned to identify and encourage appropriate behaviors compatible with the desired future;


F = Develop feedback mechanism for each stage of the process to monitor progress and provide input for continuous improvement.

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It’s a beautiful time to be alive, educated and entrepreneurial

It’s a beautiful time to be alive, educated and entrepreneurial | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

I grew up watching Star Trek, ...believing t...we would all be using communicators, replicators, tricorders, and transporters. I was optimistic...

    

...I was disappointed. I grew up into a world filled with hunger, poverty, and disease—....a world .... in which people obsess over maximizing their share of the pie. There is a greater focus on building wealth than on bettering the world.

      

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...
This period in human history is unique, because now entrepreneurs can do what only governments and big corporations could do before. 

   

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No wonder so many MBA students want to join investment banks: it is the best way to reap big financial rewards and to get ahead.   ...I’m an MBA myself, so I can be critical about MBAs. I too worked at an investment bank, ...I too used to obsess over building wealth, and didn’t believe I could really make a difference in the world. 

         

...I am here to tell you that you have opportunities that I could not even have imagined when I was young. You can build the Star Trek future that we have dreamed about. 

      

...This period in human history is unique, because now entrepreneurs can do what only governments and big corporations could do before. You are the space cadets with the opportunities to make amazing things happen.



_____________________

    
We need people who care about enriching humanity rather than just themselves. 

_____________________

    


....Whatever you do, don’t take a mindless, meaningless job with a big company just because they offer you a big salary. Try to be somewhere where you can constantly redefine yourself and keep learning. That is what it is going to be about: constant learning and reinvention.

      

The future is going to be what we make it. It can be the Star Trek utopia or a Mad Max wreck, a creative playground or an Orwellian nightmare. That is why we need people with good values and ethics leading the way.  We need people who care about enriching humanity rather than just themselves. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This gem of a commencement address is well worth a slow, careful reading.  Vivek Wadhwa delivered this address this year at Hult International Business School. It is informative to us all, not just his audience this past summer at the school formerly known as  the Arthur D. Little School of Management.  Click on the photo or title to review the well-researched, technology savvy, compassionate and practical view of what's coming, affecting our families, including changes in livelihood.   I like how the author encourages us to choose other options than just corporate jobs for the big bucks. 


Who is he?

 His bio, from his website is as follows:

Vivek Wadhwa is a Fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; Director of Research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at the Pratt School of Engineering,  Duke University; and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University. He is author of  “The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent”—which was named by The Economist as a Book of the Year of 2012, and ” Innovating Women: The Changing Face of Technology”—which documents the struggles and triumphs of women.  He was named by Foreign Policy Magazine as Top 100 Global Thinker in 2012. In 2013, TIME Magazine listed him as one of The 40 Most Influential Minds in Tech.  

    

 ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, October 17, 2014 9:46 PM

I've shared this gem of a commencement address by Vivek Wadhwa on Change Leadership Watch as well as here.  He delivered this address at Hult International Business School. It is informative to us all, not just his audience this past summer at the school formerly known as  the Arthur D. Little School of Management.  Click on the photo or title to review the well-researched, technology savvy, compassionate and practical view of what's coming, affecting our families, including changes in livelihood.   I like how the author encourages us to choose other options than just corporate jobs for the big bucks. 

    

Who is he?    His bio, from his website is as follows:
    
Vivek Wadhwa is a Fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance, Stanford University; Director of Research at the Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization at the Pratt School of Engineering,  Duke University; and Distinguished Fellow at Singularity University. He is author of  “The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent”—which was named by The Economist as a Book of the Year of 2012, and ” Innovating Women: The Changing Face of Technology”—which documents the struggles and triumphs of women.  He was named by Foreign Policy Magazine as Top 100 Global Thinker in 2012. In 2013, TIME Magazine listed him as one of The 40 Most Influential Minds in Tech. 

     

 ~  Deb

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Toyota's Relational Contracts and the Decline of General Motors — HBS Working Knowledge

Toyota's Relational Contracts and the Decline of General Motors — HBS Working Knowledge | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
What led to General Motors' decline? Long regarded as one of the best managed and most successful firms in the world, its share of the US market fell from 62.6 to 19.8 percent between 1980 and 2009, and in 2009 the firm went bankrupt.


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Toyota's practices were rooted in ...effective relational contracts-- ...based on subjective measures of performance ...enforced by the shadow of the future. 

