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Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It takes courage to listen. Whether it’s a first or fifth transition to a new leader role, these non-profit leadership lessons learned are timeless. Pause, reflect. choose, (from horse-guided leadership & learning.) In the first months, resist the urgent and not important to follow these practical steps to ensure your success.  

______________________
It takes courage to listen & learn, as a new leader.
_______________________

 

What I learned at the University of Michigan early on was the power of the conversation. Listening builds relationship. Listening well has impact as a leader with groups of new direct reports, with peers and colleagues, ALL of them await a new leader’s first steps and actions. Each. Encounter. Equals. Opportunity. To. Connect.

John Taylor, CEO of the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) had this to say about the series:
 

“As a new CEO, the article’s main points to invest time in learning, building relationships, and establishing priorities have been key during my first six months on the job.”  
 

I interviewed John before he left his role at the University of Michigan. His view is a fresh insight to help this year's new leaders.  Note that although we make reference to associations throughout the posts, these tips apply to any non-profit organization and are adaptable to the for-profit sector as well.

EXCERPTS from the full article derived from
  -- "Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job"

1. LISTEN to Learn

In many high-pressure environments, deep listening distinguishes the highly experienced from the amateurs. ...One association executive advised his peers to “resist the temptation to prove how bright you are; do nothing when you first arrive—just learn.”
   

...Develop a list for listening interviews including staff, board members, active volunteers, randomly selected members, dropped members, industry leaders, subject matter experts, external partners, and others. Everyone has something to say; they ...will be encouraged by your desire to learn. Ask open-ended questions. Prepare to be surprised. Though many relationships will deepen during your tenure, early conversations can provide unique opportunities for candid exchanges unencumbered by baggage, fears, or agendas.

 

2. COMMUNICATE!

...Information for your staff is usually under-communicated by a factor of four.
 

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Staff members are vitally interested in what the boss [senior leadership team, executive committee, board] just talked about. Find a way to share it regularly.

    

  • The board should be vitally interested in progress toward strategic goals. Find a way to check on this.
   
  • Committees and other volunteer groups don’t know what other committees and groups are doing. Summarize, align, and share.
   
  • Members and constituents want to know “What’s in it for me?”  They will appreciate understanding the logic behind board decisions. Find a way to test, confirm and communicate this regularly. 
Read the full post on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/courage-new-leaders-listen-learn-year-deb-nystrom 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article is useful for any non-profit leader in interim roles, as well as new leadership roles.  It's drawn from my work with new, on-boarding leaders in a large, complex, world-class non-profit, the University of Michigan, and my continuing work for my own company,REVELN Consulting, co-written with my colleagues, senior partners at Ideas for Action, LLCAlan Davis, my former client and friend, Jolene Knapp, who are both talented, highly experienced non-profit CEO's and leaders. I'm pleased to be sharing with you ourSeven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job".

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Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
He made the stunning announcement on Tuesday during a press conference.


Blatter has been under fire since last week, when indictments for 14 people, including members of the FIFA executive committee, were handed out by the U.S. Department of Justice for charges of racketeering, money laundering, and bribery.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Including the previous post on the need to step back and pivot FIFA into a new era, this provides fresh opportunity to fix what's been broken for a long time.  The challenge is great, the rewards could also be great if successful change happens at all levels. ~  Deb

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Failure as Strength - The power of Failure for Innovation & Learning from Defeat

Failure as Strength - The power of Failure for Innovation & Learning from Defeat | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It’s really hard to talk about failure. The "Admitting Failure" website, connected to engineering failure stories at its creation, hopes to change that. 

_____________________
   
...acknowledging failure is often a catalyst for innovation... 
_____________________

    

It is painful for civil society organizations to acknowledge when we don’t meet our goals and objectives...   The paradox is that we do everything we can to avoid these pains even though we all know failure is the best teacher and we have to be open and talk about our failures in order to learn. ....acknowledging failure is often a catalyst for innovation that takes our work from good to great.
    

To address this conundrum we need a paradigm shift in how civil society views failure.  We think this starts with open and honest dialogue about what is working and what isn’t so Admitting Failure exists to support and encourage organizations to (not surprisingly) admit failure.
 

ad·mit   /ədˈmit/
verb: 
1. To concede as true or valid <admit responsibility for a failure>
2. To allow entry <admit failure into the organization, allowing a safe space for dialogue>
 

Fear, embarrassment, and intolerance of failure drives our learning underground and hinders innovation.
    
No more. Failure is strength. The most effective and innovative organizations are those that are willing to speak openly about their failures because the only truly “bad” failure is one that’s repeated.
   
Related posts by Deb on Learning and Failure:
   

   
   
    

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

"To begin again, this time more intelligently" is exactly why embracing failure is important to building high performing teams and to high performance cultures that truly support learning, adaptation and change.  For that reason, this innovative website is referenced on several websites, including an Oprah.com blog post about "What to Do When You're Feeling Defeated."   

Engineers Without Borders (EWB) set up this website to encourage aid workers to share their mistakes—and to kickstart future success, and then some.

After allowing for the process of accepting defeat, realize defeat and crisis can transform us, renew us, and provide a different perspective.  I may be the transformative feedback we need and have been missing.
  
~  Deb 

Reference:  Tracking the Defining Moments of Crisis Process and Practice by Amisha Mehta, , Robina Xavier. Public Relations Review, Volume 38, Issue 3, September 2012, Pages 376–382, Available online 29 December 2011

 

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Kristin Newton's curator insight, May 4, 2015 1:58 AM
Starting over fresh, with new wisdom, can be a gift in disguise.
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Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:49 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Zappos is going Holacratic: No Job Titles, No Managers, No Hierarchy

Zappos is going Holacratic: No Job Titles, No Managers, No Hierarchy | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“Zappos’ focus on core values and culture has done a remarkably good job of getting around the limits of a conventional corporate structure.” .....“Leaders that already understand the limits of conventional structures are the ones that are attracted to Holacracy.”


__________________
    
“Leaders that already understand the limits of conventional structures are the ones that are attracted to Holacracy.”

       
__________________


CEOs who sign on to Holacracy agree to cede some level of power*. The advantage is that they get to view their company through an entirely different lens. But it’s an adjustment for both leaders and employees. Zappos, which has 1,500 employees, will be the largest company to date to implement Holacracy.


DN:  My contention is hierarchical & autocratic power has natural limits anyway. 


From a recent Forbes article:


…E-commerce retailers like Zappos to tech companies like Valve (famous for having no bosses) to manufacturers like W.L. Gore (famous for democratically electing its CEO), flat organizations are prospering.“There is a growing body of evidence that shows organizations with flat structures outperform those with more traditional hierarchies in most situations,” wrote Tim Kastelle in the Harvard Business Review.


Flat structures work best when a company’s main point of differentiation is innovation, said Kastelle. They also work well when teams need to be more nimble to respond to a rapidly changing environment, and when the organization has a shared purpose, he added.


…Digital and mobile technologies make it easier for employees to work in a distributed manner, wrote Kastelle.


ANOTHER Forbes article provides a counterpoint,  by a former Wall Street Journal writer, is entitled:   Gurus Gone Wild: Does Zappos' Reorganization Make Any Sense?   He quotes another blogger, William Tincup, who lists 6 problems with Holacracy.


Here are four of them in a nutshell:


  • Holacracy seems to be a scheme that’s built for growth, upmarket, happy times


  • People that will thrive in this system will be: (1) people that have a problem with authority, (2) people that can consume ambiguity, and (3) independent thinkers and doers. ...They will argue that it’s an efficient system, a lean system, and it will be at the expense of diversity. 

    

  • Holacracy [is a] value system. Kind of seems cultish, right? 
    
  • How will it scale?    Holacracy is a paper napkin idea that might best fit less than 1% of the companies in America.


Related posts & tools by Deb:


      

            

         

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Zappos is known for its zany corporate culture based on 10 core values, innovative/ alternative work environment, and for legendary customer service.  Now Zappos may become known for breaking the hierarchy barriers to how innovative companies are structured and function.  We'll soon find out if it will scale in the bigger organization that is Zappos.


Flatter, social circle organization seems fully in line with the 10 core values of Zappos.  Overall, their great success can has been attributed to many things, incuding a clear, compelling vision of who and what they are and are not, including "It’s Not about Shoes." 

  • "Zappos is a customer service company that just happens to sell shoes.” -Tony Hsieh


In the same way, Coca-Cola is about entertainment, not sugar-water. Zappos now has legendary customer service stories included in books - such as the one about delivering flowers to a customer whose mom passed away.  Another one is about a Zappos rep talking to a customer for over 8 hours (a record that now has been broken.)


As an example, General Motors has adopted a teams approach in some of its plants, yet moves slowly as large multi-national.  Enter the new team oriented, from the ranks GM CEO Mary Barra.  The times, they are a changing!

Zappos has none of the history of hierarchy and the silo creating 1920's scientific management connected older manufacturing practices, to hold it back.


Welcome to a new view of leadership, 2014 style.  Now, we'll see if it will scale.    ~  D

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Kudos's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:36 PM

An interesting experiment. The fine line between madness and genious. Can people handle it. Time will tell. 

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How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson

How I Hire: Focus On Personality ~ Sir Richard Branson | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

There is nothing more important for a business than hiring the right team. If you get the perfect mix of people working for your company, you have a far greater chance of success."


Excerpted:

Personality is the key. It is not something that always comes out in interview – people can be shy.....It is easier with an extrovert, but be wary of people becoming overexcited in the pressure of interviews.


________________________

Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. 

________________________


You can learn most jobs extremely quickly once you are thrown in the deep end. Within three months you can usually know the ins and outs of a role. If you are satisfied with the personality, then look at experience and expertise.


Find people with transferable skills – you need team players who can pitch in and try their hand at all sorts of different jobs. While specialists are sometimes necessary, versatility should not be underestimated.


Related posts by Deb:
     

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

      

Beyond Resilience: Black Swans, Anti-Fragility and Change

       

Using Jung to Clarify the Power of Introversion and Extroversion in Coaching

 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes!  Starting with personality, then transferable skills and fit into culture (read, the BIG team) makes such a difference, yet does not fit our hiring patterns that are often about fitting into a template of past skill categories.   

Sir Richard Branson's piece also highly resonantes with his LinkedIn audience based on the commentary.   He moves credentials MUCH further down on the list.

This is from a successful entrepreneur who knows failure.  He did not succeed in his first two businesses, selling Christmas Trees and parakeets (really.) From there he rose from work at a record shop, to Virgin Records in the 1970s to a large network of businesses including Virgin Galactic in 2012.
 

"A business has to be involving, it has to be fun, and it has to exercise your creative instincts." ~ Richard Branson

~  Deb 


PS:  One of the comments, "Can I work for you?"  :-)

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:03 AM

Originally posted in Change  Leadership Watch, this post gives great pointers on what really matters when YOU decide where you best fit and can contribute.  ~  D

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!
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Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Like any good leader, she knows who creates real value, and how, in her company." She's seen and is acting on the performance results.

___________________

...she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success...

___________________


Blog author Michael Schrage says,


"Mayer's Google background (and impact) suggested that she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success as computational/design brilliance.


…the Googleplex for its employees wasn't health food benevolence, it was to keep people on campus working together."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an opposing view to the last ScoopIt post.    Seven (7) months is still a short term view in light of this HBR blogger's view that Ms. Mayer is on the right track.


Previous culture can also be a blind spot.  One culture's success does not always paste onto another's key needs.

Change colleague Liz Guthridge, who specializes in change communication, suggests that leaders Avoid “taser” asks to get others to act, referencing Mayer's style of communicating the change.  I tend to agree with Liz.  Yet, there are bigger issues than communication mistakes.    


Time will tell.  ~ Deb

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High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video

High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"People are more instantaneously alive in healthy in High Quality Connections."


Listen here (brief 4 min. video) as Professor Jane Dutton unlocks the importance of high quality connections and four ways how to make them.  


It is NOT the same as developing positive relationships.


Dr. Dutton is a co-founder of the Univ. of Michigan's Ross Business Schools growing domain of expertise called Positive Organizational Scholarship www.bus.umich.edu/Positive

Her past research has explored processes of organizational adaptation, focusing on how strategic issues are interpreted and managed in organizations, as well as issues of organizational identity and change.


Imagine the impact on a culture if this became a people investment value.


Photo credit:  http://www.erb.umich.edu/

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Moving attention from negative deviance to positive deviance (as there is MUCH research on failure and what doesn't work) is what brings this resource to a change leadership watch listing instead of change management resources.

From the first time that I've met Jane Dutton, I've been struck by her openness and deep focus on the scholarship of high quality connections and the impacts they have within organizations.  

A chapter on the subject is here:  High Quality Connections

Let me know what you think.  ~  Deb 

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Undiscovered: The Sound Value of Creative Industries: Sex, Drugs, Rock 'N' Roll

Undiscovered: The Sound Value of Creative Industries: Sex, Drugs, Rock 'N' Roll | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Creative industries bring more than a feel good factor. They bring hard cash and jobs to any country that nurtures this sector."


Creatives often express an antipathy towards making commercial profit and their business skills can be limited – so policy makers and investors write them off as unpredictable and difficult to control, but this is stereotyping that is inhibiting growth!
 

____________________

The separation of creative and management processes is counterproductive ...ensuring the appropriate development of them/into marketable commodities is in short supply.

____________________


“Creative content sectors …are more likely to have their finance applications rejected by finance providers than non CIBs with similar risk profiles” but the evidence shows that creative SMEs have greater longevity than the industry average and, over the long term, deliver better returns."


…Within the Creative and Cultural Industries (CCI) sector, the functions of business management and creativity converge in a way that they don’t in other industries.

The separation of creative and management processes is counterproductive and the management of creatives and creative/cultural content in ensuring the appropriate manipulation and development of them/that content into marketable commodities is in short supply.
 

So there is a perceived risk in management and marketing – which is not backed up by the reality, as these figures show:
 

The average survival rates of CCIs after 5 years compared to all business
CCIs 49.7%    All UK businesses 46.9%
 

And for high growth firms it is even more impressive
CCIs 7.5%    All UK businesses 6%



What are creative and cultural industries? >>  @elebelfiore :  http://t.co/zR41O1qv)


Related blog topic from Deb:


   
    

   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I was intrigued by the statistics and the opportunity of this piece, featuring UK research.  In these trying time, financially and culturally, you still "gotta have art."  ~ Deb

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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.


  • On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.

3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


Read about LinkedIn's new endorsement features here, via Deb's Tech Tuesday blog post:


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 11:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:25 AM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!

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Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Culture consciousness and people management present challenges greater than those related to cost trimming when implementing change, via Lebanese-born Dr. Joe Khoury.

  

Deep change expertise, communication & inclusion in goal achievement lean process is key to this review. ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

__________________


...people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.


__________________

   

Dr. Khoury was one of three engineers lined up to relate success stories of lean principles’ implementation.


“Never underestimate the importance of culture,” Dr. Khoury cautioned.  "...Understanding your people will take you a long way towards reaching your lean goals.”


__________________

   

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner.

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury and others from the wider Methode family, including former manager Edward Chetcuti, now a lean adviser and coach, devised the VAVE (value added, value engineering) process to deliver value more efficiently.

 

The process was implemented successfully in China, where labor costs are traditionally lower, and later in the US.

 

The team also created customized software, able to provide a snapshot of the movements of major contributors to raw material cost. The software was later patented.

 

In Mr. Chetcuti earlier project, he examined behavior and processes and found that people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________


   

Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” ~ Antoine Bonello

 

_________________________

 

After classroom training & simulation, Mr Chetcuti and the team took the principles to the shopfloor. People learned to see waste and took ownership of the mission to reduce it and to get things right first time.

 

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner. Creative flow of value to the customer began soon after the company stabilised. Within eight months, profits improved significantly.

  
“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” Betfair’s global head of process improvement Antoine Bonello, explained.

   

“We expect people to learn by themselves, but even in the best companies, employees can score very low on knowledge of what they are doing. Value engineering prevents mistakes from being replicated. ”

 

Read the full article here.

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To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case: IRIS International

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case:  IRIS International | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"How IRIS International treated its toxic company culture to achieve dramatic growth."

Learn How IRIS International became a company that is setting the bar in innovation, collaboration, and growth.

Excerpts:

When César García came to IRIS International 10 years ago, the company was on the ropes. The manufacturer of medical diagnostic products had a stale product line, flat revenues, and mounting debt.

_______________


Annual revenue [lept] from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year.

_______________

   


García welcomed the challenge of a turnaround and in 2003, he became president and CEO of IRIS (International Remote Imaging Systems). He brought in a new management team. Secured debt refinancing. Pushed hard for new product development.

But García quickly concluded that the real problem was IRIS’s toxic company culture. It was a culture that kept its employees locked in silos and prevented the organization from seizing external opportunities.

The transformation at IRIS under García’s leadership has been extraordinary. The company has launched 15 new products in the last 10 years. Annual revenue has leaped from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year, with $129 million projected for 2012. 

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Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster

Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

With nine FIFA executives under arrest, the organization that manages the World Cup [is] a poster child for governance gone wrong.


____________________________
 
Sepp Blatter is ...expected to win re-election, ...though a hairless bear would do less damage as president.”  

~ by Satirist John Oliver. HBO's Last Week Tonight,  this segment received 10 million YouTube views

____________________________
  

A brief synopsis of the 5 leadership lessons:
   

1. A HISTORY OF ETHICAL LAPSES
A pair of World Cups—planned for Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022— have allegations of bribery tied to the bidding process for each event.
     

2. RESISTANCE TO TRANSPARENCY
On occasions when corruption charges were investigated, FIFA worked to avoid public reporting and chose not to release reports in their original forms.
       

3. DEEP CULTURAL PROBLEMS
In one example, Michael J. Garcia, a former U.S. attorney for New York’s Southern District, claimed that a colleague on the Ethics Committee, Hans-Joachim Eckert, had misrepresented his report in a summary Eckert wrote that effectively cleared the way for the World Cups in Qatar and Russia to proceed.

     

4. FAILURE TO CHANGE
Two outside organizations produced change reports in 2011 and 2012, offering dozens of suggestions as to how to FIFA could solve its governance problems. However, few of these ideas have been implemented. 

      

5. LACK OF PUBLIC SUPPORT
“The crazy thing is, Sepp Blatter is widely expected to win re-election, [and he did] even though a hairless bear would do less damage as president,” satirist John Oliver said on his HBO program, Last Week Tonight, in a segment that has received more than 10 million views on YouTube.

    

As with all ScoopIt articles, click on the title or photo to see the full, original article.


Related articles in this series of three:

 Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.
   

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

    

4 Leadership Lessons from Horse-Guided Coaching (Reveln)



 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The president of FIFA has now resigned, after running for reelection in spite of the negative press and widely reported problems that happened during his leadership.  Do these 5 leadership problems resonate with what you know to be true about FIFA?  

Is it time to elect the hairless bear?  (See item 5 in the synopsis.) ~  Deb

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After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.

After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“…With the problems [it] faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA…worth being saved?”
 

...the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed its 47-count indictment against those individuals has focused on how FIFA’s governance structure—which gives its 209 member-nations and each one’s soccer association equal voting rights—made it susceptible to widespread wrongdoing.
    
_________________________________
   
…change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture …[What are] the shared set of values that [transcend] all of those cultural differences?” ~ Jean Frankel

_________________________________
   
     
So with all of the problems it faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA an organization capable of, or even worth, being saved?

Jean Frankel, president of Ideas for Action, LLC, certainly thinks so.

“Organizations like these do have a place, and they’re essential in the grand scheme of things,” she said. “World football is the biggest sport on earth, so you need a governing body of this large sport. You need somebody to set the rules, promote the sport, and do all of those positive things.”

_________________________________


Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 

_________________________________

Frankel, who recently helped the NCAA navigate a massive governance overhaul, said she sees a number of similarities between the two organizations.
   
“People asked that question of the NCAA: Do we need them? Can’t the [collegiate athletics] conferences just govern themselves?” she said. “Of course, the answer to that was ‘no.’ The conferences can’t govern themselves, because you need to have one place where a consensus has to be reached, where governance and oversight can happen.”

A fix for FIFA could even borrow from the model the NCAA ultimately landed on, said Frankel, which included weighted voting.

“It worked for the NCAA, because it was the closest thing that you could have to some kind of level playing field,” she said. “Large conferences in the NCAA and large countries in the soccer world have more resources and more to gain and lose.”

....But change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture than anything, explained Frankel.  ....Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 


Read more about Jean Frankel, the NCAA governance story, and the Ideas for Action group here.  Full disclosure below.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Jean's comments indicate a positive organizational scholarship informed vision of change, how deeply flawed organizations can use their flaws as a pivot point to get back on the straight and narrow.  The article, available in full here, highlights what worked for the NCAA in turning their organization around.
   
_______________________________

Tensions ran high enough that the largest schools began to consider the possibility of breaking away to form their own organization.  

_______________________________

      

Excerpt:  Think it’s hard for your board to work effectively? Try doing so while under constant scrutiny from the public and media—and even congress. That’s exactly what the NCAA, college sports’ governing body, faced as it restructured its governance model..

I believe this could be either a great example of large scale system positive change or of failure.  This is based on knowing the NCAA story of how governance can be fixed, of how to lead change based in what's NOT working, how how those exact dysfunctional aspects of an organization can be the basis for renewal and rebirth, of being made new again.   Full disclosure, I've joined the Ideas for Action group this spring, because of Jean and because of the bench strength of the organization.

 

 

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Chipotle Leadership Looks Within, Using Generation Flux's Secret Weapon

Chipotle Leadership Looks Within, Using Generation Flux's Secret Weapon | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Chipotle has distinguished itself from the Burger Kings and McDonald's of this world by relying on "naturally raised" meat that is antibiotic- and hormone-free, by dropping trans fats from its cooking before doing so was in vogue, and by offering organically certified beans and avocados. ...Other chains reheat frozen items in a mechanized system. At Chipotle, Ells points out, "we're actually cooking. If you walk into the refrigerator, you'll see fresh onions and peppers and raw meat that isn't tenderized or treated in any way."

Excerpted:   That mission drives Chipotle's sales and marketing..  When Chipotle's ad agencies couldn't find a way to make "food with integrity" a compelling sales proposition, Ells dumped them and brought marketing in-house. Now the company is winning industry awards, and building valuable customer loyalty, through campaigns such as The Scarecrow. The online video and game about farmers and fresh food has become a best seller on the App Store, downloaded nearly 700,000 times [and]  has fueled Chipotle's growth. The company now has some 1,700 stores, up from 1,350 two years ago; revenue is $3.6 billion, up more than $1 billion over the same time; and Chipotle's market cap doubled to a whopping $21 billion.

   

Steve Ells and Chipotle are hardly alone in embracing what Ells calls a "loftier" vision for the enterprise. "...another renegade CEO declared... his frame for decision making was moral: "We do things because they're just and right." This emphasis on social goals over financial performance seems almost revolutionary—and yet the renegade is none other than Tim Cook of Apple, CEO of the most valuable company in the world.
 

[As for]... Generation Flux, [they are the] people best positioned to thrive in today's era of high-velocity change. Fluxers are defined not by their chronological age but by their willingness and ability to adapt, ...defining where business and culture are moving. ...Purpose is at the heart of their actions... [not] social service. ...Mission..allows them to filter the modern barrage of stimuli, to motivate and engage those around them, and to find new and innovative ways to solve the world's problems. ….Businesses that find and then live by their mission often discover that it becomes their greatest competitive advantage.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Purpose and Generation Flux are central concepts to values centered, purpose driven and highly successful companies and more companies, who have this at their core as they grow, are finding success.  Those who do not will not be able to change or adapt to it later.    ~  D

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Waigaya Is the Way, Beyond the Hierarchy at Honda, On the Shop Floor

Waigaya Is the Way, Beyond the Hierarchy at Honda, On the Shop Floor | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

At the Japanese auto giant, unplanned, agenda-free meetings are ubiquitous and indispensable.


None of the conference rooms were available, so the meeting was held in a maintenance closet...


Shoehorned into the room were factory floor managers, assembly line associates ...and quality control experts at the Anna, Ohio, engine plant, where Honda has been making motors and drivetrain components since 1985. 


...All points of view or suggestions are equal.  A serious crisis on the plant floor spurred [a} spontaneous meeting. 


Such unplanned, shapeless gatherings are the hallmark of the Honda Way. They are called waigaya, ...a name given them by Takeo Fujisawa, the business partner of company founder Soichiro Honda...


On that day…, away from the thrum of the factory, …a Honda manager said to the others, “Look, I’d prefer not to belabor this issue because we’ve got a lot of work to do to get this process moving. And since the fix will be such a time sink, let’s not make it worse by losing more time discussing it.”

    

Although most in the room concurred with the manager, one of the associates noted… “We’re doing something very wrong if a slight problem in the engine isn’t addressed until the end of the vehicle’s assembly line…   We should have discovered this problem before.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Equality of viewpoints, perspective, fixing problems in real time, this is the modern company.    Honda's brand is focused on

their Fundamental Beliefs of:

  • Respect for the Individual
  • The Three Joys:   The Joy of Buying, Selling, and Creating
    

Management Policy includes:

  • Proceed always with ambition and youthfulness.
  • Enjoy your work and encourage open communication.
  • Strive constantly for a harmonious flow of work.


The example of the meeting in a broom closet illustrates a less hierarchical approach. Hierarchy has advantages, but is also not as necessarily in Honda's fluid approach.  What do you find useful in the Honda example?  `  Deb

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Your Team Can Smell a Rat

Your Team Can Smell a Rat | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Let’s call him Frank.He seemed so sincere, so talented, so driven. When I met him on a business trip—my former CEO and I—I liked him right away. ...Seemed like a great fit."


The CEO and I didn’t listen to our subject matter experts. We thought we knew better.


Frank was a disaster. He one of the most self-absorbed and devious people I’ve ever worked with. Because of the benevolent nature of our organization I was working for at the time, it took us years to untangle the mess we had gotten into, and by then he’d done serious damage to our team’s reputation—not to mention motivation and productivity.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One of the author's more recent book is, All In: How the Best Managers Create a Culture of Belief and Drive Big Results,  It features solid research and good examples of the impact of culture on success, so he knows from this single example of "the rat" to company wide culture change on what makes a difference.  


From one reviewer:   In a healthy culture....those who share it are nourished by mutual respect and trust. It is no coincidence that most of the companies that are annually ranked [as] most admired and best to work for are also annually ranked among those that are most profitable and have the greatest cap value in their respective industries.    ~  D

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A great lesson in hoy leaders would listen to their team before making  key hires.

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Insourcing at GE: The Real Story of Process, Change, Culture and Profit

Insourcing at GE: The Real Story of Process, Change, Culture and Profit | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"The focus has been on jobs coming back. It's really a process and a culture story."

GE Appliances is proving once again that the balance of process and people, aligned with a clearly articulated and understood purpose and vision, is the source of improved performance and capability development. With leadership engagement and support, this system will thrive


Excerpted:


  • There was a fishbone diagram of the production flow
  • A cardboard mockup of the factory layout which also showed how the equipment would look.
  • At 7:45 a.m. each day leaders met, then at 8:00 a.m. everyone met to review the prior day, and what they would do that day.
  • Then at 4:15 p.m. everyone met again to review what they'd done.


The water heater that resulted was a new design, with better performance: 20% fewer parts and 50% less labor.


Inventory was reduced 60%, labor efficiency improved 30%, time-to-produce was reduced 68%, and space required for the line came down by 80%.


The development team was extremely cohesive. But the problem was, the culture needed to change outside the "Big Room" and very few cultural change efforts had been made since 1994.

As the leadership began to introduce a new way of working together it had to solidify trust in the workforce and instill a level of confidence that continuous improvement was not just another initiative that would pass. This would be a journey.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The insourcing story of GE is actually a process & culture change story, which is how it comes to be shared here on Change Leadership Watch.  ~  D

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What Makes Costco One of America’s Best Companies

What Makes Costco One of America’s Best Companies | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
The Motley Fool - Costco is one of the 25 Best Companies in America.


The case for Costco
Costco has been lionized as "the Anti-Walmart" for its long policy of paying all employees a living wage and good benefits, including health coverage. In 2005, The New York Times claimed the average pay for Costco employees was 42% higher than Wal-mart's Sam's Club warehouse.


In 2008, Slate reported that after five years, a cashier makes about $40,000, and that workers pay only about 12% of health care costs out of pocket.


Any kind of job at Costco can also turn into a career thanks to the company's policy of hiring from within.


Wall Street, predictably, hates this. According to them, employees should be paid the least possible so that returns can accrue to shareholders.


In 2004, Deustche Bank analyst Bill Dreher famously complained that at Costco, it's better to be an employee than a shareholder.


Well, if Bill Dreher was a shareholder in 2004, I hope he didn't sell. Between January of 2004 and 2013, Costco shares more than quadrupled market returns, returning 180% to the S&P 500's 40%.


...The Foolish bottom line
Over 30 years, ...Costco has defied Wall Street "wisdom" through generosity to employees and devotion to customers, making investors rich along the way.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Visit Sam's Club & visit Costco. Notice the difference in the vibe from the staff. ~ Deb

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Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:


__________________

Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years
.

__________________


...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!


A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 


...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.


Related posts by Deb:


     

   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

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Culture Reigns, The 50 Best Places to Work by Glassdoor, Employees Choice

Culture Reigns, The 50 Best Places to Work by Glassdoor, Employees Choice | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Glassdoor announces the results of the 50 Best Places to Work in 2013, their fifth annual Employees Choice Awards."

Excerpts:

_______________________
   
"I love coming to work and being around professionals that are willing to help each other and listen to each other."

_______________________


Best work ever


Pros – Ambitous co-workers. Great athmosphere. Interesting problem I've been working on. Newest technologies.


Former Facebook Software Engineer in Menlo Park, CA – Reviewed Jan 16, 2013


Other "Pros" comments from top companies in the top 50:
   

  • "I love coming to work and being around professionals that are willing to help each other and listen to each other."
     
  • "The people are great. Everyone goes out of their way to help. The career opportunities are excellent. Citrix promotes from within the company this means that managers know and understand employees. The benefits are also good and there are 3 health insurance options."

   


And the "Cons" are also there:

  • "Seems like the company has started inserting many levels of management and not sure what they all do." 
         
  • "The processes and internal information is disorganized. I find my self in situations being asked if I have completed a certain task or process that I did not know it existed. Once it is clear I am not aware I learn and move on."

Culture related posts on Deb's blog:
   
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a different type of communication when employees volunteer their pros and cons on Glassdoor, vs. a typical culture survey.  The top 50 commentaries illustrate of what makes for company that knows how to move with the times AND connect with their people.  ~ Deb

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Target Managing Change, Unique & Standard, Starting With the CIO

Target Managing Change, Unique & Standard, Starting With the CIO | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Target Corp. is among the top three or four U.S. retailers, ...a coveted position in such a volatile industry.  IT is a critical player in each move, if not a keystone."


The CIO of Target provides insight into how the giant retailer accomplished major change in the last 2-3 years.  For readers from larger companies with IT responsible for helping support major change, how does their story resonate with what you've experienced with IT as an accelerator or lever?

_________________________

  

We're making changes where [project] life cycle is a matter of days or weeks...

_________________________


Excerpts:

Target brought over Beth Jacob from an operations post, an unconventional move. Jacob was vice president of guest operations when she was tapped to lead IT as executive vice president and CIO with a budget of over $1 billion.


She oversaw Target.com's switch from Amazon.com's e-commerce platform to one that was home-grown.


At the other end of the big-project spectrum, Jacob has introduced projects that capitalize on mobile computing, such as smartphone coupons.


CIO Insight: The nature or change has changed, hasn't it? It seems that change isn't always iterative... You can't attack fires the same way because the fire's never the same.


Jacob: You're spot on. …change management is …going to be more important than ever. ...Change is something we lean into.


Because of that, the TTS team has had to change almost everything, including the way it partners [internally and externally]. And the way it approaches different organizational change initiatives.


...In the last year or so, the pace of change has significantly increased. We're making changes where the [project] life cycle is a matter of days or weeks - think about the mobile capabilities we've implemented.


CIO Insight: ...days and weeks. Can you expand on that?


Jacob: We have to be ready to bring a company offering to our guests and staff, both of whom are more tech savvy. One example would...mobile [device] coupons. Last holiday, we created a mobile-coupon program tied to our toy catalog in just a few days. ...The coupons are very easy for guests to use, very easy for our team members to work with.


[Ed. note: Target claims to be the first national retailer to offer a scanable mobile-coupon program, in 2010. Shoppers who opt in get a text-message link to a mobile Web page that can contain multiple with offers, all accessible through a single bar code. Coupons are then redeemed by a cashier scanning the bar code on the shopper's phone at checkout.]


CIO Insight: You took a big gamble ...when Target decided to abandon Amazon.com's e-commerce platform for one you built yourselves. 


Jacob: It took us just over two years to get off the Amazon platform and onto our own. Overall, it went well.


Photo source:  Wikipedia.org (en)


Click on the title or photo to read the full article.


From Deb,  Change Management is an engagement focus. Exert too much control, and you stifle it. Here's more about control issues within a project implementation:


   
    
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Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO]

Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO] | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Intuit founder Scott Cook and what went wrong the first time they rolled out the company's Quicken tax prep software worldwide.


It would see cultural due diligence was the lesson learned here.  

______________________________

   

We can launch,  ....but then the sales slowed way down.  

______________________________ 

   

Yes, it seems it was a ethnocentric blind spot.  Paraphrased:  ONLY in the US did we studying the customer & give them exactly what they wanted.  We didn't do that overseas.  

    

Excerpted:

   

We'd get meetings of our global teams together…  We could launch, could get the press, we could fill the channel, we'd get initial evidence.

   

But then the sales slowed way down.   

   

Visiting the Japanese:  150 people crammed into the biggest room we had.   Strategy, plan, dream.  He asked for questions.  In Japan, they don't ask questions of the big guy.  Silence.

   

One engineer, finally, cautiously raised his hand:  Why does our product for Japan look just like an American product?  It was built for Americans, not Japanese.   …And he was right.  Ultimately the root cause problem was too hard to overcome.

   

The root cause was baked into our early decision.   …We build them based on what we knew in the U.S.

   

See the full video here.

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Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader

Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Social business culture wins again in the competitive high tech world, with collaboration and tremendous employee and client loyalty to prove it."

   

This is one of the smarter change/culture pieces of read recently, with good stats and means.  It's a Forbes piece on collaborative culture by Christine Comaford, contributor.  Here collaboration is NOT a myth or buzz word,  rather it appears to be in full practice and working quite well, thank you!  ~  Deb

   

Excerpts:

   

Stats on Enterasys:  One of the fastest growing networking companies in high tech:


  • Produced 3 years of consecutive top-line year-over-year revenue growth
  • Grown 25% of sales from new customers
  • Had less than 5% annual employee attrition
  • Has a Net Promoter Score of 81 – NPS score is not a typo
   
Their tools used include Salesforce.com’s Chatter, Twitter, Facebook to accelerate business via connection & collaboration. 
   

_________________________

   

A ‘social’ executive sponsor must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable.

   

_________________________

   

Vala Afshar, Enterasys’ Chief Customer Officer says it is because the company is a social enterprise featuring their collaborative and customer focused culture thriving in this highly competitive market.

   

Samples of the tenents of their culture building & sustaining:

   

1. Define a meaningful purpose

    

Social collaboration is not about social media. It is about the purpose of collaboration and execution. A strong culture is based on tenants of transparency, accountability, execution velocity, and mass collaboration.

   

2. Ensure simplicity and user experience

   

Key:  social technology selection criterion must be “ease of use” for both the employee and customer experience => highly dependent on seamless integration, ease of use, and alignment to existing workflows.

   

3. Have a ‘social’ executive sponsor

   

The executive must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable. The executive sponsor must be actively engaged and enthusiastically willing to promote inter-departmental collaboration. Influence and likeability are key success factors.

   

_________________________

  

[Don't] force collaboration, [instead offer] encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

_________________________

   

6. Create social collaboration functional groups

   

Pre-establish a group representing various functions - a social collaboration team, including a Social ELT members (marketing, sales, services, IT, engineering – extended leadership team), who represent various functions, can do this at the beginning. Within lines of business, it is more likely that employees will collaborate.


Once comfortable collaborating internally, connections will begin to establish outside the lines of business.

   

8. Measure adoption

   

Celebrate and recognize power collaborators and how they are positively impacting business objectives. Recognize the most followed, the most posts and even potential for training opportunities. [Don't] force collaboration, instead offer encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

10. Passionately embrace change and have fun

  

Social collaboration is ...most of all it is about enjoying the people your work with and the work that you do. Have fun growing mindshare and your business.

    

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecomaford/2012/06/19/if-you-are-not-social-you-will-shrink-10-steps-to-becoming-a-social-business/

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