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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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The "Un-CEO" Of W.L. Gore, How To Deal With Chaos, Terry Kelly

The "Un-CEO" Of W.L. Gore, How To Deal With Chaos, Terry Kelly | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Embrace "rainmakers," says the leader of the company behind Gore-tex. Her mantra for seeing 10,000 associates in dozens of countries through turbulent times: maturity.


We have what we call rainmakers and implementers,” Kelly explains.


________________________

So we try to protect the rainmakers. That means we have to be comfortable with more chaos.”

________________________


“Rainmakers come up with wild ideas, implementers make them real. The two drive each other crazy. If you’re not careful, control will gravitate to the implementers. So we try to protect the rainmakers. That means we have to be comfortable with more chaos.”


“Our organization is used to dealing with chaos, we have a high tolerance for it. We like to respond to crises. When the ship is under attack, the level of ownership is high, culturally. But you don’t want to run an organization that is constantly under attack.”

~ Deb
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Not everything is innovative and cutting edge at W.L. Gore (Gore-Tex).  As a large private company, they have their share of issues among the ranks.  


Glassdoor, which does tend to draw plenty of naysayers and disgruntled reviews, also provides a negative universe window in, which includes Gore's peer (associates) review process tied to compensation, usually (in my book) a bad idea - to tie compensation to anything involving review.  ~  D

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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"Empowerment Congress" Leaders Work to Develop their Communities

"Empowerment Congress" Leaders Work to Develop their Communities | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"City leaders have seen divisions sprout up, [causing separations] by national and ethnic identities. [This program is about] changing attitudes so that a majority of residents feel they have a stake in their community as a whole."



“We are not just building projects but we need to include people in the development of ideas.” ~ Jesse Clark


“Some key elements of this conference struck me in the gut,” said Clark, executive director of the Historic District Development Corporation.  “We are not just building projects but we need to include people in the development of ideas.”


The Empowerment Congress Leadership Institute was established to help communities around the country create effective ways of engaging and including residents in civic activities.


Throughout the week, the participants joined in panel discussions and presentations as well as a grand tour of Los Angeles, to gin up ideas for improving their own communities.


Clark was joined by Dagmar Epsten, Harold Barnette and several others from Atlanta.


“We have learned that having a powerful political advocate is very helpful indeed,” said Barnette. “We also learned that communities need to get out in front of changes and make their neighborhood look like how they want it.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Leadership development can have quite an impact on communities.  It is encouraging to learn how change leadership appears to be central to this program.  ~  Deb

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!