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The authors argue that the conventional explanations for GM's decline are seriously incomplete...and make the case that one of the reasons that GM began to struggle was because rival Toyota's practices were rooted in the widespread deployment of effective relational contracts-- agreements based on subjective measures of performance that could neither be fully specified beforehand nor verified after the fact and that were thus enforced by the shadow of the future.

GM's history, organizational structure, and managerial practices made it very difficult to maintain these kinds of agreements either within the firm or between the firm and its suppliers.

...Two aspects of GM's experience seem common to a wide range of firms.

First, past success often led to extended periods of denial: Indeed a pattern of denial following extended success appears to be a worldwide phenomenon.

Second, many large American manufacturers had difficulty adopting the bundle of practices pioneered by firms like Toyota. 
   
See a companion piece, also referencing GM in Deb's comments in Change Management Resources ScoopIt newsletter:  

Moving Beyond Hierarchy - What is Working Now to Lead Through Change?

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Denial of change after a long success, and failure to adapt to the new?  The cited Harvard working paper by Susan Helper and Rebecca Henderson gives implications of GM's history in looking at efforts to revive American manufacturing.   

It may not be news, yet it may be a good reminder to anyone under 50 employed by a legacy company like GM based on years of success, followed by decline.  


By the way, I'll be presenting with Ron Koller at the Michigan Labor Management Association conference on April 10, 2014 

Michigan: What’s in it for Me? “Why WE Makes Sense”
The Michigan Labor Management Association (MLMA) Partners in Progress Conference
Kellogg Conference Center

More information is here on my speaking events page.  


~  Deb    
 

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Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030

Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

2 billion jobs disappearing (approx. 50% of the world's jobs) it was intended as a wakeup call about how quickly things are about to change.  Academia ~ the battle ahead will be taking place at YOUR doorstep.


A search for comments on The End of Work: The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the Post-Market Era, a non-fiction book by American economist Jeremy Rifkin reminded me of Bob Johansen, Futurist and also led me to another Futurist, Thomas Frey.


Here are excerpts from Frey's TEDx talk:


The article includes a brief overview of five (5) industries – where the jobs will be going away and the jobs that will likely replace at least some of them – over the coming decades.


1) Power Industry


Jobs Going Away

  • Power generation plants will begin to close down.
  • Coal plants will begin to close down.
  • Many railroad and transportation workers will no longer be needed.
  • Even wind farms, natural gas, and bio-fuel generators will begin to close down.
  • Ethanol plants will be phased out or repurposed.
  • Utility company engineers, gone.
  • Line repairmen, gone.


New Jobs Created

  • Manufacturing power generation units the size of ac units will go into full production.
  • Installation crews will begin to work around the clock.
  • The entire national grid will need to be taken down (a 20 year project). Much of it will be recycled and the recycling process alone will employ many thousands of people.
  • Micro-grid operations will open in every community requiring a new breed of engineers, managers, and regulators.
   

2) Automobile Transportation – Going Driverless

  

Over the next 10 years we will see the first wave of autonomous vehicles hit the roads, with some of the first inroads made by vehicles that deliver packages, groceries, and fast-mail envelopes.

    

3) Education

  • ...courses are becoming a commodity. Teachers only need to teach once, record it, and then move on to another topic or something else.
  • ...we are transitioning from a teaching model to a learning model. Why do we need to wait for a teacher to take the stage in the front of the room when we can learn whatever is of interest to us at any moment?

   

Teaching requires experts. Learning only requires coaches.

   

Jobs Going Away

  • Teachers.
  • Trainers.
  • Professors.

  

New Jobs Created

  • Coaches.
  • Course designers.
  • Learning camps
   
4) 3D Printers

Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands of items and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did during the Henry Ford era.

   
5) Bots

We are moving quickly past the robotic vacuum cleaner stage to far more complex machines.

   
Read more, Thomas Frey - Futurist Speaker (http://s.tt/1imN0)


Read about Deb's perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing via a recent blog posts here (key word search-able.)



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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, October 7, 2012 12:19 AM
The worst is yet to come. Hopefully,we will still survive with this prediction. Indeed, the inventions of human beings are not totally beneficial to human beings. It is amazing, but sad to consider....
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, October 7, 2012 9:36 PM
@Victoria, we will adapt, but we will not ALL adapt. Hopefully education in some areas will catch up sooner, rather than later, to help us make the changes we need, learning the skills at the right time.
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Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "


Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  


Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.


__________________________


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________


Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:


"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.


According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.


In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”


As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:


1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)


2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)


Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.


To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA